Triathlete.com » Jené Shaw http://triathlon.competitor.com Triathlon Training, Gear, Nutrition, Photos, Race Results & Calendars Wed, 10 Feb 2016 23:24:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.3.1 Six Steps To Master The Swim Exit http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/02/training/swim-training-master-the-swim-exit_29054 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/02/training/swim-training-master-the-swim-exit_29054#comments Wed, 10 Feb 2016 20:00:39 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=29054

Photo: Maxisport / Shutterstock.com

Exiting the open water is an often overlooked part of the transition from swim to bike. Sara McLarty thinks about the swim exit in 6 steps.

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Exiting the open water is an often overlooked part of the transition from swim to bike. Many seconds can be gained and lost, so technique and planning are important. Sara McLarty thinks about the swim exit in 6 steps:

Step 1: Swim toward the finish. Know the course and find tall buildings or trees to sight that are in line with the swim exit.

Step 2: Activate your legs. Kick a little extra during the last 200 meters of the swim.

Step 3: Keep swimming! Don’t stop or stand up until you have run aground in the shallow water. When your fingers scrape the bottom, take a few more strokes by pulling right under your torso.

Step 4: Stand up and lift your goggles onto your forehead. This action clears your vision as you start to run out of the water.

Step 5: Unzip your wetsuit on solid ground. Running through sand and rocks is hard enough. Wait until you reach carpeting or pavement to search for that strap!

Step 6: Take off your cap and goggles when you see your bike. Abandonment of equipment can result in a penalty, so don’t risk dropping these small items.

RELATED: 9 Secrets To Proper Open-Water Sighting

More swim training advice.

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One-Hour Workout: Strength Work With Your Dog http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/02/training/one-hour-workout-strength-work-with-your-dog_128113 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/02/training/one-hour-workout-strength-work-with-your-dog_128113#comments Tue, 09 Feb 2016 16:30:40 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=128113

Photo: Shutterstock.com

“In order to conserve time and still get a workout in, I started combining my dog walk with my workout.”

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Every Tuesday we’ll feature a different coach’s workout you can complete in 60 minutes (or less!).

This week’s workout comes from Lori Hoefer of Pacific Cycling and Triathlon in Stamford, Conn. Hoefer says she is most productive in the morning and tries to cram in chores, reading, feeing the dogs and a workout in before she heads into work. “In order to conserve time and still get a workout in I started combining my dog walk with my workout,” Hoefer says. For this full-body workout, load the dogs and 3–5 pound weights in the car and go to your favorite dog-walking trail. “The best terrain will give you a mix of short hills and flat stretches,” she says.

RELATED – Clever Gear Alert: A Hands-Free Dog Leash

Warm-up
5 minutes light jog

Main Set
Stop at a large rock or fallen tree and do alternate leg step-ups, 10 each side
Walk for 2–3 minutes as you do bicep curls
Find another fallen tree or even a large stick and do 20–40 lateral jumps (traversing side to side) over the object
Walk another 2–3 minutes while doing overhead shoulder presses
Find a large tree and use it for standing push-ups (10–20 reps)
Lunge walk for 2–3 minutes, again doing bicep curls
Stop in place for 20 squats, keeping your back in a neutral position, arms crossed with hand weights over your chest, and not letting your knees travel forward of your toes.
Run for 5 minutes at a moderate pace
Stop at a secure large rock or log and do 20 jump-ups (aka box jumps—set the weights down for this)
Walk for 2–3 minutes doing overhead triceps extensions
Stop at a small rock and do 20–30 calf raises

Cool-down
Jog back to the car and give your dog(s) a treat.

RELATED: Find The Right Dog For You

More one-hour workouts

 

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Quick Set Friday: Kickboard Drills http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/02/training/kickboard-drills-swim-workout-for-triathletes_75586 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/02/training/kickboard-drills-swim-workout-for-triathletes_75586#comments Fri, 05 Feb 2016 16:05:33 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=75586

Photo: Shutterstock.com

We feature a workout every Friday so you have new ideas to take to the pool.

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Triathlete contributor and swimming all-star Sara McLarty has a blog with more than 500 creative workouts used in her Masters swim program in Clermont, Fla. We’ll feature a workout every Friday so you have new ideas to take to the pool. On her blog (Mastersswimworkoutsbysaramclarty.blogspot.com), you can pick a Monday set for a long distance focus, a Wednesday set for sprint training, or Friday for creative open water skills.

A:
900 warm-up (3×200 swim/100 kick)
4×300 on 4:30 (100 free/100 IM/100 free)
8×200 pull on 3:00 (descend time 1–4, 5–8)
4×50 kick on 1:10 (25 Tombstone/25 easy)
4×50 drill on :60 (Catch-up With Stick or Kickboard)
4×50 swim on :50 FAST! (start 2 yards off wall)
200 cool-down
*4,500 Total*

RELATED: Are Kicking Sets That Important?

B:
900 warm-up (3×200 swim/100 kick)
3×300 on 6:00 (2×100 free/50 non-free)
6×150 pull on 3:00 (descend time 1–3, 4–6)
4×50 kick on 1:20 (25 Tombstone/25 easy)
4×50 drill on 1:10 (Catch-up With Stick or Kickboard)
4×50 swim on :60 FAST! (start 2 yards off wall)
200 cool-down
*3,500 Total*

RELATED: Refine Your Swim Kick

C:
600 warm-up (2×200 swim/100 kick)
3×300 with 30 sec rest (2×100 free/50 non-free)
4×150 pull with 20 sec rest (descend time 1–4)
8×50 with 10 sec rest (descend stroke count 1–4, 5–8)
100 cool-down
*2,600 Total*

Drills

Catch-up With Stick: As you take a stroke with your right arm, keep your left arm extended forward in the water, holding on to a sideways kickboard or stick. Complete the stroke with your right arm and after it enters the water above your head, tap your left hand. This signals the start of the stroke with your left arm. Repeat on other side.

Tombstone: Hold a kickboard upright in the water and push it forward. The more of the board you hold under the water, the harder this drill is!

RELATED: Why It’s Important To Conquer The Swim Kick

More swim workouts

Follow Triathlete on Twitter @Triathletemag for inspiration, new workout ideas, gear reviews from our editors and more.

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Bike Kit Close-Up: Blur Cycling’s Unique Jerseys http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/02/gear-tech/bike-kit-close-up_128024 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/02/gear-tech/bike-kit-close-up_128024#comments Thu, 04 Feb 2016 17:36:52 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=128024

Photo: John David Becker

With only 75 of each jersey made, Blur Cycling caters to athletes who want a jersey their training partner doesn’t have.

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With only 75 of each jersey made, Blur Cycling caters to athletes who want a jersey their training partner doesn’t have.

The trio of cyclist friends who created Blur Cycling hold themselves to three standards when designing bike kits: Every collection must have a simple theme, each must be offered in men’s and women’s sizes and only 75 of each jersey can be printed.

“We decided that we wanted each jersey in our small-batch collections to look like it is part of a whole,” says one of the founders, Jonathan Gates. “They’re intentional. They’re planned. This way, it keeps us from getting bored and allows us to sort of re-invent our brand with every collection.”
Gates says that they generally hate the idea of wearing the same kit a dozen other people are wearing, so they keep quantities limited to foster exclusivity. “We’ve carried that through our packaging and will lean into that even harder on our next collection by individually numbering each jersey, i.e., ‘2 of 75,’” he says. “We think that’ll be something really special for people who can get their hands on a jersey before the collection sells out.”

First came the design, then came the hard part—finding the right materials to meet their quality standards. “We sampled materials and manufacturing from all over the world,” Gates says.

But in the end, they wound up using the highest quality fabrics they could find, which—of course—came from Italy (Gates says the fabrics for the jersey feel like “unicorn hair”). They created the Mono, Vol 01 jerseys as a summer collection to withstand hot summers with mesh paneling on the back and sides, and used an Italian Cytech chamois, a staple in the cycling industry.

“It also became really important to us that our kits were made ethically,” Gates says. They partnered with a Canadian manufacturer to sew their kits and are proud of the decision. “Yeah, it lowers our margins significantly, but it also allows us to sleep well at night knowing there aren’t some kids in Myanmar sewing our kits while we’re sleeping.”

RELATED: 10 Must-Haves For Winter Triathlon Training

On Him

Check Yo Self jersey, $110, and bibs, $160

On Her

Slat jersey, $110, and bibs, $160
Blurcycling.com

More Bike Kit Close-Ups

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One-Hour Workout: Six-Mile Run Variation http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/02/training/one-hour-workout-six-mile-run-variation_127937 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/02/training/one-hour-workout-six-mile-run-variation_127937#comments Tue, 02 Feb 2016 19:57:45 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=127937

Photo: Shutterstock.com

This week’s workout is a simple way to break up a six-mile run with some added speed.

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Every Tuesday we’ll feature a different coach’s workout you can complete in 60 minutes (or less!).

This week’s workout is a simple way to break up a six-mile run with some added speed. Add in the quick strength workout at the end for a well-rounded hour.

Warm-up
1 mile with 4×30 sec pickups followed by 30 sec easy

Main Set
1/2 mile half marathon pace
1/2 mile easy
1/2 mile half marathon pace
1/2 mile easy

1/4 mile 10K effort
1/4 mile easy
1/4 mile 10K effort
1/4 mile easy

Cool-down
2 miles easy

RELATED – One-Hour Workout: Run And Strength Boot Camp

3x through:
10 pushups
10 V-ups
10 squats
10 sit-ups

More one-hour workouts

 

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One Hour Workout: 2-2-1 Over-Unders Run http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/01/training/one-hour-workout-2-2-1-over-unders-run_127687 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/01/training/one-hour-workout-2-2-1-over-unders-run_127687#comments Tue, 26 Jan 2016 17:36:56 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=127687

Photo: Rihardzz / Shutterstock.com

This session works a range of effort levels, from easy to threshold.

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Every Tuesday we’ll feature a different coach’s workout you can complete in 60 minutes (or less!).

This week’s run workout comes from USAT Level I coach Maria Simone of No Limits Endurance. “This session works a range of effort levels, from easy to threshold,” she says. “This serves a few purposes: It introduces some short threshold work to help athletes keep some top-end work in their schedule, while also teaching the body to recover from those efforts without stopping, which can aid with training the body for improved lactate clearance. The shorter intervals are especially helpful to keep a treadmill session interesting if you need to run indoors.”

RELATED: Do I Have To Take Rest Days?

One Hour Workout: 2-2-1 Over-Unders Run

Before running, do some type of pre-warm-up, which may include dynamic stretching, core work or walking.

Warm-up
Run 15 minutes easy and build to steady.

Main Set
Repeat the following sequence 8x:
– 2 min at steady effort or marathon pace (aerobic; 80–90% of Lactate Threshold HR or 60% of Max HR)
– 2 min hard or 5K effort (threshold; 95–100% of LTHR or 75–80% max HR; or 95% of 5k pace)
– 1 min easy or recovery effort (recovery; +90 sec to 2 min per mile slower than marathon pace)

Cool-down

Run 5 mine easy

It will take time for your HR to register for these shorter sets, so use your rate of perceived exertion for this run. If you train by pace, you can use comparable paces to substitute for HR.

RELATED: The Perfect Running Interval

More one-hour workouts

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Considering Cyclocross? Take Sarah True’s Advice http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/01/training/cyclo-cross-sarah-true_127458 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/01/training/cyclo-cross-sarah-true_127458#comments Tue, 19 Jan 2016 21:30:39 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=127458

Photo: Brad Kaminski

How does Olympian Sarah True have fun (and stay fit) during the off-season? By going off-road!

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How does Olympian Sarah True have fun (and stay fit) during the off-season? By going off-road!

Sarah True has already punched her Olympic ticket to Rio for 2016, and coming off a season that earned her third place in the world for the ITU World Triathlon Series, she has the luxury of training the way she chooses over the off-season. The New Hampshire resident loves going off-road during the winter months and races cyclocross to keep her technical skills sharp. Considering a cyclocross event? Take True’s advice for your first race.

It’s OK to be sort of bad.
You are a triathlete, so don’t expect to go in crushing it in a completely different sport. The good news is the result is kind of beside the point. “I’m a mediocre cyclocross rider, but I love it,” True says. “I’m really good at the run-ups, but I can’t jump barriers. I get off my bike a lot and carry it all the time. I just think, ‘How did you possibly ride over that?!’”

RELATED: Racing Lessons From Top American Sarah True

Prepare to redline the whole time.
“It’s hard because I’m not really fit and it really hurts when you’re not fit,” True says. “You’re redlining for 45 minutes to an hour.”

RELATED: What Cross-Training Activities Are Most Beneficial?

You’ll reap the cycling rewards (and smile while doing it).
True is an advocate of doing things that are different and make you smile. Plus, the benefits cyclocross racing has on your cycling skills make it worth a try. “It’s going to help with your handling skills and develop your threshold, but it’s also just fun,” she says. “It’s easy to get caught up in hitting numbers and we forget to have fun. I think one of the reasons I’m still racing with a huge smile on my face is because I really genuinely have a good time, and part of that is what I do in the off-season. I actively seek out things that put a big ol’ smile on my face and that’s, for me, riding on dirt roads and going in the woods on my ’cross bike and falling off every once in a while, but just laughing at myself because I’m being a bit of a knucklehead.”

RELATED: Crossing Over To Cyclocross

It will re-energize your mindset.
“I think it brings it back to the love of the sport, and anytime you do something out of your comfort zone that pushes you, you get that feeling back,” she says. “It’s a challenge, and a challenge is a good thing. It helps you grow as an athlete.”

RELATED: 4 Off-Season Cycling Rules

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One-Hour Workout: Trainer Climbing Plus Intervals http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/01/training/one-hour-workout-trainer-climbing-plus-intervals_127441 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/01/training/one-hour-workout-trainer-climbing-plus-intervals_127441#comments Tue, 19 Jan 2016 16:05:58 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=127441

Illustration by Oliver Baker. Photos by John David Becker and Scott Draper.

Intervals after a climbing set can make you feel like you are riding through mud, but they make you strong in the long run!

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Every Tuesday we’ll feature a different coach’s workout you can complete in 60 minutes (or less!).

This week’s bike workout comes from Heather Gill, a coach at Energy Lab, a power cycling studio in Atlanta. “This workout is a good mix of strength work and speedwork,” she says. “Intervals after a climbing set can make you feel like you are riding through mud, but they make you strong in the long run!”

RELATED: How To Disguise Your Strength Work

Warm-up
10 min easy

Build intervals
1 min increasing from 80, 90, 100, 110% power (or effort) with 1 minute at 50% power in between each for recovery.

RELATED: Head (Indoors!) For The Hills

Main Set
Repeat the entire set below three times.
4 min at 80% power at the lowest cadence that is safe for you (60-75 RPM) straight into
1 min at 105% power with high cadence followed by 1 min rest (do just the 1 min intervals 4x through)

Cool-down
6 min easy

More one-hour workouts

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Quick Set Friday: Kick Between Intervals http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/01/training/quick-set-friday-kick-between-intervals_74649 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/01/training/quick-set-friday-kick-between-intervals_74649#comments Fri, 15 Jan 2016 16:50:04 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=74649

Photo: Shutterstock.com

A new swim workout to try this weekend.

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Triathlete contributor and swimming all-star Sara McLarty has a blog with more than 500 creative workouts used in her Masters swim program in Clermont, Fla. We’ll feature a workout every Friday so you have new ideas to take to the pool. On her blog (Mastersswimworkoutsbysaramclarty.blogspot.com), you can pick a Monday set for a long distance focus, a Wednesday set for sprint training, or Friday for creative open water skills.

A:
500 choice warm-up
8×50 on :60 (kick hard on wall between intervals)
9×150 pull on 2:05 (descend 1-3, 4-6, 7-9)
8×50 on :60 (vertical kick between intervals)
9×100 pull (3 on 1:25, 3 on 1:20, 3 on 1:15)
8×50 on :50 (IM Switch)
300 cool-down (50 kick/100 swim, repeat)
*4200 Total*

RELATED: How Strong Is Your Swim Kick?

B:
500 choice warm-up
6×50 on 1:10 (kick hard on wall between intervals)
6×150 pull on 2:40 (descend 1-3, 4-6)
6×50 on 1:10 (vertical kick between intervals)
6×100 pull (3 on 1:50, 3 on 1:40)
6×50 on :60 (non-free/free by 25)
300 cool-down (50 kick/100 swim, repeat)
*3200 Total*

RELATED: Refine Your Swim Kick

C:
400 choice warm-up
6×50 w/ fins w/ :10 rest (25 kick/25 swim)
6×150 pull w/ :20 rest (descend 1-3, 4-6)
6×50 w/ fins w/ :10 rest (25 kick/25 swim)
6×50 pull w/ :15 rest (2 FAST!, 1 easy)
200 cool-down
*2400 Total*

More swim workouts from Sara McLarty.

RELATED: Can You Kick It?

Follow Triathlete on Twitter @Triathletemag for inspiration, new workout ideas, gear reviews from our editors and more.

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One-Hour Workout: Simple Negative Split Bike Or Run http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/01/training/one-hour-workout-simple-negative-split-bike-or-run_127333 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/01/training/one-hour-workout-simple-negative-split-bike-or-run_127333#comments Tue, 12 Jan 2016 19:46:40 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=127333

Every Tuesday we’ll feature a different coach’s workout you can complete in 60 minutes (or less!). This week’s run workout comes from

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Every Tuesday we’ll feature a different coach’s workout you can complete in 60 minutes (or less!).

This week’s run workout comes from Bay-Area coach Mike Portman of Portman Coaching. He says this workout, which can be used for running or cycling, is a simple yet great start for early 2016. The focus is on pacing and negative splitting (getting back faster than you started).

RELATED: The Positives Of A Negative Bike Split

One-Hour Workout: Negative Split Bike or Run

Find a course that is easily repeatable and similar terrain the way out and back. Go out at a moderate pace and track your time. Turn around at the 30-minute time mark. Go steady to tempo pace on the way back—not an all-out effort but something that is a slight discomfort to sustain.

If you’re able to take a minute (or more) off on the way back you get to end the workout under an hour. You earned it!

More one-hour workouts

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Quick Set Friday: 300s And Pull Intervals http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/01/training/300s-and-pull-intervals-swim-workout-for-triathletes_74184 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/01/training/300s-and-pull-intervals-swim-workout-for-triathletes_74184#comments Fri, 08 Jan 2016 15:45:17 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=74184

Photo: Shutterstock.com

A new workout from swimming all-star and Triathlete contributor Sara McLarty to take to the pool this weekend.

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Triathlete contributor and swimming all-star Sara McLarty has a blog with more than 500 creative workouts used in her Masters swim program in Clermont, Fla. We’ll feature a workout every Friday so you have new ideas to take to the pool. On her blog (Mastersswimworkoutsbysaramclarty.blogspot.com), you can pick a Monday set for a long distance focus, a Wednesday set for sprint training, or Friday for creative open water skills.

A:
200 swim/200 pull/200 kick/200 swim
6×50 on :60 (descend stroke count 1-6)
4×300 on 5:30 (50 kick/100 swim, repeat)
4 x [50 pull on :60
100 pull on 1:30
150 pull on 2:15]
6×150 on 2:45 (50 free/50 non-free/50 free)
*4400 Total*

RELATED – Ask Coach Sara: How Do I Get My Sinking Hips Up?

B:
200 swim/200 pull/200 kick/200 swim
6×50 on 1:10 (descend stroke count 1-6)
3×300 on 6:45 (50 kick/100 swim, repeat)
3 x [50 pull on :60
100 pull on 2:00
150 pull on 3:00]
4×150 3:30 (50 free/50 non-free/50 free)
*3500 Total*

RELATED – Ask Coach Sara: Warming Up For A Race

C:
200 swim/200 pull/200 kick
6×50 w/ :10 rest (descend stroke count 1-6)
2×300 w/ :20 rest (50 kick/100 swim, repeat)
2 x [50 pull w/ :10 rest
100 pull w/ :10 rest
150 pull w/ :10 rest]
2×150 3:30 (50 free/50 non-free/50 free)
*2400 Total*

RELATED – Coach Debate: How Often Should Swim Tools Be Used?

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Use Music To Boost Your Cadence http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/01/training/use-music-to-boost-your-cadence_127241 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/01/training/use-music-to-boost-your-cadence_127241#comments Thu, 07 Jan 2016 20:25:19 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=127241

Photo: Nils Nilsen

Want to work on quickening your stride? All you need is a new playlist … and a little rhythm.

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Want to work on quickening your stride? All you need is a new playlist … and a little rhythm.

To increase your running efficiency and speed, you should develop a consistent metronomic cadence. The higher your turnover rate (steps taken per minute), the less time you spend in the air—which in turn reduces impact and lowers your risk of injury.

Test your current cadence by counting your right foot strikes for 60 seconds during an easy run. Multiply that by two. If you’re right around 180, you’re at an optimal stride rate. If you fall below that average—like most of us—you can work on your cadence using music as a tool.

Former marathon world-record holder Haile Gebrselassie has famously used music (specifically the song “Scatman” by Scatman John) to lock in his optimal stride rate, and research has shown that carefully selected music can actually enhance endurance by 15 percent.

These songs are all close to that sweet spot of 180 beats per minute. Simply match your feet to the beat to teach your body what an optimal cadence feels like. If you’re just starting out it may feel pretty fast, so aim to focus on your stride only during the chorus and then work you way up to full songs.

RELATED: Increase Your Running Cadence To Prevent Knee Injuries

1. “Wake Me Up Before You Go-Go,” Wham!
2. “The Distance” Cake
3. “Love is a Battlefield,” Pat Benetar
4. “I’m Still Standing,” Elton John
5. “Umbrella,” Rihanna
6. “Dancing with Myself,” Billy Idol
7. “Free Fallin’,” Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers
8. “Give it Away,” Red Hot Chili Peppers
9. “Such Great Heights,” The Postal Service
10. “Footloose,” Kenny Loggins
11. “Son of A Preacher Man,” Dusty Springfield
12. “Everlong,” Foo Fighters
13. “Lose Yourself,” Eminem
14. “Wonderwall,” Oasis
15. “Longest Time,” Billy Joel

RELATED VIDEO: 3 Drills For A Better Run Stride

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Bike Kit Close-Up: Lululemon http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/01/gear-tech/bike-kit-close-up-lululemon_127200 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/01/gear-tech/bike-kit-close-up-lululemon_127200#comments Wed, 06 Jan 2016 18:02:26 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=127200

Photo: John David Becker

The company has now branched out into men’s cycling apparel with the same emphasis on a flattering fit

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Lululemon is known for its form-fitting yoga pants for women, and the company has now branched out into men’s cycling apparel with the same emphasis on a flattering fit. Testers put the Sea to Sky jersey and bib shorts in the same category as high-end brands like Rapha due to its compressive material, “extremely nice, very dense” chamois and overall quality fit. (One minor fit exception was that the bib straps felt a little short compared to other bibs, but this may vary by rider.) The understated, solid color options are a welcome reprieve from flashy, overly branded apparel. One tester noted that even during two hours in and out of the saddle while mountain biking, the leg grippers stayed in place and the large panel of open mesh on the back allowed for breathability. Other features of note: the sleeves have a slightly longer cut, the pockets are large and snug and include a small zippered one for secure storage.

RELATED – Sweat In Style: 8 Fun Run Apparel Finds

Sea to Sky Jersey, $128
Bib Short, $158
Vest, $138
Lululemon.com

More bike kit close-ups

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One-Hour Workout: Swim With Fins http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/01/training/one-hour-workout-swim-with-fins_127192 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/01/training/one-hour-workout-swim-with-fins_127192#comments Tue, 05 Jan 2016 19:44:43 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=127192

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Fins can help you to understand what a good kick should feel like.

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Every Tuesday we’ll feature a different coach’s workout you can complete in 60 minutes (or less!).

This week’s swim workout comes from Heather Gill, a coach at Energy Lab, a power cycling studio in Atlanta. “I had never used fins as a training tool, but I have found recently that they help you to understand what a small, powerful motion a good kick should feel like,” Gill says. “Pairing it in the same workout with some pulling and mid-length sets help you put it all together. I find each freestyle set feels a little smoother when doing this workout.”

RELATED: Kick Sets You Won’t Hate

Warm-up
500 yards, every fourth lap backstroke

Main Set
200 freestyle moderate, 200 pull with fast turnover, 100 with fins
300 freestyle moderate, 200 pull with fast turnover, 100 with fins
400 freestyle moderate, 200 pull with fast turnover, 100 with fins
500 freestyle moderate, 200 pull with fast turnover, 100 with fins

Cool-down
Easy recovery as needed

Total yardage = 3100 plus cool-down

More one-hour workouts.

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9 Winter-Friendly Running Tops http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/12/gear-tech/9-winter-friendly-running-tops_127067 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/12/gear-tech/9-winter-friendly-running-tops_127067#comments Tue, 29 Dec 2015 21:00:41 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=127067

Photo: John David Becker

Cold weather got you down? Keep chasing those endorphins no matter the elements with these brrrr-friendly running tops.

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Cold weather got you down? Keep chasing those endorphins no matter the elements with these brrrr-friendly running tops.

*Left to right*

Kora Shola 230 Crew (W)
$145, Kora.net

Brooks Seattle Shell (M)
$260, Brooksrunning.com

Mizuno Breath Thermo Double Knit Half Zip (M)
$75, Mizunousa.com

ASICS Thermo Windblocker (M)
$125, Asics.com

RELATED: 10 Must-Haves For Winter Triathlon Training

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One-Hour Workout: High Cadence Bike Workout http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/12/training/one-hour-workout-high-cadence-bike-workout_127045 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/12/training/one-hour-workout-high-cadence-bike-workout_127045#comments Tue, 29 Dec 2015 12:37:45 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=127045

Photo: Shutterstock.com

This week's session will get your heart rate up and force you to work hard.

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Every Tuesday we’ll feature a different coach’s workout you can complete in 60 minutes (or less!).

This week’s bike workout comes from coach Stephanie Liles of TriAttic in Tallahassee, Fla. “This is a great workout to get your heart rate up and work hard,” Liles says. “If you do not have a bike computer, you can count one leg to see how many times your knee comes up [one full revolution] in 10 seconds, then multiply by 6.  That is your RPM.”

RELATED: What Is The Ideal Bike Cadence For You?

You can do this workout on a flat road or bike trainer.

Warm-up
15 min easy spin

Main Set
Include 6×3 min at 105+ RPM with 2 min recovery at 90 RPM

Cool-down
Until you reach 60 min

More one-hour workouts

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Andy Potts’ Ironman Recovery Plan http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/12/training/race-recovery/andy-potts-ironman-recovery-plan_127021 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/12/training/race-recovery/andy-potts-ironman-recovery-plan_127021#comments Wed, 23 Dec 2015 15:14:17 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=127021

Photo: John David Becker

How the fourth-place Ironman World Championship finisher recuperates after his toughest 140.6 miles of the year.

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How the fourth-place Ironman World Championship finisher recuperates after his toughest 140.6 miles of the year.

Before the race:

Cut your toenails 2–3 weeks prior
“I lose an average of about 1.625 toenails per Ironman,” Potts says. “Whenever a course undulates, there’s a tendency for your toenails to take a beating. I used to cut my toenails the day or two before, but that ended up making the ends of my toes have no protection, and giving me blisters on my toe bed. You want to allow your toenails time for growth and for protection.”

Anticipate swelling
“You have internal pressure happening because of the force you’re putting out,” he says. “So you get swelling in your hands and your feet, but you also get it in your head. Because of the activity level, you want to have an adjustable helmet or hat. I ran with a loose-fitting doo-rag. And for cycling shoes, I’ve gone up a European half size in Shimano cycling shoes, and have always run with my running shoes slightly bigger.”

RELATED: Rules Of Ironman Recovery

The day after:

Stay on top of hydration, electrolytes, protein

“I start the day off with rehydrating,” Potts says. “And I purposely eat more protein and salt my food heavily for electrolytes. I think those are good core staples.”

Swim with fins
“The best thing you can do is go for a swim with fins on because you force blood flow to your legs and the biggest muscles,” he says. “It’s really advantageous to not only get nutrients to the needy muscles and bones, but also to bring back any byproduct through the heart and allow it to buffer.”

Don’t stress about any post-race blues
“If you’re not too motivated after, remember that it’s a physical and chemical reaction within yourself—it’s not because you don’t care about life anymore or you’re apathetic about the sport,” Potts says. “You release so many endorphins and have so much adrenaline pumping that you need to get it out; there’s a lot of byproduct happening. You find that you’re usually normal two to three days later.”

RELATED: Andy Potts’ Rules Of Recovery

The week after:

Do the things that make you happy
“The things that make me happy in life are the same things that I was fighting for on race day,” Potts says. “When I wanted the race to be over, even though there were six hours left in the day, I said to myself, ‘There’s going to be time to play with the kids in the waves; you have to fight through this first.’ The same reasons I have to try hard and do my best, those are the things you have to do, and you have to follow through.”

Go for a walk
“I feel a little geriatric, but I do walks,” he says. “We’ll do hikes with the kids or I’ll do a moonlight stroll with the Mrs.”

Take a break from running
“Five days is a good window, eight days is a better window,” Potts says. “I did an Ironman at the end of June and I took one whole week off. My body really appreciated it.”

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One-Hour Workout: Do-Anywhere Strength Circuit http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/12/training/one-hour-workout-do-anywhere-strength-circuit_71630 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/12/training/one-hour-workout-do-anywhere-strength-circuit_71630#comments Tue, 22 Dec 2015 12:43:56 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=71630

Photo: Shutterstock.com

This workout is great for triathletes who don't belong to a gym or who might be traveling and not have access to gym equipment.

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Every Tuesday we’ll feature a different coach’s workout you can complete in 60 mins (or less!).

This week’s strength workout comes from coach Maria Simone of No Limits Endurance Coaching.

This workout is great for triathletes who don’t belong to a gym or who might be traveling and not have access to their regular gym equipment,” Simone says.

One-Hour Strength Circuit

Workout notes:

First, complete the warm-up sequence. Then move to the circuit exercises.

For the circuit portions, complete each exercise continuously for 50 seconds, then take no more than 10 seconds to switch to the next exercise. If done continuously, this will be a very challenging workout that will also give you a bit of a cardio burn as well.

After you have done each exercise once, you will have completed one round. Complete a total of three rounds, with a one-minute rest between each round.

Warm-Up

Repeat this light cardio warm-up twice before beginning the main circuit.

1. March in place for 60 seconds

2. Run in place for 60 seconds
• 20 seconds high knees (quickly tucking your knees as close to your chest as possible)
• 20 seconds with legs wide (slightly wider than shoulder distance apart)
• 20 seconds butt kicks (as if you are trying to kick your butt with your heels)

3. Side jacks for 30 seconds
Start standing with your feet shoulder-distance apart. Step quickly to the right and do a partial squat. As you squat, raise your arms above your head. Return to the start position and repeat with the left leg. Repeat for the time duration.

4. Lunge with alternate arm raises for 30 seconds
As you lunge forward with the right leg, raise your left arm. If you cannot keep your balance with your arm raised, then simply do alternate lunges.

The Circuit (50 seconds per exercise)

Single-leg squat
How to: 
Begin in a standing position on the left leg. Slowly lower yourself as far as you can. Push back up to return to the start position. Switch legs halfway.

Box incline pushup
How to: 
These can be done with your knees on the ground if you cannot do them with your legs at full extension. It is more important to have perfect form than it is to have your legs extended. Put your hands on a box and the feet on the ground. Slowly lower the chest until it is even with the hands. Push back up to return to start position.

Basic crunches
How to: 
The title might say basic, but when these are done correctly, they will pump your abs up! Keep your back flat and try to prevent it arching as much as possible.

Backward lunge
How to: 
Begin with feet shoulder-width apart and hands on your waist. Step the left foot backwards until the knee makes contact with the ground. Return to the start position by pushing off your left foot and returning to the start position. Switch legs halfway.

Alternate Superman
How to:
Lie flat on your stomach, with your arms stretched over your head and your palms facing down. Lift your left arm and your right leg, hold briefly. Switch sides. Repeat.

Box dips
How to: 
Begin in a sitting position with the hands facing forward on the box and feet on the ground. Slowly lower your body until the arms are at 90 degrees and then return to start.

Single-leg bridge
How to: 
Lying on the ground with knees bent, take one leg and cross it over the other. Keep shoulders on the ground as you raise your hips up to the ceiling and slowly lower down. Switch legs halfway.

Plank
How to:
Start by lying face down, with your forearms on the ground, palms facing flat on the ground. Come up on to your toes and forearms. Make sure your back stays flat with no arch or pike. Keep your abdominals tight. Hold the whole time.

Squat thrusts (aka “burpees”)
How to: 
Begin with feet shoulder-width apart in a standing position. Descend into a squat position and kick the legs back and bring your hands forward to create a pushup position. Once the legs come into contact with the ground, pull them back under the body and return to the standing position. To increase the difficulty, you can add a hop when you come up to standing position, and/or a pushup when you are in the high plank position.

Bicycle crunches
How to: 
Lie on your back as if you are going to do a basic crunch. Raise your legs so they are at a 90-degree angle, with your shins parallel to the floor. Place your hands lightly behind your head, not pulling on your neck. Extend your left leg straight and bring your right knee into your chest while bringing your left elbow over to your knee. (They likely will not touch, and that’s not necessarily the goal.) Think about twisting to bring your chest to the knee, rather than your arm to avoid pulling on your neck. Alternate sides continuously for the whole segment.

More one-hour workouts.

RELATED – Med Tent: Take Care Of Your Kinetic Chain

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Quick Set Friday: Pop-Ups, Tennessee Tumblers And Sailboats http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/12/training/quick-set-friday-pop-ups-tennessee-tumblers-and-sailboats_68833 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/12/training/quick-set-friday-pop-ups-tennessee-tumblers-and-sailboats_68833#comments Fri, 18 Dec 2015 16:18:36 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=68833

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Today's "Quick Set Friday" workout features a few new drills to try.

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Triathlete contributor and swimming all-star Sara McLarty has a blog with more than 500 creative workouts used in her Masters swim program in Clermont, Fla. We’ll feature a workout every Friday so you have new ideas to take to the pool. On her blog (NTCMastersSwim.blogspot.com), you can pick a Monday set for a long distance focus, a Wednesday set for sprint training, or Friday for creative open water skills.

The A sets are between 4–5000 yards total, with intervals ranging from 1:20–1:30 per 100. The B sets are 3000–3500 total, with intervals of 1:50–2:00 per 100. The C sets are 2000–2500 total and all based on a rest interval.

A:
500 choice
6 minute kick (30 sec easy, 30 sec hard, 3x(10 sec easy, 10 sec hard), repeat)
500 snake swim (every 4th 25 non-free)
300 swim (5 pop-ups every 50)
500 pull (build by 100)
300 IM (kick/drill/swim by 25)
5×100 on 1:45 (25 FAST! kick, 50 FAST swim, 25 easy sailboat drill)
6×50 on :55 (Tennessee Tumblers)
500 swim (as 5×100 IMs)
300 cool down (50 choice/100 swim, repeat)
*4000 Total*

RELATED – Ask Coach Sara: Warming Up For A Race

B:
500 choice
6 minute kick (30 sec easy, 30 sec hard, 3x(10 sec easy, 10 sec hard), repeat)
400 snake swim (every 4th 25 non-free)
300 swim (5 pop-ups every 50)
400 pull (build by 100)
300 free (kick/drill/swim by 25)
4×100 on 2:15 (25 FAST! kick, 50 FAST swim, 25 easy sailboat drill)
4×50 on 1:10 (Tennessee Tumblers)
400 swim (50 free/50 non-free)
300 cool down (50 choice/100 swim, repeat)
*3400 Total*

RELATED – Ask Coach Sara: Making The Most Of 30 Minutes

C:
400 choice
6 minute kick (30 sec easy, 30 sec hard, 3x(10 sec easy, 10 sec hard), repeat)
300 snake swim (every 4th 25 non-free)
200 swim (5 pop-ups every 50)
300 pull (build by 100)
300 free (kick/drill/swim by 25)
3×100 w/ 20 sec rest (25 FAST! kick, 50 FAST swim, 25 easy sailboat drill)
4×50 w/ 20 sec rest (Tennessee Tumblers)
200 swim (50 free/50 non-free)
100 cool down
*2500 Total*

Tennessee Tumblers:
Push off the wall and swim to the flags near the opposite side of the pool. When you swim under the flags, dive underwater and kick into the wall. Stay under the water as you perform a flip turn or open-turn. Push off and streamline kick until you are past the flags. Pop up and continue swimming back to the wall you started at. This is a very challenging breath-control set and helps swimmers get comfortable with being underwater and holding their breath.

Pop-Ups:
Face the wall and place both hands on the top of the edge of the pool. Push up and out of the water until your arms are fully extended and then drop back down into the water. This will be harder or easier depending on how high the edge of the pool is in relation to the surface of the water.

Sailboat Drill:
Hold a kick board between your thighs. Make sure half of the board is sticking below your body when you swim freestyle. Use your core muscles to control your hip rotation (while the board tries to prevent rotation).

More “Quick Set Friday” workouts.

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One-Hour Workout: Bike Trainer Core Combo http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/12/training/one-hour-workout-bike-trainer-core-combo_126814 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/12/training/one-hour-workout-bike-trainer-core-combo_126814#comments Tue, 15 Dec 2015 19:22:53 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=126814

Photo: Shutterstock.com

This week’s workout keeps the busy holiday season in mind by combining core and cycling into a quick 60-minute session.

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Every Tuesday we’ll feature a different coach’s workout you can complete in 60 minutes (or less!).

This week’s workout keeps the busy holiday season in mind by combining core and cycling into a quick hour session. Set up your bike and trainer next to an area with a mat on the ground, or if you’re using a spin bike at the gym, make sure there’s enough space for you to quickly jump off and do core exercises.

RELATED – One-Hour Workout: Build Bike Base Plus Strength Session

Bike Trainer Core Combo

Warm-up
10 min easy on the trainer, include 4×30 one-legged drills

Trainer Round One
3 min easy spin
1 min standing climb (increase resistance) at 65+ RPM
2 min easy spin recovery
2 min hard effort
2 min easy spin recovery
(10 minutes total)

Core Round One
100 abs total as:
20 crunches
20 hip bridges
20 bicycle crunches
10 pushups
20 leg lifts
10 squats

Trainer Round Two
3 min easy spin
4 min alternating standing climb for 30 sec, seated climb in a hard gear at 65+ RPM
3 min easy spin recovery
2 min hard effort
3 min easy spin recovery
(15 minutes total)

Core Round Two
100 abs total as:
20 crunches
20 hip bridges
20 bicycle crunches
10 pushups
20 leg lifts
10 squats

Trainer Round Three
3 min easy spin
3×2 min hard effort with 2 min easy spin after each
(15 minutes total)

Core Round Three
100 abs total as:
20 crunches
20 hip bridges
20 bicycle crunches
10 pushups
20 leg lifts
10 squats

More one-hour workouts

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