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The Pro Triathlete Body

  • By Julia Polloreno
  • Published May 31, 2013
  • Updated Oct 12, 2013 at 9:11 PM UTC
Hillary Biscay. Photo: Erik Isakson


Hillary Biscay
57-time Ironman finisher

After several hours out there, Ironman becomes a strength-endurance event. You have to be strong to be the one putting time into the competition in the eighth hour.

My focus for building strength for triathlon has always been sport-specific strength work built into my swim, bike and run workouts. This means things like big-gear work on the bike, swimming with paddles and band, and running hills—so I am doing some kind of strength work every day, really. In the past few months, I have added some TRX workouts twice a week to work on core strength and try to correct some of the imbalances that have been hindering my run. After several hours out there, Ironman becomes a strength-endurance event. You have to be strong to be the one putting time into the competition in the eighth hour.

I think you have to assess your specific needs and weaknesses and keep it simple; a lot of people overcomplicate this aspect of training when there really is no substitute for just climbing more hills or swimming more laps with your ankles tied together!

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FILED UNDER: Features / Injury Prevention / Training

Julia Polloreno

Julia Polloreno

As Editor-in-Chief of Triathlete magazine, Polloreno oversees the monthly magazine’s content and production. A Stanford University graduate with an award-winning track record in publishing, Polloreno is a two-time Ironman finisher and has been a competitive triathlete for more than a decade.

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