Menu

Saddle Sore No More

  • By Jené Shaw
  • Published Nov 14, 2012
  • Updated Feb 19, 2013 at 11:30 AM UTC

Say goodbye to an uncomfortable undercarriage with one of these chamois creams.

Sportique Century Riding Cream

This multitasking product serves as both a chamois cream and an anti-friction aid for wetsuits, with a shea butter feel that absorbs fast. $20, Sportiquebodycare.com

Assos Chamois Crème

The maker of $300-plus high-quality bib shorts has an accompanying chamois crème loved by many for its just-right thickness and menthol-y cooling sensation. $22, Assos.com

Endurance Shield Chamois Crème

You can smell the soothing combo of lavender, aloe vera and chamomile of this crème, which uses tea tree oil for its antibacterial properties. $25, Enduranceshield.com

Hoo Ha Ride Glide

Strong enough for a man but made for a woman? This might apply to Hoo Ha, given its all-natural, antibacterial, fragrance-free ingredients that include eucalyptus and tea tree oil. $22, Reflectsports.com

DIY Chamois Cream

Some athletes prefer their own cream concoctions, such as this “recipe” from Jonathan Blyer, the owner of Acme Bicycle Company in Brooklyn (Acmebicycleco.com). A “tub” of his homemade cream costs around $5.

Recipe:
8 oz Vaseline
1/2 oz Neosporin
¼-½ tsp tea tree oil

Directions: Warm the Vaseline in a bath of warm water. Once it gets soft, stir in the other ingredients.

“The Vaseline doesn’t wash away in the swim and it lasts a long time,” Blyer says. “The Neosporin is anti-bacterial, so in the event that you do get some minor abrasions, they are somewhat sterilized. Tea tree oil is good for the skin and it is naturally antibacterial. Plus, it smells kind of good.”

Disclaimer: We can’t vouch for how homemade creams like this one affect your favorite high-dollar chamois.

Why use it? To avoid chafing, friction and the bacteria that can lead to saddle sores. Some argue that it can even protect the integrity of your chamois. (Note: A proper bike fit and comfortable saddle are crucial to preventing these problems as well.)

How to apply: Wash hands. Apply liberally to body parts with chamois contact points (on the shorts is OK for extra protection).

A Few Chamois Don’ts

Do not share tubs of chamois cream with friends.

Do not tack on unnecessary “chamois time”—change out of your shorts before your post-ride coffee. 

Do not wear cycling shorts more than once between washes.

RELATED: Skincare Tips For Triathletes

FILED UNDER: Bike / Gear & Tech TAGS: / /

Jené Shaw

Jené Shaw

Jené Shaw is a senior editor at Triathlete magazine, a three-time Ironman finisher and a USAT Level 1 certified coach

Get our best triathlon content delivered to your inbox

Subscribe to the FREE Triathlete weekly newsletter