Julia Polloreno – Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com Triathlon Training, Gear, Nutrition, Photos, Race Results & Calendars Sun, 28 Aug 2016 21:13:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.5.2 Your Chance To Train With “The Man” Dave Scott http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/08/news/chance-train-man-dave-scott_135555 Thu, 11 Aug 2016 20:26:08 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=135555

Photo: Rob Klingensmith

Dave Scott is partnering up with the Four Seasons Hualalai on the Kona-Kohala coast to host the Dave Scott Triathlon Experience.

The post Your Chance To Train With “The Man” Dave Scott appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Kona is a special place for Ironman Hall of Famer Dave Scott. It’s where he won six world titles, and this summer he’s partnering up with the Four Seasons Hualalai on the Kona-Kohala coast to host the Dave Scott Triathlon Experience. The five-day camps, which take place Aug. 15–20 and 22–27, will include “purpose-driven” swim, bike, run and mobility/strength training sessions with Scott; video stroke analysis; nutritional guidance; gourmet meals; a gift bag that includes triathlon apparel and shoes; luxury accommodations; and a lot of one-on-one time with the Ironman U Master Coach.

“The premise is not to smash you—it’s to make you more efficient and economical,” says Scott, who runs a successful coaching business in Boulder, Colo. “A lot of folks have a limited amount of time, so what can you do on your training days that optimizes your time?” Scott says that his “learn by doing” and highly targeted approach to training sessions will benefit athletes of all abilities.

Scott, who raced Ironman with great success as a vegetarian, believes diet in and out of training is an important part of the equation, so his camp will also focus on helping people shift from an overly processed, high-carbohydrate and sugar-based diet to one rich in healthy fats. Four Seasons chefs will prepare meals in line with Scott’s diet philosophy using a bounty of locally-sourced ingredients.

Scott will call every camper prior to arrival in Kona to get a better picture of his or her training history and goals, and each person will leave camp with a custom training plan. Registration is capped at 12 people per camp.

Fourseasons.com; $8,275

RELATED – Never A Bad Day: Dave Scott’s Signature Style

The post Your Chance To Train With “The Man” Dave Scott appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Triathlon Tour Guide: Austin http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/07/features/triathlon-tour-guide-austin_134602 Thu, 21 Jul 2016 13:26:23 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=134602

Athletes compete at TriRock Austin. Photo: Nils Nilsen

Tune in to a lively multisport scene in this vibrant music capital.

The post Triathlon Tour Guide: Austin appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Tune in to a lively multisport scene in this vibrant music capital.

GO
Central Texas can really heat up in the summer, so plan your visit before or after the hottest months of July and August. With popular longstanding races held here on both Memorial Day and Labor Day weekends, Austin is the perfect spot to enjoy a long holiday/race weekend.

FLY
Austin-Bergstrom International Airport is conveniently located just 10 minutes from downtown Austin, and offers a number of non-stop flights from most carriers to and from major U.S. cities.

STAY
Located on bustling South Congress Avenue, both Hotel San Jose (Sanjosehotel.com) and South Congress Hotel (Southcongresshotel.com) are upscale boutique hotels with a modern-chic-meets-artistic-Austin aesthetic. This is where you go to sample the city’s über-fashionable scene, especially during music festival season. Closer to downtown, the Hyatt Regency Austin (Austin.regency.hyatt) is a popular host hotel for local races and overlooks Lady Bird Lake.

RELATED PHOTOS: 2015 TriRock Austin

Train Like an Austinite

Splash-N-Dash
On the third Tuesday of the month (from April through October), Pure Austin gym (Pureaustin.com) hosts a swim-run race at its Quarry Lake. Racers ranging from local pros to weekend warriors swim a 750-meter loop and then run three loops (3K) around the lake.

Barton Springs Pool
You’ll never want to return to your chlorine pool back home after swimming in Barton Springs Pool. Three acres in size, this emerald-colored spring-fed pool averages 68–70 degrees year-round. Unsupervised swim is free daily from 5 a.m.–8 a.m. (closed Thursday), otherwise you can pay an $8 admission fee to swim until 9 p.m. before it opens back up for free swim for another hour before closing for the day.

Ride Like a Local
Check the Bike Austin site (austincycling.org/rides) for a current calendar of local rides of varying length, terrain and pace. Mellow Johnny’s Bike Shop (Austin.mellowjohnnys.com) hosts numerous rides each week for riders of all abilities. Make sure to visit the adjacent Juan Pelota Café to get your pre-ride coffee fix. Local tri shop Austin Tri Cyclist (Austintricyclist.com) also organizes a popular Saturday morning ride with 30- and 50-mile options.

Music To Our Ears

Sixth Street Sounds
You can’t come to the self-proclaimed live music capital of the world and not check out the Sixth Street corridor of bars, eateries and music venues. Go to 6street.com for a listing of upcoming musical acts and profiles of local live music establishments. From karaoke to craft brews, there’s no shortage of options.

Food Trucks Galore
The Austin food truck scene is downright impressive—from world-famous BBQ to artisan ice cream, the offerings are endless. Find clusters of food trucks on Congress Avenue and Sixth Street, or on most any corner lot. Austin is also home to Whole Foods HQ, and devotees of this natural foods grocer won’t want to skip a visit. You could spend an entire day eating and drinking your way through the flagship store. Another culinary highlight: Perla’s on Congress Ave. for fresh oysters and craft cocktails on the breezy patio.

RELATED – Triathlon Tour Guide: Bend, Oregon

Race it!

The best way to explore the urban heart of Austin is by toeing the line at one of the city’s popular triathlons. Bookending the summer, Life Time Tri CapTex (Memorial Day weekend) and TriRock Austin (Labor Day weekend) have athletes swimming in Lady Bird Lake and biking and running downtown streets in the shadow of the stately capital building. Off-road enthusiasts should take to Texas Hill Country for Pure Austin Fitness XTERRA Muleshoe Triathlon on June 11.

More Triathlon Tour Guides

The post Triathlon Tour Guide: Austin appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Life Time Tri Boulder Peak Announces $25,000 Relay Purse http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/06/news/life-time-tri-boulder-peak-announces-25000-relay-purse_133214 Tue, 14 Jun 2016 18:42:42 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=133214

Photo: Life Time Fitness

The Life Time Tri Boulder Peak Triathlon announced a new $25,000 relay competition in addition to the traditional International distance

The post Life Time Tri Boulder Peak Announces $25,000 Relay Purse appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
In celebration of its 25th year, the Life Time Tri Boulder Peak Triathlon announced a new $25,000 relay competition in addition to the traditional International distance race.

‘Fastest Pros’ $25K Relay Competition

The nation’s fastest athletes will combine forces and descend upon Boulder in July for their shot at winning $25,000 – one of the world’s largest multisport relay purses. Top female and male relay teams will each earn $8,000, with payouts to the next two fastest teams of $3,000 and $1,500 respectively. This is an open competition, and each relay team must be comprised entirely of women or men. One person will represent each team within the swim, bike and run disciplines along the existing Boulder Peak course.

‘Average Joes’ $25 Relay

Also in celebration of 25 years of the Life Time Tri Boulder Peak, ‘Average Joe’s’ or all non-elite athletes, can form their own relay team and take part in the fun for as little as $25 each or $75 per team if they register before Friday, July 1, 2016. Average Joe relay teams may consist of two or three individuals of any gender, and assigned to one of 10 unique divisions including Families, Foodies, Breweries, etc. One person will represent each team within the swim, bike and run disciplines along the existing Boulder Peak course.

“The Boulder Peak Triathlon is such a legendary and iconic race that we wanted to do something exciting for its 25th year that pays homage to its rich history and also welcomes new athletes interested in triathlon,” says Gladys Cueto, Life Time Tri Boulder Peak Race Director. “Not only can the fastest pros in each discipline join forces in an exciting relay division but we’re also offering a great deal for all levels of athletes and single sport athletes to get involved in the relay division for just $75 per team. It’s going to be a day to remember for everyone.”

$25,000 Giveaway

Following the awards ceremony, all participants will have their own shot at earning $25,000 in assorted prizes from Jaybird, Panasonic, Voler, 2017 race entries, gift cards and more. The traditional International distance triathlon along with the Olde Stage King/Queen of the Mountain Competition will be taking place in addition to the relay competition and registration is still open for athletes looking to compete as an individual in the legendary race.

Registration

Registration is currently open for both individuals and relay teams at Boulderpeaktri.com. The special rate of $75 per relay team is available until Friday, July 1, 2016. Early registration is encouraged for all divisions, as the race is expected to sell out.

The post Life Time Tri Boulder Peak Announces $25,000 Relay Purse appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Faces In The Pack: Kona Qualifier Caroline Lea http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/06/features/faces-in-the-pack-kona-qualifier-caroline-lea_132895 Thu, 09 Jun 2016 13:37:41 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=132895

Caroline Lea. Photo: Nils Nilsen

The former collegiate soccer player's key to success? Keep it fun and balanced.

The post Faces In The Pack: Kona Qualifier Caroline Lea appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
A former collegiate soccer player at UC Berkeley, the California Bay Area triathlete found a new athletic passion when she interned for the organizers of Escape From Alcatraz. Last year, the 30-year-old raced Ironman Canada, where she finished as the first amateur woman and punched her ticket to Kona. Her key to success? Keep it fun and balanced.

I grew up playing soccer because my older brother and sister did, and I just wanted to do anything to hang out with them. It quickly turned into an obsession, and I earned a scholarship to play at UC Berkeley, where I was a four-year starter and a member of the U-21 National Team. Triathlon has been a great competitive outlet for me since I hung up my cleats a few years ago.

While I was at Cal, I had a summer internship with IMG, and we managed the Escape From Alcatraz Triathlon. The whole experience planted the triathlon seed in my mind. When I saw the athletes emerge from the water and hop on their bikes, I had goosebumps. It was the most intense spectator moment I’d ever experienced, and I immediately knew I would do triathlons one day. It took rehabbing a torn ACL/MCL, retiring from soccer and a couple more years, but I did my first sprint triathlon in 2010 [Santa Barbara]. I didn’t really start training seriously until early 2014, when I decided to sign up for my first full Ironman [Coeur d’Alene].

When I raced Ironman Canada last year, we had a lot happening in our lives. Job transitions, planning a wedding, family illness, the sudden death of a friend. My Kona aspirations had dwindled significantly, but [my husband, my coach and I] decided to give it a go anyway. The weather ended up being horrendous with a downpour for most of the race, but I barely noticed it. I raced my own race, and spent 10-plus hours thinking about so many things beyond triathlon. As I was finishing, I felt a huge weight lifted, my eyes flooded with tears and I felt so incredibly content. I think my lack of obsession over results allowed for my best race yet.

I’m coached by Matt Dixon of Purplepatch Fitness. He manages to bring the perfect amount of humor, intensity and education. He’s helped me be more patient with my training, and helped me to begin to realize my potential. I’m also a member of the Olympic Club Triathlon team in San Francisco. We have a great group that enjoys training together. We do weekend rides, spin class and the occasional run/swim together. My husband is a very talented triathlete, turned (mostly) cyclist. He and his friends are great about letting me tag along for rides.

Usually Mondays are very light with either an easy swim or spin, followed by strength work. Tuesdays and Thursdays, I swim at 5:30 a.m., then run later in the day after work. Wednesdays and Fridays are usually an early morning trainer session in my garage, followed by a run. The weekend is where the real work happens. On Saturdays we usually do a 4–5-hour ride, with the occasional run. On Sundays we do a two-hour swim, followed by a longer, low-intensity run. This usually ends up being about 15-plus hours per week, and—real talk—there are plenty of weeks when I don’t perfectly execute the plan!

I raced Ironman 70.3 Lake Stevens in 2014 and forgot to pack a wetsuit, so we bought an old rental from a local bike shop. It had holes everywhere and cost $30, but there was no way I was doing that swim without a wetsuit—I need all the help I can get.

My goal for triathlon is [to] continue doing it for many years to come, and never feel like I have “peaked,” which is my biggest fear. Even as my times become slower, I never want to feel too stagnant or comfortable. I want to continue to push myself and know that I am racing and training in a smarter, better way as I grow older. Beyond triathlon, I want to have a few kiddos, start my own business and one day venture into ultrarunning.

My go-to recovery meal is a burrito—every time. When I’m trying to be healthier, I mix up a Fitppl smoothie. The cocoa and blueberry is real tasty.

RELATED: A Kona Qualifier Shares Her Pre-Ironman Fueling Strategy

Lea’s Lessons

“There are no secrets and there are no shortcuts,” Lea says. But there are a few pieces of advice that have helped her along the way:

Don’t take it too seriously too quickly. “Ease into the sport,” she says. “Most of us have plenty of stressors in our lives; don’t pile it on by putting too much pressure on results or outcomes.”

Train with people who are better than you. Don’t be afraid to be the slowest in the group—that’s when you’ll build the character you need to push through the tough moments in races, she says. “When it feels hard, or you’re tired, that’s when you make progress.”

Keep it fun(ny). “While my favorite training buddies are some of the most intense people I know, they are also hilarious,” she says. “Going hard is fun so do that, but just make sure you keep a good sense of humor. I want to train with [pro triathlete] Callum Millward one day, just because I know he’d kick my ass and we’d have a damn good time doing it.”

RELATED – Coach’s Note By Lance Watson: You Can Qualify For Kona!

The post Faces In The Pack: Kona Qualifier Caroline Lea appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
We Tri’d It: Underwater Audio Swimbuds http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/02/gear-tech/we-trid-it-underwater-audio-swimbuds_128383 Wed, 17 Feb 2016 17:46:55 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=128383

Photo: John David Becker

It’s a common complaint among triathletes: Swimming lap after lap in silence can get tedious—quickly.

The post We Tri’d It: Underwater Audio Swimbuds appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
It’s a common complaint among triathletes: Swimming lap after lap in silence can get tedious—quickly. Taking your favorite training tunes underwater can help combat black line-inspired boredom and inject some motivation into your workouts. With four different earbud styles in this set, you can easily dial in the most comfortable fit that gives the tightest waterproof seal. The sound quality was surprisingly impressive—not at all tinny or muted. The simple-to-operate iPod clips onto the goggle strap at the back of the head, and the headphone wires didn’t tangle or annoy over multiple workouts. These sturdy, versatile earbuds might be the only headphones you need for all your training.

Underwater Audio Swimbuds, $70

Underwateraudio.com
(Waterproof iPod sold separately for $125)

RELATED: Learn To Love The Pool (Really!)

The post We Tri’d It: Underwater Audio Swimbuds appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
2016 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide: Cycling Shoes http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/02/2016-buyers-guide/2016-triathlete-buyers-guide-cycling-shoes_128865 Mon, 08 Feb 2016 22:15:18 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=128865

A look at the eight shoes featured in the 2016 Triathlete Buyer's Guide.

The post 2016 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide: Cycling Shoes appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>

$250, Scott-sports.com
The draw: Ergonomic, adjustable insole

This shoe gives you a choice in the amount of arch support you want with the use of an arch insert on the insole (it comes with two options), and a removable button beneath the metatarsal to best match your ideal anatomical fit. The Boa closure system opens wide for quick transitions and allows you to easily adjust tightness with precision. The shoe is ideal for smaller volume and narrower feet.

The post 2016 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide: Cycling Shoes appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
2016 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide: Helmets http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/02/2016-buyers-guide/2016-triathlete-buyers-guide-helmets_128877 Sun, 07 Feb 2016 22:54:24 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=128877

A look at the eight helmets reviewed in the 2016 Triathlete Buyer's Guide.

The post 2016 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide: Helmets appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>

$270, Giro.com
The draw: Safety features and extreme ventilation

Giro claims that extensive testing in the wind tunnel showed that this helmet is nearly as efficient as the top-performing time-trial helmets. Two features that really stood out: an internal “roll cage” that provides added stability around the head, and even internal airflow via 26 vents. The extra $20 for the MIPS safety technology—Multi-directional Impact Protection System (intended to absorb both linear and rotational forces in the event of a crash)—is a worthy spend.

The post 2016 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide: Helmets appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
6 Of Our Favorite Winter Running Tights http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/01/photos/6-of-our-favorite-winter-running-tights_127353 Wed, 13 Jan 2016 17:26:31 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=127353

We welcome the trend of functional tights with a colorful twist.

The post 6 Of Our Favorite Winter Running Tights appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
$(document).ready(function() { $(".fancybox").fancybox({type: 'image', margin : [20, 60, 20, 60]}); });

We welcome the trend of functional tights with a colorful twist. Here are six of our favorite options for winter runs, yoga or just lounging around the house.

RELATED: 9 Winter-Friendly Running Tops

The post 6 Of Our Favorite Winter Running Tights appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
How To Choose Your First Triathlon http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/12/training/choosing-your-first-race_51725 Fri, 18 Dec 2015 16:50:44 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=51725

Photo: TriRock

New to the sport? One of the first things you'll want to do is pick a goal race so you can plot your course of action.

The post How To Choose Your First Triathlon appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
One of the first things you’ll want to do after deciding you want to be a triathlete is pick a goal race so you can plot your course of action. We recommend starting with a sprint-distance race (or even a shorter super-sprint), which will offer a solid challenge to newbies without being too overwhelming. Your race choice should be guided by answering a few other key questions:

What’s your athletic background?

Perhaps you are a runner who’s grown weary of pounding the pavement and want to mix up your training and racing. Or maybe you’ve been inspired to do your first triathlon after watching the NBC broadcast of Ironman, athletic prowess be damned. Either way, you’ll need to chart your course by first making an honest assessment of your athletic background and your unique health/fitness situation. It’s always wise to consult a physician when starting any new exercise regimen, including kick-starting your triathlon training. If you are an active, generally fit person, you’ll need less time—as little as a few weeks—to prepare for your first race and should select a race accordingly. If you don’t have much of an athletic foundation, or have any preexisting health or fitness issues, you’ll want to call in the professionals (physician, coach) to make sure you’re not overcommitting yourself too soon. Every athlete presents a unique case.

Are you a fair-weather competitor?

The triathlon season in the U.S. largely revs up in March and winds down in October. To make your first race a more pleasant experience, you may want to consider choosing a race that occurs when (and where) you can count on temperate, pleasant conditions. You will already have a number of first-time hurdles to overcome, so why not dismiss inclement weather from the equation from the get-go? If cool temps don’t bother you, consider diving into an early-spring race. The perk: Early-season races tend to be more mellow, as competitors are usually just ramping up for the season and use these races as a means to gauge early-season fitness.

RELATED: How To Fuel For Your First Race

Do you have a preference for wearing a wetsuit?

If you’d rather not wear a wetsuit for your first race, you’ll want to choose an event that occurs later in the season, when there’s less likelihood of a wetsuit-required swim. A lot of newbies don’t like how restrictive a wetsuit can feel and want to focus on just tackling the swim without the added hassle of getting in and out of a wetsuit in a short race. On the flip side, some beginners like the added confidence and buoyancy that a wetsuit provides (and figure they may as well get used to wearing a wetsuit anyway), no matter how short the swim leg. Consider your own comfort level when it comes to wearing a wetsuit, and let that factor into your race selection.

Are you looking for a lot of outside support and encouragement to get to the finish?

Or are you one of those rare creatures who is completely self-motivated? A little love from the sidelines on race day can go a long way in your journey to your first-ever finish line, and it’s smart to select a race that has a reputation as a beginner-friendly event, such as the TriRock Series (Trirock.competitor.com). A mellow vibe, extra supportive volunteers and race staff, and a festive atmosphere will make the day that much more enjoyable and memorable. If you really thrive on outside encouragement and camaraderie, join a charity training group where first-timers get help with structuring training (typically a goal race is picked for you) and work together toward a shared goal while benefiting a worthy cause.

RELATED: The Tools For Your First Triathlon

The post How To Choose Your First Triathlon appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Triathlon Tour Guide: Mammoth Lakes, Calif. http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/11/features/triathlon-tour-guide-mammoth-lakes-calif_126291 Mon, 30 Nov 2015 17:30:48 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=126291

The Whitmore pool
Photo: Facebook.com/swimwhitmore

Create your own altitude camp in this Eastern Sierras training haven for endurance athletes.

The post Triathlon Tour Guide: Mammoth Lakes, Calif. appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Create your own altitude camp in this Eastern Sierras training haven for endurance athletes.

GO
Summer through fall, when the triathlon training and racing scene is most active. If you go in late September, you’ll be treated to colorful fall foliage.

FLY
Mammoth Yosemite Airport (Visitmammoth.com/fly) is a 10-minute drive from Mammoth Lakes and is serviced by Alaska Airlines year-round.

STAY
Vrbo.com and Airbnb.com offer a plethora of listings for short-term vacation rentals, and Mammoth Mountain (Mammothmountain.com) has an array of lodging options right in the village at multiple price points.

Swim

Pool With A View
Whitmore Pool (Mammothrecreation.com) is a six-lane 25-meter outdoor pool open mid-May through early September with panoramic mountain views. Snowcreek Athletic Club (Snowcreekathleticclub.com) has an indoor pool (a bit short at 19 meters) and outdoor pool as well as whirlpools. The High Sierra Triathlon Club organizes several swim, bike and run workouts each week, with periodic swims, rides and race simulations at nearby June Lake. Refer to Highsierratriclub.org/calendar for the schedule.

Bike

Where The Locals Go
Mammoth Mountain Bike Park (Mammothmountain.com) is the perfect spot for some fat-tire fun—for the whole family. But if you’d like to stick to the paved roads, there’s no shortage of route options in Mammoth Lakes, and the free bike shuttle is a super convenient amenity. For a map of the Mammoth Lakes Trail System, go to Mammothtrails.org. Eastside Velo Cycling Club (Eastsidevelo.org), sponsor of the Mammoth Fall Century and Gran Fondo, organizes ongoing area rides.

Run

8,000 Feet And Climbing
All running abilities and ages are welcome at Mammoth Track Club (Mammothtrackclub.com) workouts. Check the club’s site for the workout/group run schedule and local races. The Mammoth Lakes Crib (Mammothlakescrib.com), a destination established by Mammoth Lakes Tourism for elite athletes in training, lists common run routes (and other popular training venues) on its website. The scenery along the Paper Route on the side of Mammoth Mountain will distract you from your burning lungs!

RELATED: A Foolproof Guide To Altitude Training

Nom

Refuel, Rehydrate
Reward your workouts with a pint(s) from the Mammoth Brewing Company (Mammothbrewingco.com) taps. Located at the end of a popular mountain biking route (with spaces to rack your rig), Mammoth Brewing is the spot to grab a local brew in the alpine sun. Park yourself on a picnic bench to enjoy one of their seasonal beers or the delicious house-made root beer. There’s also a “gastropub” inside the brewery that serves up pub fare with an upscale twist (flatbread pizzas, kale Caesar salad). The menu at Mammoth Tavern (Mammothtavern.com) features hearty dishes like shepherd’s pie as well as lighter options like the heirloom tomato and watermelon salad—both delicious. The craft cocktail menu alone warrants a visit. For a coffee fix, Looney Bean is a local favorite.

Race It!

The High Sierra Triathlon Club hosts a number of training camps and races, including the bucket-list-worthy June Lake Triathlon (July 9, 2016) and the uniquely formatted Graniteman Challenge (September). To complete the Graniteman Challenge, racers swim 2.4 miles in June Lake on the first day, ride 102 miles the next and run 12.4 miles of Tioga Pass on the third day. Details and registration at Highsierratri.org.

More tour guides

The post Triathlon Tour Guide: Mammoth Lakes, Calif. appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Video: Flora Duffy Defends XTERRA Crown http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/11/video/video-flora-duffy-defends-xterra-crown_125339 Mon, 02 Nov 2015 16:38:17 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=125339

The Olympian from Bermuda defended her XTERRA world title to cap off a breakthrough season.

The post Video: Flora Duffy Defends XTERRA Crown appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
The Olympian from Bermuda defended her XTERRA world title to cap off a breakthrough season.

RELATED VIDEO: XTERRA Defending World Champ Flora Duffy

The post Video: Flora Duffy Defends XTERRA Crown appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Video: Josiah Middaugh Gets First XTERRA World Title http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/11/video/video-josiah-middaugh-gets-first-xterra-world-title_125333 Mon, 02 Nov 2015 16:30:40 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=125333

Josiah Middaugh on the bike.

In his 15th Maui start, Middaugh captured the top spot on the podium and became the first American since 2000 to win the world title.

The post Video: Josiah Middaugh Gets First XTERRA World Title appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
In his 15th Maui start, Middaugh captured the top spot on the podium and became the first American since 2000 to win the XTERRA world title.

RELATED VIDEO – Josiah Middaugh: “I Think This Is The Year”

The post Video: Josiah Middaugh Gets First XTERRA World Title appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Josiah Middaugh And Flora Duffy Wow In Maui http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/11/news/josiah-middaugh-and-flora-duffy-wow-in-maui_125327 Mon, 02 Nov 2015 02:00:10 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=125327

Flora Duffy defends in Maui. Photo: XTERRA

Flora Duffy defends, Josiah Middaugh brings the XTERRA world crown back to the USA after 15 years.

The post Josiah Middaugh And Flora Duffy Wow In Maui appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Flora Duffy defends, Josiah Middaugh brings the XTERRA world crown back to the USA after 15 years.

Fifteenth time was the charm for American Josiah Middaugh of Vail, Colo., who won his first XTERRA World title in his fifteenth start at the Maui race. After finishing second last year to Spaniard Ruben Ruzafa, Middaugh started the run 1:45 down on Ruzafa and steadily closed the gap to finish first in 2:35:32, three minutes ahead of second place finisher Braden Currie of New Zealand. On the women’s side, two-time Olympian and defending champion Flora Duffy of Bermuda led from the start gun through the breaktape, capturing her second consecutive XTERRA world title in 2:54:18, about five minutes ahead of runner-up Lesley Paterson, also a two-time XTERRA world champ.

Men’s Race
Conditions were relatively calm for the 1-mile rough water swim at DT Fleming Beach, skirting the Ritz-Carlton Kapalua property. Aussie Courtney Atkinson was first to hit the beach for the quick sand run that splits up the swim, followed by a group that included German Jens Roth, Aussie Ben Allen, Kiwi Sam Osborne and Mauricio Mendez from Mexico. Atkinson was the first into transition with the fastest swim of 20:53, with the same group of Roth, Allen, Osborne and Mendez following less than a minute behind. Middaugh was 12th out of the water in 23:30, tailed by Ruzafa in 13th, and quickly went to work on the bike to close the gap to the front. By mile 6 of the 20-mile ride, Ruzafa, a former pro mountain biker, had charged to the front with Currie just seconds behind him, as well as Francisco Serrano from Mexico and Middaugh less than a minute behind the defending champion. By mile 13, Middaugh had moved up to second, about 40 seconds down from Ruzafa. As the lead men entered T2, Ruzafa had a 1:45 lead onto the challenging 10K run course. (Last year, Middaugh ran this course two minutes faster than Ruzafa.) Before the first mile of the run, Middaugh had made up 15 seconds on Ruzafa, with Currie still in third. Middaugh overtook Ruzafa by mile 3 and held his position through the breaktape with the second-fastest 10K of the day (41:59) to become the first American in 15 years to win the Maui race. Currie finished second, and Ruzafa rounded out the podium in third.

Women’s Race
In a sea of green caps at the front of the swim, there was a lone pink one—that belonging to Flora Duffy, the ITU racer who finished this year’s series ranked 7th in the world. Duffy swam with the lead men’s pack, exiting the swim alone, but trailed closely by Canadian Christine Jeffrey, Jacqui Slack of the UK, American Emma Garrard and Mexico’s Fabiola Corona. Lesley Paterson was fifth out of the water. By mile 6 of the ride Paterson had moved up to second, 2:10 down on Duffy, followed by Garrard. That 1-2-3 order continued into T2, but by then Paterson had closed the gap to just 1:35. Although Duffy said post-race she struggled throughout the day, she was able to hold off Paterson and the other women with a 46:23 10K, second fastest of the day. Paterson held her position with a 49:36 run, and Garrard ran a race-best 46:09 for third, her best finish place here in Maui. She was also the top American woman for the third straight year.

Complete results here

XTERRA World Championship
Nov. 1, 2015 – Kapalua, Maui
1-mile swim, 10-mile bike, 6.5-mile run

Men
1. Josiah Middaugh (USA) 2:35:32
2. Braden Currie (NZL) 2:38:31
3. Ruben Ruzafa (ESP) 2:40:41
4. Mauricio Mendez (MEX) 2:40:55
5. Courtney Atkinson (AUS) 2:42:28
6. Francisco Serrano (MEX) 2:42:58
7. Yeray Luxem (BEL) 2:44:46
8. Rom Akerson (CRC) 2:45:08
9. Nicolas Fernandez (FRA) 2:46:52
10. Ben Hoffman (USA) 2:49:57

Women
1. Flora Duffy (BER) 2:54:18
2. Lesley Paterson (GBR) 2:59:17
3. Emma Garrard (USA) 3:03:29
4. Myriam Guillot Boisset (FRA) 3:07:28
5. Elizabeth Orchard (NZL) 3:09:58
6. Carina Wasle (AUT) 3:11:24
7. Helena Erbenova (CZE) 3:17:13
8. Jacqui Slack (GBR) 3:18:05
9. Renata Bucher (SUI) 3:19:35
10. Susan Sloane (RSA) 3:20:45

The post Josiah Middaugh And Flora Duffy Wow In Maui appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Post-Kona Update From Ben Hoffman http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/11/video/post-kona-update-from-ben-hoffman_125325 Sun, 01 Nov 2015 17:33:47 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=125325 After a tough day in Kona plagued by stomach troubles on the run, Hoffman didn't have the follow-up race to his 2014 2nd place finish that

The post Post-Kona Update From Ben Hoffman appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
After a tough day in Kona plagued by stomach troubles on the run, Hoffman didn’t have the follow-up race to his 2014 2nd place finish that he was hoping for this year (27th after leading halfway through the bike). Hoffman has been in Hawaii since the race and will take on the XTERRA World Championship in Maui on Sunday. He qualified for XTERRA Worlds by finishing runner-up at the Mountain Championship in Beaver Creek, Colo., earlier this summer. Hoffman talks about the confidence he was still able to gather from a disappointing day in Kona, and how he’ll spend the remainder of the season, which includes a trip to the Bahamas next week for the exclusive, $500,000 prize purse Island House Tri.

The post Post-Kona Update From Ben Hoffman appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Tyler Butterfield: For Me Top 5 Is A Win http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/10/video/tyler-butterfield-for-me-top-5-is-a-win_124278 Mon, 12 Oct 2015 19:18:09 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=124278

Bermuda's Tyler Butterfield turned in the top finish of his career at Saturday's Ironman World Championship in Kona.

The post Tyler Butterfield: For Me Top 5 Is A Win appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Bermuda’s Tyler Butterfield turned in the top finish of his career at Saturday’s Ironman World Championship in Kona. Butterfield chats about what fifth place means to him, shares his unique training philosophy and explains the role his family plays in his preparation.

More Kona coverage.

The post Tyler Butterfield: For Me Top 5 Is A Win appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Video: Meredith Kessler On Solving The Heat Puzzle In Kona http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/10/video/video-meredith-kessler-on-solving-the-heat-puzzle-in-kona_123979 Sat, 10 Oct 2015 01:22:10 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=123979

Meredith Kessler is one of the strongest Ironman athletes in the sport, but she has yet to turn in a strong performance in Kona.

The post Video: Meredith Kessler On Solving The Heat Puzzle In Kona appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
American Meredith Kessler is one of the strongest Ironman athletes in the sport, but she has yet to turn in a strong performance at the Ironman World Championship. As someone who struggles with racing in the heat, Kessler has been working on solving the heat puzzle so that she can show her full potential on race day.

More Kona coverage.

The post Video: Meredith Kessler On Solving The Heat Puzzle In Kona appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Craig Alexander: Kona Picks And Life After Ironman http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/10/video/craig-alexander-kona-picks-and-life-after-ironman_123966 Fri, 09 Oct 2015 21:21:25 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=123966

Craig Alexander shares his Kona podium picks, talks about being on the island as a spectator and dives into his future racing plans.

The post Craig Alexander: Kona Picks And Life After Ironman appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Three-time Ironman world champion Craig Alexander shares his Kona podium picks, talks about being on the island as a spectator and dives into his future racing plans.

More Ironman World Championship coverage.

The post Craig Alexander: Kona Picks And Life After Ironman appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Video: Gordon Ramsay Set To Compete In Kona For Second Time http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/10/video/video-gordon-ramsay-set-to-compete-in-kona-for-second-time_123909 Fri, 09 Oct 2015 02:38:47 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=123909

Celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay will go after his second attempt at the Ironman World Championship this Saturday in Kailua-Kona.

The post Video: Gordon Ramsay Set To Compete In Kona For Second Time appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay will go after his second attempt at the Ironman World Championship this Saturday in Kailua-Kona. Ramsay competed in Kona in 2013, crossing the line in 14:04:48.

More Ironman World Championship coverage.

The post Video: Gordon Ramsay Set To Compete In Kona For Second Time appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Video: Mirinda Carfrae On Being The Kona Underdog http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/10/video/video-mirinda-carfrae-on-being-the-kona-underdog_123723 Thu, 08 Oct 2015 00:37:43 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=123723

Mirinda Carfrae chats about pre-race pressure, the attention that's been given to Daniela Ryf, and how fast she thinks she can run.

The post Video: Mirinda Carfrae On Being The Kona Underdog appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Three-time Ironman world champion Mirinda Carfrae (AUS) chats about the pressure heading into Saturday’s race, the attention that’s been given to last year’s runner-up Daniela Ryf, and what marathon time she thinks she’s capable of posting.

RELATED – Kona Training Log: Rinny’s Energy Lab Run

More Kona coverage.

The post Video: Mirinda Carfrae On Being The Kona Underdog appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Top Americans Talk Kona http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/10/race-coverage/top-americans-talk-kona_123177 Thu, 01 Oct 2015 20:38:35 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=123177

Andy Potts, Liz Lyles, Tim DeBoom and Ben Hoffman. Photo: John David Becker

The top U.S. finishers in Kona last year sat down with Tim DeBoom for some tough-love talk about bringing the world title back home.

The post Top Americans Talk Kona appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
The top U.S. finishers in Kona last year—Ben Hoffman (2nd), Andy Potts (4th) and Liz Lyles (7th)—sat down with Tim DeBoom, the last American to win in Hawaii, for some tough-love talk about what it will take to bring the world title back home.

Tim DeBoom: So, Ben, how do you think doing three Ironmans—Kona, Florida and Texas—in the span of six months is going to affect your next six months?

Ben Hoffman: Florida wasn’t even really an Ironman because it didn’t have the swim but, yeah, that one was a validation simply to take the stress off. You find a lot of athletes every year where something happens, whether they get sick or crash, they get injured, and suddenly, you find yourself in June or July, and you don’t have your Ironman done, you didn’t punch your ticket. I’m not at all concerned about the way that it’s going to affect my preparation for Hawaii because I have the entire month of June and into July to be more relaxed on my training and recovering so I can get into that big block before Hawaii. Because an Ironman, to me, is not only a physical drain, but the buildup and the actual race itself causes emotional stress. Also, in Texas, I felt like I didn’t really end up getting to race that one like I wanted to, especially on the marathon.

TD: Why don’t any of you go overseas and race the people who are winning Kona? Why don’t you go and race Germany, why not challenge yourself and learn something that way? Why stick to the safety of the States instead of getting yourself out there and getting out of your comfort zone of racing some of these guys who are performing in Kona and winning it? Challenging guys like Sebastian Kienle and Frederik Van Lierde on their turf instead of on American soil. Andy, I don’t think you’ve ever ventured out to Europe to do an Ironman.

Andy Potts: Not to do an Ironman, no, and I don’t know if I will. I mean, maybe.

TD: Why? Why wouldn’t you do that? Last year, you had kind of a breakthrough in Kona, getting fourth by changing your plan a little bit, by not racing as much leading up to Kona. I’m just wondering if putting yourself in a different position, changing some options throughout the season, would help lead you to a different result in Kona?

AP: As an athlete you don’t want to fall into the trap of doing the same thing and expecting a different result. You do want to continue to evolve, and I think my job as a professional athlete is to stay ahead of the curve in terms of my competition, and treat it like a business. I mean, this is something I take very seriously and something I’m passionate about. But I’ve had great seasons where I haven’t performed well in Hawaii. I think going over to Europe—there’s not a cost benefit in that analysis for me, it’s not worth it. A lot of my goals in life are structured around my family, and I like to call my own shots, and I think just because you perform well in Europe once or twice it doesn’t mean that you’re going to perform well in Hawaii. So it’s tough, I certainly don’t have the answers. But I’m willing to look for them. Maybe I would go over, but the benefit would have to be substantial for me to do it. I’ve raced Sebastian a couple of times, Frederik Van Lierde a couple of times, and I think I actually have a winning record against both of them. They just have happened to beat me in Hawaii.

TD: Well that’s the whole point of this conversation—what it takes for the next American to win Hawaii. … Believe me, I understand about family obligations and the want to be with family—that’s why I stopped racing. … I wanted to win Hawaii, and I was willing to throw everything into it and, when I’ve talked to other guys who have won it, that was the focus it took for them as well, making that the ultimate goal and throwing everything else off the table. It was like, ‘Well, win or lose, this is my season.’ … That’s a risk, and everybody’s got a difference risk tolerance, so that’s the question I was asking.

BH: I know you’ve said this a lot of times and I’ve read things you’ve said about Americans and why they aren’t winning in Hawaii, but I would ask you a couple of things. Why is it that you think racing in Europe is the absolute answer for us? And number two, how do you explain someone like Craig Alexander, who has the course record?

TD: I’ve always said Craig’s an anomaly.

BH: Like you said, Andy, there is no one answer for Hawaii. And I mean certainly, you’re seeing a trend, you know faster cyclists all around, but how is [racing in Europe] the one answer for us?

TD: Well it’s not specifically Europe. What I’m seeing in Europe is that these guys who are winning Kona these past couple of years are picking a big European race. If you haven’t done one in Europe you wouldn’t realize that, when you’re there, it’s bigger than Kona. It’s a pressure-packed situation, so getting yourself ready for that is very similar to Kona. It’s almost bigger to do Germany than Kona for them because of the hometown thing, so you’re going against them when they’re almost fitter than they are in Kona, so it’s a good test of everything. And that’s what I’m getting at is racing these guys, getting out of your comfort zone, off your home turf—it’s pushing your boundaries and your limits.

I’ve watched things change, and I think I saw it with Craig where he won Kona after winning 70.3 worlds four weeks before, and now everybody just kind of does a half-Ironman, basically, two to four weeks before an Ironman and thinks that’s kind of become the standard of prep for Kona. Not even just for Kona—for an Ironman. I saw you do it before Texas, Ben, so do you think that played into your performance in Texas? Doing St. George two weeks before an Ironman, that’s—I mean, I think the respect level for doing a 70.3 distance is not quite there for what it does to your body. I would never be able to do an Ironman two weeks after a half, and that was my question, just like, ‘Wow, is everybody that much fitter and better at recovery than I ever was? Or than Mark [Allen] or Dave [Scott, two of the legends of Ironman] ever was?’

I think [coach] Brett Sutton has perpetuated this with his female athletes where he just throttles them, but people don’t realize how many people are shot out the back of his program. One or two might make it through, no man has ever made it through his program successfully, but the women do occasionally. I mean Chrissie Wellington, totally an anomaly, up there with Crowie. For me, four weeks out from an Ironman was always prime training, and beginning of recovery for that Ironman. So what’s the mentality for you guys going into a full Ironman with a half-Ironman two to five weeks out?

Liz Lyles: I think though, for maybe earlier in the season, you don’t really know what’s going to get you a win in Kona. You don’t know if a lot of rest is or racing more. So earlier in the season if you want to do a half two weeks before and then an Ironman you’re like, ‘OK, that didn’t work.’ Now for Kona I won’t do that. But you always have to be trying different ideas, right? You have to, [or] how are you ever going to know if racing three weeks before Kona didn’t work unless you try it earlier in your season when it’s not all the cards on the table?

RELATED: No Rest And No Regrets: Liz Lyles’ Story

TD: Right, but I’m seeing it almost every time by athletes.

LL: Some are.

TD: So like I said, it’s not a judgment. I’m just questioning it because I’m just wondering how often you can keep doing that without it being cumulative to not only your season, but your career. And I mean, Andy, how old are you?

AP: 38.

TD: 38, and I’m having a hard time thinking that there’s going to be a lot of athletes in their 20s and early 30s right now who are going to make it to 38 with the race schedules that everybody has. Ironman I blame for that, with the point system.

AP: Yeah, I also started later.

TD: Well you started doing Ironman much later, you’ve been an endurance athlete your whole life.

AP: Yeah.

TD: I had a 20-year career, but I probably still have raced less than you guys. Just because I was very cautious.

BH: Well, you didn’t have the same [Kona Pro Rankings] qualification system.

TD: I didn’t have the qualification system, but you had to go through the qualifying process and I mean, I still think their points system is off. It needs reworking for athletes, I think. The top 10 in Kona deserve to be invited back, and winners of an Ironman deserve to be invited, but the point system has definitely changed the game, for sure.

BH: But I think what you’re going to see is there’s going to be a block of guys where you don’t have that performance in Kona, and you almost have to—it’s going to be like a swapping each year, you know? A chunk of athletes who come in prepared, not having done it the year before, and people that don’t have a great Kona are going to potentially miss out because they’re getting swapped out by those other people each time, so I don’t know. But you’re right. if you have a good Kona, it sets you up for the next year. Just like it did when you were top 10 and they gave you auto-qual, or whatever it was before. I don’t even know what the system was back in the ’90s and early 2000s for you, what was it?

TD: It was top 10 got invited back.

BH: OK. But if you didn’t do that you had to—it was slots?

TD: It was slots at an Ironman. And there were slots at some 70.3s.

BH: But to answer your question about the 70.3 thing, it is something I’ve done a lot of times. I’ll brave a half before an Ironman, not before Hawaii—probably the closest I would do is five or six weeks. I think that you’re probably right, it’s worth considering the impact it has on you, but I think when you’re really fit, I don’t think it’s tremendously difficult to recover from a 70.3. There is a sharpening aspect to it, and it’s a good reminder of racing, just the simple things. Staying focused for four hours and transitions, things you might forget about a little bit when you’re training, just big blocks of 8 to 10 weeks without any racing in it, so I think there is some advantage to it.

RELATED – Ben Hoffman: “The Biggest Demand Comes From Within”

TD: I used to throw Olympic-distance races in there, purely as trainers, even 5Ks or 10Ks just to get that nervous energy out. I used to question the half-Ironman because I think—for me, that’s a tough distance, and it took a lot out of me.

AP: The fields are definitely getting better, and deeper and faster, right? And it’s the way that the sport, any sport should be progressing. There is a lot of racing, it’s tactical, you can’t just put your head down and go. The women’s race is getting there, although you’re seeing it’s not quite as deep and it’s not as tactical, I think you can still get away with just doing your own race, more on the female side than on the men’s side.

TD: It was like that when I was racing. I agree. 100 percent.

AP: But now there’s just more in the mix, right? I think an American’s going to win eventually—it’s going to happen. I don’t know when, but I guarantee you, the answer to the equation then changes again. The 70.3 world championships are in Europe, so I think that’s going to get a little more attention from the Europeans, which is great for us.

TD: I think if they want it to be a true worlds, they need to put it in June. So you guys can actually train for that and not have Kona in the back of your head for that one.

For me it was just solitary focus on Kona. That was it. Meaning like, every race I did, everything I did—the reason for doing it was Kona. I planned my season around Kona. The races I did, how they were going to affect Kona. Racing two weeks in a row, how was that going to affect Kona? And my off-season was, ‘How is this going to affect Kona?’ And was it healthy to think that way? It worked for a couple of years. But it’s hard. I couldn’t do it with a kid now, it’s just a huge sacrifice. And now I realize why it only works a couple times—because of the amount of sacrifice it took. And the amount of selfishness and being an ass at times, you know? To win over there you need to have a mean streak. … I didn’t have it until I had a taste of it. I got third and I got a taste of it. And then I got another taste of it the next year and it really pissed me off to get second. So the next 364 days before the next one, it was one solitary focus. And that’s what it took. I wouldn’t do something that wasn’t going to benefit me in Kona for that entire year. And you look back at people in the same situation in other sports and everything, and that’s what it took to get to that pinnacle peak level was, ‘All right, I’m putting all my eggs in this single solitary focus. If I fail, it’s on me, I’m failing miserably, but if I win, it was all worth it.’

LL: How do you think the race has changed in terms of the swim and in the first group on the bike, how do you think that would factor in?

TD: That was the same way back for me—it was I had to be out in the lead group in swimming, there were guys, [like] Normann Stadler, who were good enough on the bike that they didn’t have to be in the lead group but, again that’s an anomaly, that’s very rare. But in that sense, the race was similar, and seriously the biggest change now from when I was racing is the qualifying procedure. … I’d show up in Kona, I’d be like, ‘There’s 10 guys who can win today. And I’m one of them. And I’m going to mix it up with them.’ And I don’t think that part of it has changed. I think the biggest change is the qualifying procedure and I think you can still set up your season to be your freshest, your fittest, your fastest in Kona. I think a lot of guys are not showing up in Kona, and a lot of women are not showing up in Kona their fittest, their freshest.

AP: Does that frustrate you?

TD: It does. I look at Michael Raelert … and I’m like what are these guys doing? I shake my head because they just shoot themselves in the foot doing dumb stuff. And I think a lot of it is done out of fear. They throw in something, that one last thing that they need to do, throw it in instead of just taking the risk. It’s hard to watch sometimes. And sometimes maybe it pays off, but it’s more than likely it doesn’t.

RELATED: 20 Things You Probably Never Knew About Andy Potts

AP: Does anything surprise you? Did last year surprise you? Or maybe the past couple years? In terms of a singular performance or the lack of a performance?

TD: I saw you, Ben, right before you left for Kona last year. We crossed paths on a trail. … Quick hi and stuff, and just seeing his stride and his face, I got back home and I told my wife, ‘I saw Ben out running, he’s probably headed to Kona right about now.’ I said, ‘I think he’s going to have a good race.’ Because I’d seen your run progression, what you did in Coeur d’Alene and just that you hadn’t over-raced. I predicted Van Lierde the year he won, because I saw his progression, and I was just like, ‘He’s doing everything right, everything that I would have done as well.’ Luke McKenzie the year before, nobody picked that. So there’s always somebody thrown into the mix, but the winner has been consistently someone who has shown that potential. … The strongest guy usually does win. That’s usually the way it works out. That’s the beauty of Kona—it’s more about strength than speed. There are some years where tactics have really played into it, but look at Kienle last year—it was just full throttle the whole day and that’s what it took. It’s funny, everybody told me, the next American to win, they’re like, ‘Oh, he’s going to make a million bucks,’ and I could say the same thing to you guys. Use that as a carrot. Say, ‘Man, if I win this thing, I can write my ticket to do stuff.’ It’s way bigger than when I won or when Mark won, or Dave won. I mean, corporate America, it’s not ‘I want to do a marathon’ anymore—it’s ‘I want to do an Ironman.’ And that’s a big deal to have an American win it. We need it. The sport needs it.

More Kona coverage from Triathlete.com.

The post Top Americans Talk Kona appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>