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Drink Up: H2O On The Go

  • By Aaron Hersh
  • Published Dec 10, 2013
  • Updated Feb 18, 2014 at 12:31 AM UTC
Photo: John David Becker

A few ounces of sports drink can be the difference between a productive workout and walking home. We tested these two hydration belts for the functions that make a difference.

Fuel Belt Revenge R30

$48, Fuelbelt.com

Comfort: The semi-firm belt solidly anchors against the hips and prevents the bottles from bouncing but still doesn’t bite into the skin as long as it sits on top of a layer of fabric (if it slides onto the skin, the belt can cause a little abrasion). Because it sits on the hips, it creates no additional pressure on the stomach.

Access: The behind-the-back holster position keeps the bottles out of the way and allows the arms to swing freely. Reinserting them with one hand seems tricky at first, but with a little practice, the bottle slides easily back into the holster. The bottle caps seal reliably and have to be opened to drink from.

Capacity: With a zipper pouch and space for three eight-ounce bottles, the R30 has more than enough storage for a long run or Ironman marathon with supplementation from aid stations.

RELATED: Hydration Tips For Triathletes

Fitletic Hydration Belt

$40, Fitletic.com

Comfort: The bottles rest on top of a large pad that helps diffuse any pressure that could cause potential hotspots. One issue, however, is that the more elastic belt tends to bounce slightly compared to the Fuel Belt, and it can ride up above the hip bones.

Access: The holsters are smartly angled to accessibly position the bottles and they firmly hold them in place once in the belt. Reinserting the bottles into the sturdy holsters takes a little additional effort. The self-sealing caps dispense liquid without needing to open the bottle.

Capacity: Two eight-ounce bottles and a large zipper pouch provide plenty of storage for most runs. The zipped storage is large enough to fit an iPhone 5 and two gel packets.

RELATED: Water Wars: The Dehydration Debate

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FILED UNDER: Gear & Tech / Run TAGS:

Aaron Hersh

Aaron Hersh

Aaron Hersh is the Senior Tech Editor of Triathlete magazine. To submit a question, write Aaron at Ahersh@competitorgroup.com.

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