Bethany Mavis – Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com Triathlon Training, Gear, Nutrition, Photos, Race Results & Calendars Fri, 22 Jul 2016 19:32:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.5.2 Pros Set To Compete In Inaugural Challenge Iceland http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/07/race-coverage/pros-set-compete-inaugural-challenge-iceland_134628 Thu, 21 Jul 2016 20:04:45 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=134628

Photo: Shutterstock.com

The race is the northernmost half-iron-distance triathlon in the world.

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A strong line-up of professional triathletes will be heading north to the picturesque country of Iceland for the inaugural half-iron-distance Challenge Iceland this weekend. The race is the northernmost half-iron-distance triathlon in the world, and while the location 30 minutes outside of the capital city of Rekjavík has served as a triathlon venue since 2014, this will be the first year it’s a part of the Challenge Family of races. It will serve as the first ever Nordic Championship, as the Challenge Family now has races in Denmark, Norway and Finland, in addition to Iceland.

The scenery will be stunning, as the 1.2-mile swim, 56-mile bike and 13.1-mile run will all take place in the dramatic fjord landscape. The race starts in Hvalfjordur Bay (“Whale Bay”), a crystal-clear lake formed by a glacier. It’s unique to have an open-water swim in Iceland—most triathlons have pool swims. The one-loop bike course traverses rolling hills and short climbs on one of the most iconic bike routes in Iceland. The half-marathon takes place on another scenic country road with long hills.

Both the men’s and women’s races have strong line-ups. Topping the men’s list are three men who are all ITU speedsters-turned-half-Ironman champions. Australian Brad Kahlefeldt is a former Olympian and multiple Ironman 70.3 champion; Great Britain’s Tim Don is a three-time Olympian, four-time ITU world champion and has already added a few 70.3 wins to his impressive résumé in 2016; and American Kevin Collington, who’s had some high-profile 70.3 podium finishes.

On the women’s side, Canadian Heather Wurtele, the 2015 Ironman 70.3 World Championship runner-up, will face tough competition from the Czech Republic’s Radka Vodickova, a former Olympian and multiple Ironman 70.3 champion; Great Britain’s Jodie Swallow, an Ironman champion and former 70.3 world champion; and Belgium’s Tine Deckers, a frequent long-course podium finisher.

RELATED: Challenge Family Announces Challenge Iceland

Pro men
Brad Kahlefeldt (AUS)
Tim Don (GBR)
Kevin Collington (USA)
Giulio Molinari (ITA)
Steve Rosinski (USA)
Allan Olesen (DEN)
Chris Fischer (DEN)
Brad Williams (USA)
Alex Reithmeier (AUS)
Justin Metzler (USA)
Greg Close (USA)
Marcus Hulthren (SWE)
Guilherme Campos (ITA)
Marcus Herbst (GER)

Pro women
Heather Wurtele (CAN)
Radka Vodickova (CZE)
Tine Deckers (BEL)
Jodie Swallow (GBR)
Carina Brechters (GER)
Alice Hector (GBR)

Find out more at Challengeiceland.is.

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Try This Protein-Packed Snack: 3 Beef Jerky Varieties http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/07/nutrition/multisport-menu_134279 Fri, 15 Jul 2016 22:00:10 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=134279 Jerky is no longer the preservative-filled junk of convenience store aisles.

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Jerky is no longer the preservative-filled junk of convenience store aisles. New companies are creating much healthier options made from sustainable sources so athletes can enjoy this protein-packed snack as part of an omnivorous diet. 

EPIC Hunt & Harvest Mix

EPIC Provisions continues to break new ground in the dried meat space with its twist on trail mix, sold in five flavors. Each resealable package comes with two pockets—one with organic, grass-fed beef jerky, and one with nuts, berries and/or seeds. When you open the package, you break the seal between the two pockets and create a protein-rich, flavorful snack. The Honest Harvest variety, which combines beef with lightly salted almonds, pecans, Brazil nuts and pistachios, was the taste test favorite for its heartiness and pleasant blend of textures. It’s rich in Omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin E, in addition to protein (more than 20 grams in the package). $4.99, Epicbar.com

RELATED: 9 Savory Bars For The Road

Field Trip Jerky

Available in four beef and two turkey flavors, the Cracked Pepper No. 7 Turkey Jerky was a winner in our taste test, thanks to its classic thin jerky texture and subtle spice. The Field Trip nutrition labels include only natural, recognizable ingredients, such as brown sugar, pineapple juice and apple cider vinegar, and all the brand’s jerkies are made with gluten-free reduced sodium soy sauce, making them entirely gluten-free. Thanks to the leanness of turkey meat, the turkey jerkies are fat free. $6.50, Fieldtripjerky.com

RELATED: Improve Your Go-To Staples By Adding These Foods

KivaSun Bison Jerky

This Native American-owned company makes its jerky from bison, which is lower in fat and higher in protein than beef. The hatch chile flavor (also available in original) is seriously addicting, with each bite finishing with a bit of heat. The bison is raised without antibiotics or hormones, and the jerky texture is soft and easy to chew, which the company says results from using a high-quality cut. The jerky contains zero artificial ingredients, and sales help fund type 2 diabetes education for Native American youth. $8.99, Kivasunfoods.com

More nutrition product reviews from Triathlete

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How I Fuel: Race Morning http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/07/nutrition/fuel-race-morning_134021 Mon, 11 Jul 2016 20:51:08 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=134021

Photo: Elisenda Farison Photography

Brittany Oliver, a former collegiate and now elite triathlete, shares how she prepares for a big race.

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Brittany Oliver, a former collegiate and now elite triathlete, shares how she prepares for a big race. 

Location
Ventura, Calif.

Occupation
Swim, triathlon and nutrition coach

Standout results
Earned USA Triathlon elite license at the Detroit Triathlon Elite Development race in 2015

Backstory
Oliver started racing triathlon while a sophomore at UCLA in 2008 after deciding the women’s swim team wasn’t for her. In 2009, she finished top five at the USAT Collegiate National Championship and was named a USAT All American in 2009, 2010 and 2013. After earning her elite card last year, she’s stuck to mainly sprint and Olympic distances, especially draft-legal style.

RELATED – How I Fuel: Half-Iron Training

How I Fuel

The days leading up to a race, I like to pay extra attention to staying hydrated throughout the day. I try to keep caffeine to a minimum to set myself up to get some good quality sleep at night and reap the benefits of caffeine on race morning. I sometimes get a bit phlegmy with dairy foods, so if it is a really important race I might steer clear of milk, cheese and ice cream a few days before the race.

At least 2 hours before the race start, I usually either have a bowl of oatmeal (with raisins, walnuts, brown sugar, cinnamon and almond milk) that I have pre-mixed in a mason jar, or a toasted bagel with natural peanut butter and honey.

I typically bring a bag of green tea and drink a cup of that or have a caffeinated sports drink between breakfast and warm-up. I like Skratch Labs Exercise Hydration Mix with green tea and lemons because it is made with quality ingredients and has a natural caffeine boost. Then I have a banana or Honey Stinger Gel Gold about 15 minutes before the start. I like honey because it is easy to digest/absorb and makes me feel like my tank is fully topped off before the start.

RELATED: A Kona Qualifier Shares Her Pre-Ironman Fueling Strategy

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Sweat, Swig, Repeat: 4 Sports Drinks To Try http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/06/nutrition/sweat-swig-repeat-4-sports-drinks-try_133359 Wed, 22 Jun 2016 20:10:13 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=133359

Photo: Oliver Baker

Stay hydrated and fueled during hot-weather workouts with one of these sports drinks.

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Stay hydrated and fueled during hot-weather workouts with one of these sports drinks.

GQ-6 Flooid

This powdered drink blends easily in water and utilizes three different carbohydrate sources (maltodextrin, glucose and fructose) for a total of 28 grams per serving. It scores originality points for its tasty green apple flavor, which is especially refreshing when cold. Bonus: This drink contains zero artificial flavors or colors. Each serving contains 115 calories and ranks high on the electrolyte scale. $40 for 30-serving canister, Gq-6.com

Invigorade Endurance Drink

Available in three fruity flavors, Invigorade comes ready to drink with a natural ingredient list that includes sea salt and pure cane sugar. The coconut flavor, which is made with coconut water, won over taste testers, thanks to its unique yet refreshing tropical taste (one tester requested a paper umbrella). The drink features three different carbohydrate fuel sources plus an amino acid that delays muscle fatigue, according to the company. Each bottle (two servings) contains 120 calories, 32 grams of carbs plus sodium and potassium. $2.49, Invigorade.com

RELATED: 6 Ways To Upgrade Your Water

PLUS for Nuun

This flavorless effervescent tablet contains a blend of carbohydrates and electrolytes and was designed to be used in conjunction with your favorite flavored electrolyte tablet. It contains 50–90 calories per serving, depending on how many tablets you choose to dissolve in water (12 tabs per tube), giving you control over your calorie intake without messy powders or scoops. While it can complement any electrolyte tablet, it pairs perfectly with Nuun’s popular Active or Energy electrolyte tablets, which come in more than a dozen flavors and have both just had their ingredients upgraded for certified vegan and non-GMO status. $6.99, Nuun.com

First Endurance EFS-Pro

This updated version of EFS (Electrolyte Fuel System) was created with both customization and optimal osmolality in mind, allowing you to adapt your calories and electrolytes to your workouts while avoiding GI distress. It’s available in two very mild flavors—testers preferred the lemon water, which tastes true to its name. At 40 calories per scoop, you can mix 2–4 scoops in 12 ounces of water, though it may take some rigorous shaking to fully dissolve. The drink has multiple carbohydrate sources plus a hefty serving of electrolytes. $50 for 25-serving canister, Firstendurance.com

More nutrition reviews from Triathlete.com

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How I Fuel: Half-Iron Training http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/06/nutrition/fuel-half-iron-training_133271 Fri, 17 Jun 2016 19:00:42 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=133271

Photo by Sean Geene

An age-group triathlete shares his nutrition philosophy for long-course training.

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An age-group triathlete shares his nutrition philosophy for long-course training.

Michael Valdes, 33

Location
Brooklyn, N.Y.

Occupation
Stay-at-home dad to 4-year-old daughter and infant son

Standout results
Dropped 1 hour off his initial half-Ironman time (hit his goal of 5.5 hours)

Backstory
After moving to New York from Nashville, Tenn., Valdes started commuting to work on his bike and realized how poor his fitness was. To get into shape, he picked up running and eventually triathlons. Now in his third season, he races mostly half-iron-distance races and would like to shave another hour off his time (to get to 4.5 hours). He also escaped a life of drug addiction and is passionate about approaching triathlon as a platform to inspire others and help them live a more purposeful life.

“I focus on real, nutrient-dense foods, equally as much as training.”

“For longer weekend training sessions, I will fuel with both whole foods and sports supplements. For a Saturday morning, I’d have coffee and make a peanut butter and honey sandwich on sourdough (I stay stocked on Bread Alone sourdough) that gets packed in my bike jersey. If I am biking under 70 miles, I will take three water bottles—two bottles are filled with a carbohydrate mix and one with just water. I will ride for the first hour with water then start the fuel bottles. My drink mix consists of Cytomax Cyto Carb 2, Vega Sport Electrolyte Hydrator and a BCAA and glutamine. On super hot days I will add Hammer Endurolytes. This is usually enough to get me through the bike and often some sort of following run, of around four to eight miles.”

“I firmly believe in the importance of probiotics: I make my own kombucha, and I also consume a variety of fermented vegetables.”

“For morning workouts under 2 hours, I will not eat anything. I just have coffee beforehand, with a little milk in the coffee. I feel completely strong and not hungry with this intake.”

“I eat a diet that is very high in healthy fats and vegetables. A Vitamix-blended juice of herbs and vegetables is one of my main sources of vegetable intake: spinach, kale, chard, ginger, lemon, cilantro, parsley, dandelion, beets—some of those and sometimes all of those, depending on what I have on hand.”

RELATED: How To Approach Fueling On The Road

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Loving Right Now: Daily Harvest Smoothie Packs http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/06/nutrition/loving-right-now-daily-harvest-smoothie-packs_132754 Fri, 03 Jun 2016 21:28:09 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=132754

Photo: Oliver Baker

Daily Harvest smoothie packs are a convenient way to enjoy tasty at-home smoothies.

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If you are tiring of your usual recipe, are unsure how to mix things up or are just deterred by all the prep time, Daily Harvest smoothie packs are a convenient way to enjoy tasty at-home smoothies. The work is done for you—a cup containing flash-frozen, chopped whole-food ingredients (there are 14 different flavors) arrives at your door via subscription ($48 for a six-pack of cups, ships to 32 states, Daily-harvest.com). Skip the shopping, washing, chopping and portioning—just pour the ingredients straight into the blender with 1 cup of liquid (try coconut water, almond milk or just plain water), blend then pour back into the disposable cup. The result is a flavorful, nutrient-packed smoothie made with top-quality ingredients, such as kale, blueberries, walnuts or coconut oil (each blend has about 8–10 ingredients).

RELATED: 5 Smoothie Recipes For Summer

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5 New Energy Gel Flavors http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/06/nutrition/five-new-energy-gel-options_132699 Wed, 01 Jun 2016 16:40:52 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=132699

Photo: Oliver Baker

Whatever your flavor, ingredient or texture preferences, you can find the right energy gel from these five fresh options.

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Whatever your flavor, ingredient or texture preferences, you can find the right energy gel from these five fresh options. 

Honey Stinger Mango Orange Organic Gel

The newest certified organic and gluten-free gel flavor from Honey Stinger is made with honey (naturally) and tapioca syrup as fuel sources. Mango Orange has a sweet tooth-satisfying flavor with hints of citrus. Each 100-calorie packet contains 24 grams of carbohydrates plus 50 milligrams each of sodium and potassium. $33 for box of 24, Honeystinger.com

PowerBar Simple Fruit Energy Food

Just launched in April, PowerBar’s Simple Fruit provides a natural, clean way to fuel workouts. Made with fruit purées and available in three flavors (taste test favorite was the apple pear raspberry), it has the consistency and taste of applesauce with a hint of pear. Each packet contains 100 calories and 25 grams of carbohydrates, but you should look to get your electrolytes from another source. $1.99, Powerbar.com

RELATED: Triathlete’s 2016 Fuel Awards

GU Cucumber Mint Energy Gel

The new-for-2016 cucumber mint has a refreshingly original flavor compared to other gels, especially with its minty finish. It has the same smooth viscosity and formula as other GU gels—100 calories, 125 milligrams of sodium plus amino acids. It also has 20 milligrams of caffeine from green tea. Reach for this when you need a palate reset during a long workout. $1.45, Guenergy.com

Glukos Energy Gel

Glukos products are based on the idea that glucose is the form of fuel best utilized by your body, and that it can be absorbed immediately. This “gel” has the liquid consistency of a sports drink, which is great for those who can’t stomach typical gel thickness. Available in three fruity flavors (orange won the taste test), it has a higher volume (2 fluid ounces) and fewer calories (60) than other gels. It’s high in potassium, plus has sodium and 16 grams of carbs. $24 for box of 12, Glukosenergy.com

Hammer Montana Huckleberry Gel

This gel is made with real huckleberries, a flavor idea plucked from the company’s Montana roots. It has a thick, jam-like consistency and sweet, berry flavor. Nutrient-wise, each packet contains 90 calories, 22 grams of carbs, amino acids and is lower on the electrolyte scale with 25 milligrams of sodium. $1.40, Hammernutrition.com

More nutrition reviews from Triathlete.com

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Faces In The Pack: Age Grouper Emily Holcroft http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/05/features/faces-in-the-pack-age-grouper_132220 Sat, 28 May 2016 01:00:36 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=132220

Emily Holcroft. Photo: Kelli Wilke Photography

A couple health scares couldn’t keep this age-grouper from racing her first triathlon.

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A couple health scares couldn’t keep this age-grouper from racing her first triathlon.

At 41 years old, Emily Holcroft was in the shape of her life while training for her first triathlon. A year prior, the nurse and mother of four almost lost her life when an artery was nicked during a hysterectomy. “After a long recovery, I made up my mind that I was going to live life and get back to the things I once loved prior to having children,” she says. “Knowing that running wasn’t my strength, a friend recommended looking into a triathlon.”

While training for that first triathlon in August 2013, she started noticing shortness of breath during her workouts—her bike rides went from 25 miles to 5 miles; she could barely swim 500 yards when she was used to swimming 3600 and her 3-mile runs were reduced to a half mile. Then she started having pain in her left arm. “I was extremely frustrated—I thought I pulled my bicep muscle while swimming,” she says. “Never in a million years was an impending heart attack on my radar.”

The morning of her heart attack, four weeks out from the race, she was barely able to swim one length of the pool, and her coworker insisted she go to the ER, where she was diagnosed as having a panic attack and sent home with a prescription for anti-anxiety medication. Two hours later, she collapsed on her living room floor. She woke up three days later in the ICU after having emergency open-heart surgery for a quadruple bypass. Despite no family history of heart disease, she was diagnosed with coronary artery disease.

“My cardiac surgeon was standing at the end of my bed and all I can remember saying to him was, ‘Does this mean I can’t do my triathlon?’” Holcroft recalls. “He smiled and said, ‘No, not this year.’” Even so, a month later, barely able to walk, she showed up on race morning to pick up her race number and swag—if they wouldn’t refund her registration fee, she wanted to at least enjoy the pre-race celebration.

During the following two years, Holcroft underwent cardiac rehab and faced several setbacks along the way. “But if anyone knows me, they know that I’m not a quitter,” she says. She was finally able to race her first triathlon in June 2015 at the Tri-It Festival in Bear, Del. “Crossing over that finish line was the most exhilarating feeling I could have ever imagined,” she says. She raced four triathlons in her first season, finishing on the podium in her age group in two of them.

Her biggest motivation has come from finding fulfilling friendships in her tri club and the bonus of training and racing with her husband. “It has strengthened our marriage and is inspiring for our children,” she says.

Holcroft, who lives in Middleton, Del., is signed up for five short-course races in 2016 and would like to do a half-Ironman in 2017. “And, of course, I have the full Ironman dream!” she says. “We’ll see what God has in store. But I know one thing for sure—when I do sign up for an Ironman, it won’t be on the East Coast. I’m going tropical!”

RELATED – Faces In The Pack: Team Every Man Jack’s Ritch Viola

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A Kona Qualifier Shares Her Pre-Ironman Fueling Strategy http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/nutrition/kona-qualifier-shares-pre-ironman-fueling-strategy_130881 Mon, 18 Apr 2016 21:42:54 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=130881

A Kona-qualifying athlete and entrepreneur shares how she fuels the night before and morning of her race.

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A Kona-qualifying athlete and entrepreneur shares how she fuels the night before and morning of her race.

Kate Weiler, 33

Location
Splits time between Concord, Mass. and Winooski, Vt.

Occupation
Co-founder and CEO of DRINKmaple

Standout results
Has finished six Ironmans, including the 2013 Ironman World Championship

Backstory
Weiler started racing triathlons in 2006. After competing in Ironman Mont-Tremblant, Weiler and her training partner Jeff Rose came up with the idea to found DRINKmaple, a company selling naturally hydrating maple water. The brand has since grown from a Boston-based start-up to a national brand.

RELATED: Triathlete’s 2016 Fuel Awards

How I Fuel

“I stick to foods that I know I can easily digest, and I stay away from inflammation-causing foods. I avoid gluten and dairy.”

“For dinner, I skip the traditional pasta dinner and eat white rice, a sweet potato and either chicken or grilled shrimp. I stay away from my typical huge plate of vegetables and have a small portion of spinach. I add Himalayan pink salt to my food to make sure that I have enough sodium to avoid cramping on race day.”

“For breakfast, I love DeLand bagels, which are gluten-free and made out of millet and don’t have a lot of the junk ingredients, unlike some other gluten-free products. These only have four ingredients: organic millet flour, baking powder, filtered water, sea salt. I always pack them when I travel to races.”

“I love maple water because it is low in sugar but also has electrolytes that help hydrate the body. The first time I discovered maple water in Canada, I hydrated with it the days leading up to the Ironman race. That was the race where I qualified for Kona.”

RELATED: How To Plan An Ironman Nutrition Strategy

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Triathlete’s 2016 Fuel Awards http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/nutrition/triathletes-2016-fuel-awards_130706 Fri, 15 Apr 2016 17:57:46 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=130706

Photo: Oliver Backer

We've done the tastebud test for you and now we're sharing our top picks for recently released nutrition products in five major categories.

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Does the exploding sports nutrition market leave you overwhelmed by options? Good news: The Triathlete staff has done the tastebud test for you, sampling a few dozen of the newest products and flavors, all launched in 2015 or early 2016. Here are our top picks in five major categories.

Sports Drinks

Nuun Energy Mango Orange
Why we chose it: Super portable tube, refreshing flavor
We dig the newest flavor of Nuun Energy, a slightly tangy, thirst-quenching citrus flavor—we actually looked forward to drinking it on rides. The gluten-free effervescent electrolyte drink tablets, which dissolve in 16 ounces of water, contain a small amount of dextrose to aid in fluid absorption, plus caffeine (derived from green tea) and B vitamins, and are sweetened with stevia and monk fruit. $6.99 for 10-tablet tube, Nuun.com

Enduro Beta Red Pre-Workout Performance Formula
Why we chose it: Mild-tasting, nitrate-rich
Maybe you’ve heard about the sports performance benefits of beets but are (understandably) hesitant to swig straight beet juice? This all-natural drink from Enduro is a tasty, easy way to reap the benefits of the root veggie—it may have an intense bright red color, but it has a surprisingly mild taste. $38 for 20 servings, Endurobites.com

VFuel Endurance Black Cherry Cola Drink Mix
Why we chose it: Flavor originality
Who doesn’t love cherry cola? This caffeine-free drink tastes great—but not soda-sweet—and packs an electrolyte punch (sea salt is the second ingredient after non-GMO dextrose). It’s higher in calories (200 per packet) and carbohydrates (49 grams). $27 for 12 packets, Vfuel.com

RELATED: The Stories Behind Triathlon’s Unique Brand Names

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A New Chapter: One Age-Grouper’s 200 Pound Weight Loss Journey http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/features/new-chapter-one-age-groupers-200-pound-weight-loss-journey_130676 Wed, 13 Apr 2016 23:38:10 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=130676

January 13, 2016 - Parsippany-Troy Hills, NJ : Rick Nisbet poses for a portrait in Veterans Memorial Park in Parsippany-Troy Hills, New Jersey, on January 13. Nisbet started running to lose weight and today is an avid triathlete. CREDIT: Karsten Moran for Triathlete Magazine

New Jersey triathlete Rick Nisbet shares how he lost more than 200 pounds and regained control over his life—plus, his tips for newbies.

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Running and triathlon helped a New Jersey age-grouper lose more than 200 pounds and regain control over his life.

In June 2007, Rick Nisbet tipped the scales at 389 pounds and had become as unhappy as he was unhealthy. “I was a heart attack waiting to happen,” he says.

The Clifton, N.J., resident’s low point came at his work’s annual Christmas party, when a quarter-mile walk between the chartered bus and a docked boat for the party left Nisbet huffing and puffing—his back was killing him and his heart felt like it was going to jump out of his chest.

After a family member was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, his wife, who was overweight as well, convinced him they both needed to turn their lives around.

So they signed up for a weight-loss program. Through it, Nisbet learned healthy eating habits, portion control, planning and how making small changes can make a big difference.

He added exercise into his weight-loss routine, and after losing his first 100 pounds, Nisbet got the “itch” to run. Even though he’d been very active when he was younger, his activity level had decreased as his weight increased. He planned to run his first 5K, and two months later, when he crossed the finish line, “I threw my hands up like I won the New York City Marathon,” he says. “I found my new passion as an endurance athlete.”

He worked up to a marathon over the years and ended up losing a total of 213 pounds, which he’s kept off for six years. The 46-year-old is now holding steady at 176 pounds, and his outlook has forever changed. “As I was losing weight, a whole new world was opening for me,” he says. “I was becoming a happier person, people were treating me better, and I was getting control over a certain portion of my life.”

Nisbet says he rediscovered his “inner athlete” through running—it brought out his competitive side, and he loved seeing his times get faster. “It was like a drug!” he says.

He initially started doing triathlon to bridge the gap between the spring and fall running seasons, but now, he says, they’re a way of life. “Triathlons are playing a big part in keeping the weight off,” he says. He loves how diverse multisport athletes are in both body type and mindset, and he’s enjoying the variety and challenge of balancing three disciplines.

“When I was just doing half-marathons and marathons, I always got caught up with just getting my miles in,” Nisbet says. “Triathlons provide new challenges.”

After racing his first full season of triathlon, he’s signed up for his first half-Ironman at 70.3 Atlantic City. He’s surprised even himself with how far he’s come. “I found out during my journey that I can achieve anything,” he says. “I also get a charge off of proving people wrong.”

RELATED: Matt Lieto’s Weight-Loss Journey And Tips

A Mind for Success

Nisbet offers this advice to newbies:
1. Set small, attainable goals. “This will give you a sense of accomplishment. Success in the short term will give you the confidence to achieve long-term success.”

2. Embrace change. “Life is a book—some chapters are big and some small. You write the chapters. Close the chapter on the old you and open a new one of the healthier you.”

3. Be patient. “Don’t expect to hit it out of the park—it’s a process, just like everything else. It is a lifestyle, just like eating healthy. They work hand in hand.”

4. Don’t be afraid to ask for help. “There are millions of people that will be willing to help. It is one big community.”

RELATED – How I Qualified: An Age Grouper Shares His Kona Journey

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2016 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide: Transition Bags http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/gear-tech/2016-triathlete-buyers-guide-transition-bags-2_130429 Thu, 07 Apr 2016 21:32:32 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=130429

Decrease pre-race stress by staying organized! We share our six picks for transition bags.

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Decrease pre-race stress by staying organized. Check out our six picks for transition bags.

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4 Chew-Worthy Gums (And Gummies) For Athletes http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/nutrition/chew-worthy-gums-athletes_130396 Wed, 06 Apr 2016 19:43:43 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=130396

Photo: John David Becker

Try one of these four chew-worthy gums (and gummies).

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Try one of these four chew-worthy gums (and gummies). 

Run Gum

The idea behind this “performance gum,” developed by Olympian runner Nick Symmonds, is that you can provide your body with energy in the form of caffeine, taurine and B vitamins without having anything sitting in your gut during a workout. Each package comes with two pieces of sugar- and calorie-free gum for 100 milligrams of caffeine. It’s now available in a tasty cinnamon flavor (in addition to mint and fruit).
$18 for 12-pack, Getrungum.com

RELATED: 5 Good-For-You Cereals

Glee Gum

With the texture and delicious flavor of other gums but without all the junk, this natural chewing gum with a hard shell was a winner. It’s sweetened with Fair Trade cane sugar and brown rice syrup, made with natural chicle (as is Simply Gum) and comes in a recyclable box. Available in multiple flavors such as bubblegum, spearmint and tangerine (taste tester favorite), the only drawback of this non-GMO gum is that the flavor is somewhat short-lived.
$12 for12 boxes, Gleegum.com

RELATED: Our Favorite Bars

Supercandy

More energy chew than gum (note this is the only one on the list that is meant to be swallowed), these sugar-coated gummies taste like candy. Made with only natural flavors and colors, they pack B vitamins, antioxidants and electrolytes in addition to 21 grams of carbohydrates and 90 calories per package. They function well for fueling workouts—the coating keeps them from sticking to your teeth or the package.
$1.49, Snapsupercandy.com for stores

RELATED: 4 Fruit-Flavored Energy Bites

Simply Gum

The appeal isn’t in the appearance of these gum “pellets”—it’s in the short, all-natural ingredient list (better for you and the environment). Available in six flavors, such as maple, ginger and coffee, Simply Gum comes in a perfect size and texture (bubble blowers will approve). The pleasantly sweet flavor doesn’t last exceptionally long, but you can pop another one guilt-free.
$2.99, Simplygum.com

RELATED: 3 Pouches For Quick Nutrition

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Sneak Peek: Triathlete Magazine’s May 2016 Issue http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/magazine/sneak-peek-triathlete-magazines-may-2016-issue_130273 Tue, 05 Apr 2016 17:50:32 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=130273

In our May “Travel Issue,” you’ll find both a list of readers must-do races around the world.

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Look for the issue on newsstands now, or buy the digital version now.

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Loving Right Now: Dark Bark Chocolate With A Unique Design http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/03/nutrition/loving-right-now-dark-bark-chocolate-with-a-unique-design_129311 Thu, 10 Mar 2016 13:56:22 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=129311

We were (naturally) intrigued by the tiny bicycle design on this dark chocolate bark, handmade in Napa Valley, Calif.

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We were (naturally) intrigued by the tiny bicycle design on this dark chocolate bark, handmade in Napa Valley, Calif., but we were sold once we read the ingredient list of Kollar Fuel chocolate ($7.50 for 2.5 ounces, Kollarchocolates.com). Packed with tasty nuts (almonds, hazelnuts, peanuts, macadamia nuts, pecans) and seeds (pumpkin, sunflower, flax) plus raisins and corn flakes, this specialty chocolate has a satisfying crunchy texture and deliciously rich flavor. It would make a perfect Valentine’s Day gift for the triathlete or cyclist in your life—or a tasty, protein-rich treat any time of the year.

RELATED: Healthful Ways To Indulge Your Chocolate Cravings

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2016 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide On Newsstands http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/03/news/2016-triathlete-buyers-guide-on-newsstands_129299 Wed, 09 Mar 2016 20:37:18 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=129299

The 2016 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide features reviews of 143 different triathlon-related products in more than a dozen categories.

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Looking to get some new gear for the 2016 triathlon racing season? Look no farther than the 2016 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide, which features reviews of 143 different triathlon-related products in more than a dozen categories.

On the cover is the 2016 Argon 18 E-119 Tri+, which readers have the chance to win through a sweepstakes at Triathlete.com/winthisbike. The top-of-the-line bike is valued at $12,250.

Among the categories included are triathlon bikes, run shoes, wetsuits, wheels, cycling shoes, goggles, power meters and aerobars. You’ll also find gear buying advice throughout the issue, such as tips for finding a well-fitting wetsuit and the advantages and disadvantages of using a road bike with aerobars.

Among the expert reviewers are a bike fitter, an Ultraman finisher and multiple Ironman athletes. If you want to find a piece of tri gear expertly reviewed and that will fit your budget, the Buyer’s Guide is your resource.

RELATED: Win The 2016 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide Cover Bike

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TriathlEats Recipe: Chicken Afritada http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/03/nutrition/triathleats_129180 Tue, 08 Mar 2016 15:27:25 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=129180

Photo: Clare Barboza

Refuel with this hearty tomato-based chicken stew, a favorite in Filipino cuisine.

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Refuel with this hearty tomato-based chicken stew, a favorite in Filipino cuisine.

Ingredients
1½ pounds chicken, cut into strips or 1-inch cubes
1 large potato, cut into 1-inch cubes
1 large carrot, peeled and cut into 1-inch chunks
1 medium red bell pepper, cut into 1-inch squares
1 medium onion, chopped
¼ cup green peas (can use frozen peas)
4 cloves garlic, minced
Half can (8 oz) tomato sauce
1 T fish sauce
Salt, to taste
3 T vegetable oil
White or brown rice (cooked)

Directions
Heat vegetable oil in a pan over medium-high heat. Sauté potatoes, carrots and bell pepper for about 5 minutes (until knife tender). Once cooked, remove from pan, leaving the remaining juices and oil in the pan, and set aside. Using the same pan, turn heat down to medium and sauté garlic and onion for about 3 minutes—be careful not to burn the garlic. Add the chicken and turn heat to medium-high to sear. Turn heat down to medium-low heat and let simmer for 10–15 minutes or until tender, stirring occasionally. The chicken should be almost fully cooked. Add the fish sauce and cook for 2–3 minutes. Add 1¼ cups water and the tomato sauce and bring to a boil on medium-high heat, then let it simmer for 5 minutes on medium heat. Add back the cooked vegetables plus the peas, and simmer for another 5 minutes. Add salt to taste. Remove from heat, and serve over steamed white or brown rice. Makes 3–4 servings.

Chef Tips

To make this dish vegan, use tofu as the protein and replace the fish sauce with soy sauce.

To make it gluten-free, use gluten-free soy sauce.

If you don’t have rice, try serving over whole-wheat pasta or quinoa.

RELATED: 7-Day Meal Plan For Triathletes

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Triathlon Saved Me: 3 Age Groupers’ Inspiring Comeback Stories http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/02/features/triathlon-saved-me-age-groupers-inspring-stories_128623 Thu, 25 Feb 2016 20:28:12 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=128623

Meet three triathletes who used triathlon to bring themselves back to health and happiness.

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Meet three age-groupers who, after hitting rock bottom in their individual battles with alcoholism, PTSD and anxiety, used triathlon to bring themselves back to health and happiness.

Overcoming Alcoholism

Southern California native Rochelle Moncourtois woke up one day with a ferocious hangover after another night of heavy, blackout drinking. She was 26 years old, and her battle with alcohol, which had started seven years prior, had left her with multiple DUI’s on her record and a 30-day (unsuccessful) rehab stint.

Since graduating high school, she had lost her purpose—she’d stopped dancing, a passion she’d had since age 3. In between binges, she’d managed to become an aesthetician, run half and full marathons and get her personal training certification. But none of that took her away from alcohol—until that day in 2011.

“I woke up and realized I didn’t remember anything from the night before and that I couldn’t carry on like that anymore,” she recalls. “I really wanted my life to change. I didn’t like the person I had become. … I went into my backyard, threw a bottle of wine and I told myself I was going to make a change that day.”

Moncourtois emphasizes that she didn’t grow up in a broken, dysfunctional home, as many people assume when they hear about her drinking—she had loving and supportive parents who navigated the battle with her. It was the stresses of competitive dancing that drove her to alcohol: “I felt a lot of pressure to look a certain way, for dance specifically,” she says. “Because of all the pressure, I started to fall into a major depression, and I actually became bulimic through all of it. Then I turned to the alcohol—it was my way to escape from all those pressures.”

Her parents and friends started to notice a change in her. She lost interest in dance, started lying and became manipulative. She was ticketed with DUI’s twice and voluntarily underwent her first 30-day rehab program, in Hollywood. “I was just going through the motions to kind of please everyone else around me,” she says, “but I knew that wasn’t really the end of my drinking.” She stayed sober for about five months before falling back into her old habit, at which point she blacked out pretty much every time she drank.

It was after that return to drinking that she decided to make a lasting change and check herself into another rehab program, this time going into it “full force with the goal to get sober and change my life.”

In 2008, in the middle of her battle with alcohol, she had become friends with her spin class instructor, Kim Melvin, who was the person who encouraged her to start running in her early 20s. Moncourtois watched her friend complete an Ironman, and even though she was still drinking heavily, it became a dream of hers to one day finish an Ironman as well. In fact, during her second rehab stint, she named it as one of her post-rehab goals and registered for the race the day she got home. She started her seven months of triathlon training when she was 90 days sober.

With Melvin’s help as a training partner, Moncourtois crossed the finish line of the iron-distance 2012 Full Vineman in Sonoma County, Calif., in 14:25:12. “I never wanted to touch alcohol again after I crossed that finish line,” she says. “I know what a lot of people experience, they say [an Ironman finish] is life-changing. But for me, it saved my life. I wasn’t even a year sober yet, so if I didn’t have Ironman, I don’t even know if I would have made it through that first year.”

Now 30 years old, Moncourtois works as a personal trainer and fitness instructor and is getting married in 2016. She’s in the final stages of publishing a book about her life journey with the goal of helping others who’ve faced similar struggles. She’ll be racing Ironman 70.3 St. George this year, and down the road, after she has kids, she’d like to complete another Ironman. “I want to do another Ironman to show my kids what you’re capable of,” she says. “I want them to know that anything is possible and for them to see what changed my life, and to show other women out there you can still achieve your goals and dreams after having kids.”

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5 Yoga Poses For Triathletes http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/02/training/5-yoga-poses-for-triathletes_128497 Tue, 23 Feb 2016 22:04:20 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=128497

Counteract your body's imbalances from triathlon's repetitive movements with these poses, designed specifically for triathletes.

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Counteract your body’s imbalances from triathlon’s repetitive movements with these poses, designed specifically for triathletes.

This winter, your weekly workout routine could benefit from a few simple yoga poses. “Triathlon training requires repetitive movement that creates imbalances in the body,” says Sage Rountree, a triathlete, coach and author of the recently released Everyday Yoga. “Practices like yoga help balance strength and flexibility to ward off injury and help you recover faster.”

If you’re not an experienced yogi, the off-season is the perfect time to try new things. Rountree recommends finding a Yoga 101 or Yoga Basics class to learn proper alignment before starting an at-home routine.

Perform the poses and sequences below in this order for a balanced, all-purpose yoga routine. Do this sequence three to four times a week in both the off-season and in season. As you approach your “A” race, reduce the amount of time you spend in the strength poses and instead focus on the final two poses.

1. Crescent Lunge

Purpose: Builds strength in the front lower leg and glutes while cultivating flexibility in the hip flexors of the back leg. This translates to a more fluid stroke and stride, and less stress on your back. How to: Hold for 10 breaths each side.

RELATED: How To Fit Yoga Into Your Training Cycle

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5 Good-For-You Cereals http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/02/nutrition/5-good-for-you-cereals_128537 Tue, 23 Feb 2016 20:33:07 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=128537

Photo: John David Becker

Change up your morning meal with one of these tasty, good-for-you cereals or granolas.

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Change up your morning meal with one of these tasty, good-for-you cereals or granolas. 

1. Wildway Grain-Free Granola

A great option for those who enjoy topping their yogurt with healthful granola but can’t eat gluten, this granola is made with all whole-food ingredients such as dried fruit, nuts and seeds. The texture is softer and chewier than the typical oat-based granola, and it comes in multiple top-notch flavors, such as Coconut Cashew (testers liked that one straight out of the bag, trail mix-style) and hearty Apple Cinnamon. $7.99, Wildwayoflife.com

RELATED: Make Your Own Granola Bar

2. Peace Cereal Baobab Coconut

The crunchiness and mix of wheat flakes and whole grain oat clusters make this almost a blend of cereal and granola, perfect for mixing with milk or topping yogurt. The organic blend is mildly sweet and features coconut, almonds, honey and the superfruit baobab among its ingredients. $4.99, Peacecereal.com for stores

RELATED – Recipe Of The Week: Coconut Chia Pudding

3. Earnest Eats Energized Hot Cereal

This new oatmeal is made with a “supergrain” blend of oats, quinoa and amaranth in a microwaveable cup. Each flavor (shown in Mocha Nut) is made with 97 percent organic ingredients and is made with whole foods such as sunflower seeds, dried fruit and cinnamon plus coffee fruit, which adds a caffeine boost. Taste testers were fans of the not-too-sweet taste and mix of crunchy and soft textures (and convenience of the cup!). $2.99, Earnesteats.com

RELATED: 5 Foods For Recovery

4. Love Grown Foods Power O’s

The team at Love Grown Foods is promoting beans for breakfast—yes, beans. This toasted “O” cereal is made with navy beans, garbanzo beans and lentils and is surprisingly tasty—sweet with a savory undertone. The non-GMO ingredient list is a great source of filling fiber and protein. Opt for the honey flavor in your favorite milk. $4.99, Lovegrownfoods.com

RELATED: 4 Healthy Winter Breakfasts

5. Barbara’s Puffins

These puffed, crunchy squares are a favorite around the Triathlete offices. Taste testers love the non-GMO, wheat-free cereal mixed with milk or as a midday snack straight from the box. Try the peanut butter or cinnamon flavors. $5.49, Barbaras.com

RELATED: The Benefits Of Eating A Big Breakfast

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