Triathlete.com » Liz Hichens http://triathlon.competitor.com Triathlon Training, Gear, Nutrition, Photos, Race Results & Calendars Mon, 02 Mar 2015 21:57:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0.1 Coca-Cola To Sponsor “Team Bravo” Triathlon Team http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/02/news/coca-cola-triathlon-team_112528 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/02/news/coca-cola-triathlon-team_112528#comments Mon, 23 Feb 2015 18:43:26 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=112528

Tim Don's race kit.

The team will feature three well-known international professionals and four up-and-coming Brazilian pros.

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Tim Don's race kit.

The Bravo Team, which will be sponsored by Coca-Cola, will officially launch next week in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and will feature three well-known international professionals and four up-and-coming Brazilian pros.

In a mix that Franko Vatterott, who is the manager of several of the pros, calls “Boulder meets Brazil,” the team will be made up of Rachel Joyce (GBR), Tim Don (GBR) and Paul Matthews (AUS)—all of whom train in Boulder, Colo.—and Brazilians Diogo Sclebin, Guilherme Manocchio, Fabio Carvalho and Thiago Vinhal. Three-time Ironman world champion Craig Alexander (AUS) will be a part of the group in a coaching-type role, but will not be racing in the team kit.

RELATED – Dispatch: Rachel Joyce’s Coaching Change

The team came together through a series of relationships and the realization that a partnership between one of the world’s most iconic brands and the selected athletes could benefit Coca-Cola, the professionals and, finally, the sport of triathlon and its exposure in Brazil, which will host the Olympics next year.

“Over the years, Crowie and I have met a lot of passionate triathletes from Brazil,” says Vatterott, who also manages Alexander. “The market has exploded there with quality races from triathlon’s largest race organizers. Teams are good for triathlon, as new platforms for sponsors play such a key role in the sport’s economy. A friend of ours in Sao Paulo wanted to support the professional side of the sport by mixing up some of the top Brazilians pros with a few international stars and now a few months later Team Bravo is ready for take-off. We have the support of Coca-Cola, one of the most iconic global brands on earth, and although we are a smaller team in comparison to some others on the long-distance scene, we have a strong group of athletes that together will likely punch above their weight.”

RELATED: Tim Don Talks About Transition To Long Course

Speculation around the team has been high in Brazil, after a few of the Brazilian athletes raced at Ironman Fortaleza wearing the team kits. The kits of Rachel Joyce and Tim Don—who are both sponsored by Endura Sport—were also publicized a month ago, revealing an affiliation with Coca-Cola of some kind. Unlike some other triathlon teams, the athletes will each continue to carry their own individual sponsors outside of Coca-Cola and will follow their own training and racing plans. The “team” concept is largely aimed at getting some attention on the athletes, Coca-Cola and the sport of triathlon, specifically in Brazil.

After the official team launch this week in Rio, all of the members—with the exception of Matthews who plans to compete at Challenge Dubai—plus Alexander will compete in Triathlon International Santos Olympic-distance race this Sunday, March 1.

Check back to Triathlete.com for more on the official team launch.

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Photos: 2015 Challenge Wanaka http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/02/photos/photos-2015-challenge-wanaka_112549 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/02/photos/photos-2015-challenge-wanaka_112549#comments Mon, 23 Feb 2015 16:42:51 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=112549

New Zealanders came out on top at Challenge Wanaka.

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New Zealanders Dylan McNeice and Gina Crawford today extended their phenomenal record at Challenge Wanaka by scoring their third and sixth victories, respectively, at what is regarded as the world’s most scenic long-distance triathlon. Read the race recap.

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Alexander, Blatchford Victorious At 70.3 Geelong http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/02/news/alexander-blatchford-victorious-70-3-geelong_112130 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/02/news/alexander-blatchford-victorious-70-3-geelong_112130#comments Sun, 08 Feb 2015 16:44:31 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=112130

Alexander celebrates another win in Geelong. Photo: Delly Carr

Australians Craig Alexander and Liz Blatchford outran the competition at today’s Ironman 70.3 Geelong.

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Alexander celebrates another win in Geelong. Photo: Delly Carr

Australians Craig Alexander and Liz Blatchford outran the competition at today’s Ironman 70.3 Geelong. Every second mattered on Sunday, with both victories coming with less than a minute margin over the runner-up spots.

Men’s Race
Three-time Ironman world champ Alexander grabbed his fourth victory in a row in Geelong thanks to a 21:55 swim, a 2:09:14 bike and a 1:12:25 run. He crossed the finish line at 3:46:26, just ahead of fellow Australian Sam Appleton who claimed second at 3:46:43. New Zealand’s Mark Bowstead edged out Canada’s Jeffrey Symonds for the third spot on the podium.

“It is nice to come back and win,” Alexander told Ironman.com. “I’ve got a great record here. Hats off to Sammy what he did today was world class, he pushed me all the way.”

Women’s Race
Blatchford put together a 23:45 swim, a 2:28:05 bike and a 1:24:25 half-marathon to earn the win at 4:19:34. Keat was in the mix with Blatchford all day, but ultimately had to settle for second in 4:20:03. Sarah Crowley (AUS) made it an all-Aussie podium for the women, crossing shortly after Keat at 4:20:52.

“It was slightly unexpected, because I had a limited preparation, but I ended up feeling pretty good out there,” Blatchford said in a press release about the win.

Ironman 70.3 Geelong
Geelong, Victoria, Australia – Feb. 8, 2015
1.2-mile swim, 56-mile bike, 13.1-mile run

Men
1. Craig Alexander (AUS) 3:46:26
2. Sam Appleton (AUS) 3:46:43
3. Mark Bowstead (NZL) 3:51:14
4. Jeffrey Symonds (CAN) 3:52:21
5. Marko Albert (EST) 3:54:48

Women
1. Liz Blatchford (AUS) 4:19:34
2. Rebekah Keat (AUS) 4:20:03
3. Sarah Crowley (AUS)) 4:20:52
4. Gina Crawford (NZL) 4:22:12
5. Amanda Wilson (AUS) 4:24:27

Complete results.

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Should I Stop Eating After 6 P.M. As Part Of My Diet Plan? http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/02/nutrition/should-i-stop-eating-after-6-p-m-as-part-of-my-diet-plan_72689 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/02/nutrition/should-i-stop-eating-after-6-p-m-as-part-of-my-diet-plan_72689#comments Fri, 06 Feb 2015 13:31:11 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=72689

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Trying to drop a few pounds before the season starts? Lauren Antonucci advises against cutting your fuel off after a certain time of day.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

Q: I am still trying to drop a few pounds before the 2015 tri season officially starts. Should I be following the “no eating after a certain time” rule to help me reach my weight-loss goals more easily?

A: I get this question a lot. In a word, no! Well-meaning, late-training athletes complain of poor recovery, fatigue and lack of motivation for morning workouts. When we dig into their food log, the reason is clear: poor fueling after evening training sessions due to either “fear of eating late” or simply lack of preparation combined with exhaustion.

RELATED: The Benefits Of Eating A Big Breakfast

Eating a post-workout recovery snack and eating a proper dinner are paramount to both productive training and reaching your body weight goals. Here’s what I recommend:

1. Ensure you are fueling adequately all day, not skimping on calories earlier in the day and thus overeating late at night, which can lead to weight gain (or prevent weight loss).

2. Fuel up before all evening workouts with a good, balanced snack, such as half a sandwich, a cup of soup, or yogurt and fruit.

3. Plan your dinners in advance to avoid poor last-minute choices or “grazing” on whatever happens to be in the kitchen when you arrive home late and hungry.

4. Include complex carbs, lean protein, veggies and good fats in your dinner meal, no matter what time the clock says. Good examples include lentils, salmon, kale and avocado or quinoa and beans, lean meat and sautéed veggies.

5. If you are trying to drop a few unwanted pounds, find other (smart!) places to cut calories, such as that third handful of pretzels at lunch, candy from the office candy jar or that extra beer on Friday night.

RELATED – Racing Weight: Keep It Simple

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ITU WTS Abu Dhabi To Feature Stellar Start List http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/02/news/itu-wts-abu-dhabi-feature-stellar-start-list_112072 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/02/news/itu-wts-abu-dhabi-feature-stellar-start-list_112072#comments Wed, 04 Feb 2015 21:13:09 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=112072

Jorgensen will look to defend her 2014 world title and cement a spot on the U.S. Olympic team by the end of the year. Photo: Delly Carr/Triathlon.org

All reigning Olympic and world champions will compete in Abu Dhabi.

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Jorgensen will look to defend her 2014 world title and cement a spot on the U.S. Olympic team by the end of the year. Photo: Delly Carr/Triathlon.org

The International Triathlon Union (ITU) has revealed the elite start list for next month’s ITU World Triathlon Series Abu Dhabi and it features some stellar names, including all reigning Olympic and world champions. It kicks off an important WTS season that will ultimately decide most of the spots on Olympic teams for next year.

On the men’s side, top names include 2014 ITU world champion and 2012 Olympic silver medalist Javier Gomez (ESP), 2012 Olympic champion Alistair Brownlee (GBR) and 2012 Olympic bronze medalist Jonathan Brownlee (GBR). In addition to Gomez and the Brownlee brothers, the remaining seven men in the top-10 2014 ITU World Triathlon Series rankings will also be competing. Those names include Mario Mola (ESP), Joao Pereira (POR), Vincent Luis (FRA), Dmitry Polyanskiy (RUS), Richard Murray (RSA), Ryan Bailie (AUS) and Aaron Royle (AUS). The American contingent for the men will include Joe Maloy and Jarrod Shoemaker.

RELATED PHOTOS – 2014 Male Triathlete Of The Year: Javier Gomez

For the women, American Gwen Jorgensen returns to the WTS after a dominant 2014 season in which she won her first world title. For the first time since her gold medal performance, 2012 Olympic champion Nicola Spirig will look to play a big part in the WTS and will make the start in Abu Dhabi. Other big names on the women’s start list include American Sarah True (née Groff), Andrew Hewitt (NZL), Jodie Stimpson (GBR), Helen Jenkins (GBR), Kirsten Sweetland (CAN) and Emma Moffatt (AUS). In addition to Jorgensen and True, other American women starting the race are Chelsea Burns, Kaitlin Donner, Lindsey Jerdonek and Katie Zaferes (née Hursey).

RELATED PHOTOS – 2014 Female Triathlete Of The Year: Gwen Jorgensen

The race is set for March 6-7. Learn more at Abudhabi.triathlon.org.

Men
Fernando Alarza ESP
Miguel Arraiolos POR
Ryan Bailie AUS
Adam Bowden GBR
Alistair Brownlee GBR
Jonathan Brownlee GBR
Gregor Buchholz GER
Reinaldo Colucci BRA
Dorian Coninx FRA
Ron Darmon ISR
Simon De Cuyper BEL
Alessandro Fabian ITA
Luca Facchinetti ITA
Gabor Faldum HUN
Francesc Godoy ESP
Javier Gomez Noya ESP
Crisanto Grajales MEX
Aaron Harris GBR
David Hauss FRA
Vicente Hernandez ESP
Lukas Hollaus AUT
Ivan Ivanov UKR
Travis Johnston RSA
Kyle Jones CAN
Steffen Justus GER
Bryan Keane IRL
Alois Knabl AUT
Pierre Le Corre FRA
Aurélien Lescure ITU
Vincent Luis FRA
Joe Maloy USA
David Mcnamee GBR
Valentin Meshcheryakov KAZ
Mario Mola ESP
Conor Murphy IRL
Richard Murray RSA
Joao Pereira POR
Rostyslav Pevtsov AZE
Dmitry Polyanskiy RUS
Igor Polyanskiy RUS
Anthony Pujades FRA
Aurelien Raphael FRA
Sven Riederer SUI
Gaspar Riveros CHI
Aaron Royle AUS
Andrea Salvisberg SUI
Danylo Sapunov UKR
Henri Schoeman RSA
Diogo Sclebin BRA
Brendan Sexton AUS
Jarrod Shoemaker USA
Joao Silva POR
Vladimir Turbayevskiy RUS
Ivan Tutukin RUS
Davide Uccellari ITA
Marten Van Riel BEL
Richard Varga SVK
Dan Wilson AUS
Jason Wilson BAR
Andrew Yorke CAN

Women
Anastasia Abrosimova RUS
Luisa Baptista BRA
Charlotte Bonin ITA
Sarah-Anne Brault CAN
Chelsea Burns USA
Maaike Caelers NED
Emmie Charayron FRA
Maria Czesnik POL
Elena Danilova RUS
Kaitlin Donner USA
Paula Findlay CAN
Vendula Frintova CZE
Lucy Hall GBR
Anne Haug GER
Andrea Hewitt NZL
Vicky Holland GBR
Sofie Hooghe BEL
Juri Ide JPN
Anneke Jenkins NZL
Helen Jenkins GBR
Lindsey Jerdonek USA
Agnieszka Jerzyk POL
Gwen Jorgensen USA
Yurie Kato JPN
Rachel Klamer NED
Anja Knapp GER
Ditte Kristensen DEN
Aoi Kuramoto JPN
Annamaria Mazzetti ITA
Charlotte McShane AUS
Emma Moffatt AUS
Ainhoa Murua ESP
Pamella Oliveira BRA
Ellen Pennock CAN
Gaia Peron ITU
Lisa Perterer AUT
Hanna Philippin GER
Mari Rabie RSA
Alexandra Razarenova RUS
Aileen Reid IRL
Claudia Rivas MEX
Barbara Riveros CHI
Rebecca Robisch GER
Carolina Routier ESP
Sophia Saller GER
Gillian Sanders RSA
Yuka Sato JPN
Mariya Shorets RUS
Mateja Simic SLO
Nicola Spirig SUI
Jodie Stimpson GBR
Kirsten Sweetland CAN
Yuko Takahashi JPN
Sarah True USA
Ai Ueda JPN
Katrien Verstuyft BEL
Yuliya Yelistratova UKR
Katie Zaferes USA

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Treatment And Prevention Of Achilles Injuries http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/training/med-tent-the-basics-of-achilles-injuries_71666 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/training/med-tent-the-basics-of-achilles-injuries_71666#comments Tue, 27 Jan 2015 19:41:23 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=71666

Split jump.

Fix and prevent pain in your Achilles tendon with these stretches and exercises.

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Split jump.

Fix and prevent pain in your Achilles tendon with these stretches and exercises.

The symptoms

Pain in the back of the heel, the tendon just above it, or possibly up to where the calf muscles form a “V” on the back of the leg. The pain can be mild to debilitating.

What’s going in there?

The Achilles is a thick, ropelike tendon about 4 inches long connecting muscles in the lower leg to their insertion points at the heel bone.

The most common injury location is the muscle-tendon junction, where the muscles converge into the tendon. These injuries tend to heal spontaneously, but not as quickly as an injury higher up the leg, in the muscular area, because the blood flow isn’t as generous.

The most serious Achilles injury is to the tendon itself. Inflammation of the tendon, called tendinitis, and chronic inflammation with fluid buildup, called tendinosis, are the most common of this type.

RELATED VIDEO: Prevent Achilles Tendon Strains

Prevent it

The best way to prevent Achilles tendinitis in the first place is by building limber lower legs. An underlying lack of flexibility, especially in your calf muscles, can be a primary cause of Achilles injuries. These exercises target your lower leg and can be added to any workout.

Split jump (with or without dumbbells)
Stand in a staggered stance, your right foot in front of your left. Lower your body as far as you can. Quickly switch directions and jump with enough force to propel both feet off the floor. While in the air, scissor-kick your legs so you land with the opposite leg forward. Repeat, alternating back and forth
with each repetition.

Farmer’s walk on toes
Grab a pair of heavy dumbbells and hold them at your sides at arm’s length. Raise your heels and walk forward (or in a circle) for 60 seconds. Be sure to stand as tall as you can and stick your chest out.

Fix it

Employ dynamic rest. With Achilles injuries, in general, swimming is fine and biking can work, but only if it’s pain-free. Running is a huge no-no and will make the injury worse.

Ice it. Applying ice to the area for 15 minutes 4–6 times a day can help reduce inflammation and swelling.

Stretch it. I don’t advocate stretching if it brings pain. Once you can do so without pain, do the classic runner’s stretch with your hands against a wall.

Strengthen it. A tendon like the Achilles starts to hurt because of the load on it. If you want to reduce the loading force, build up the muscles affecting that load so they can take the brunt of it. Start with eccentric calf raises: Stand with your heels hanging off a step, take 10 seconds to lower them, then raise them back up at a normal rate. Also add in plenty of plyometric lower-body work like squats, multidirectional lunges, squat thrusts, and so on.

New York City sports medicine specialist  Jordan D. Metzl, M.D. is a 29-time marathon runner and 10-time Ironman finisher. His new book, The Athlete’s Book of Home Remedies, has more than 1,000 tips to fix all types of injuries and medical conditions.

RELATED – Med Tent: What Should I Do About An Aching Achilles Tendon?

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How To Prepare For Your Bike Fit http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/gear-tech/prepare-for-your-bike-fit_73387 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/gear-tech/prepare-for-your-bike-fit_73387#comments Tue, 27 Jan 2015 19:34:52 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=73387 Help your bike fitter help you with these three steps to ensure you get the right fit.

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Help your bike fitter help you with these three steps to ensure you get the right fit.

Companies are constantly devising new fit methodologies and tools dedicated to your comfort and performance on a bike. But when you sign up for a fit, how do you know what you’re getting? Here are three steps to ensure you find the best fit.

Step 1: Evaluate your needs

Your pre-fit process starts by paying attention to how you feel on your bike. Do your feet go numb? Is the saddle causing you issues? Take notes after rides and bring them to your fit.

RELATED: Bike Fit Fixes

Step 2: Do the research

Certifications: Familiarize yourself with the various bike fit certifications. Specialized BodyGeometry Fit, F.I.S.T. Fit, Retül Fit and Serotta Fit are some of the most prominent. Use each database of certified fitters to find someone in your area, or an area you are willing to travel to (often an overlooked option). The certifications will ensure a level of quality control from your fitter, but the person is ultimately most important.

Fit technology: Generally, better fitters invest in better technology to enhance their fit skills. A basic understanding of the various fit technology options allows you to make an educated choice about which is right for you and draw greater benefit from the process.

Triathlon knowledge: Even though all fit curricula teach triathlon fit, make sure your potential fitter understands triathlon bikes and triathletes.

Fitter reputation: Use local or regional tri groups and their forums to get feedback on fitters they like and why.

RELATED: Bike Geometry Explained

Step 3: Ask some questions

To ensure the fitter is qualified and correct for you, ask these questions before booking your appointment:

•  Does the fitter use techniques to address any specific injury or medical concerns?

•  Is the fitter familiar with your bike model? Do they have the tools/parts necessary to make any modifications?

•  How long have they been fitting triathletes? Although the value of years spent fitting can’t be replaced, experience in the sport is also important.

Now you are ready to book your appointment. During the fit appointment, make sure you communicate honestly what you are feeling and experiencing when changes are made. After the fit, listen to your body. If your body is not adapting well to a change after a few rides, book a follow-up appointment to address any issues. The fitter’s job is to pinpoint your optimum setup, so don’t be shy about achieving that shared objective.

No two fits are equal, nor are two fitters exactly the same. Even though you can sign up for the same service at a store or the same branded fit style, the position you leave with ultimately comes down to the fitter and the feedback you give them. With a little research and time spent listening to your body, you should walk away from your next fit more empowered to tackle your goals.

RELATED: Get Low

Ryan Ignatz is the fit manager at Boulder, Colo.’s Colorado Multisport.

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Jodie Swallow Earns Fifth-Straight 70.3 South Africa Win http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/news/jodie-swallow-earns-fifth-straight-70-3-south-africa-win_111674 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/news/jodie-swallow-earns-fifth-straight-70-3-south-africa-win_111674#comments Sun, 25 Jan 2015 17:47:19 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=111674

Jodie Swallow dominated the swim, bike and run in Buffalo City.

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Great Britain’s Jodie Swallow had a stellar 2014 season, including a second-place finish at the Ironman 70.3 World Championship and a fourth-place finish at the Ironman World Championship, and looks to be building on that in 2015. She kicked off her year in the same fashion she has the last four years, with a victory at Ironman 70.3 South Africa in Buffalo City. South Africa’s Matt Trautman grabbed the win on the men’s side.

Men’s Race
It was a battle between Trautman and fellow South African Stuart Marais for much of the day. The two had nearly identical swim and bike splits, but it was Trautman’s 1:16:49 half-marathon that helped him earn the victory in 4:04:35. Marais also had a strong run at 1:18:19 but had to settle for second, finishing second in 4:06:04. Belgian Bart Aernouts rounded out the podium, crossing the line at 4:11:37.

Women’s Race
Swallow dominated the women’s race from the start, turning in the fastest swim, bike and run splits of the pro women. Her day consisted of a 24:41 swim, a 2:33:39 bike and a 1:28:08 half-marathon, giving her the victory in 4:30:54. Susie Cheetham (GBR) and Parys Edwards (GBR) made it an all-British podium, finishing at 4:41:49 and 4:47:45, respectively.

Ironman 70.3 South Africa
Buffalo City, East London, South Africa – Jan. 25, 2015
1.2-mile swim, 56-mile bike, 13.1-mile run

Men
1. Matt Trautman (RSA) 4:04:34
2. Stuart Marais (RSA) 4:06:03
3. Bart Aernouts (BEL) 4:11:36
4. Cyril Viennot (FRA) 4:14:28
5. Johannes Moldan (GER) 4:15:57

Women
1. Jodie Swallow (GBR) 4:30:53
2. Susie Cheetham (GBR) 4:41:
3. Parys Edwards (GBR) 4:47:44
4. Emma Bilham (SUI) 4:55:30
5. Jeani Seymour (RSA) 5:02:02

Complete results.

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Come Swim, Bike And Run In San Diego http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/news/come-swim-bike-run-san-diego_112760 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/news/come-swim-bike-run-san-diego_112760#comments Sun, 25 Jan 2015 12:58:39 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=112760

Escape the cold! Come train with us (and the pros!) in San Diego March 20-25. Use the code "HAPPYCAMPER" by March 1 to get $200 off.

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Jodie Swallow Going After 5th Straight 70.3 South Africa Win http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/news/jodie-swallow-going-5th-straight-70-3-south-africa-win_111655 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/news/jodie-swallow-going-5th-straight-70-3-south-africa-win_111655#comments Fri, 23 Jan 2015 18:09:18 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=111655

Swallow has been unstoppable in Buffalo City. (Pictured here at the Ironman World Championship.) Photo: Aaron Hersh

Swallow has been unstoppable in Buffalo City.

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Swallow has been unstoppable in Buffalo City. (Pictured here at the Ironman World Championship.) Photo: Aaron Hersh

Great Britain’s Jodie Swallow, the 2010 Ironman 70.3 world champion, will compete in Buffalo City, East London on Sunday with the goal of claiming her fifth-straight victory at Ironman 70.3 South Africa.  Other big names making the start include Bart Aernouts (BEL), Kyle Buckingham (RSA), Fraser Cartmell (RSA), Lucie Reed (CZE), Sarah Piampiano (USA) and Jeanni Seymour (RSA). See the complete pro start list below.

RELATED: The Fast-Flying Jodie Swallow

Men
1. Bart Aernouts (BEL)
2. Kyle Buckingham (RSA)
3. Fraser Cartmell (GBR)
4. James Cunnama (RSA)
5. Michael Davidson (RSA)
6. Gerhard De Bruin (RSA)
7. Karol Dzalaj (SVK)
8. Stuart Marais (RSA)
9. Johannes Moldan (GER)
10. Jeremy Morel (FRA)
11. Rudolf Naude (RSA)
12. Swen Sundberg (CIV)
13. Matt Trautman (RSA)
14. Cyril Viennot (FRA)
15. Hannes Cool (BEL)

Women
16. Emma Bilham (SUI)
17. Susie Cheetham (GBR)
18. Parys Edwards (GBR)
19. Amy Forshaw (GBR)
20. Sarah Piampiano (USA)
21. Lucie Reed (CZE)
22. Riana Robertson (RSA)
23. Linda Scattolin Italy
24. Jeanni Seymour (RSA)
25. Andrea Steyn (RSA)
26. Jodie Swallow (GBR)
27. Lynette Van Der Merwe (RSA)

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5 Nutritious Soup Recipes http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/nutrition/eat-right-five-nutritious-soup-recipes_68881 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/nutrition/eat-right-five-nutritious-soup-recipes_68881#comments Wed, 21 Jan 2015 14:14:07 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=68881

Photo: Erin Cahoone

Few things are more satisfying than a hot, nourishing bowl of soup.

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Photo: Erin Cahoone


Few things are more satisfying than a hot, nourishing bowl of soup. These five nutritious soup recipes—all vegan and gluten-free—will warm up your winter.

“Creamy” Broccoli Soup

Ingredients
1 T olive oil
½ medium onion, diced
4 cups broccoli florets (can substitute asparagus)
4 garlic cloves
2 T water
2 cups spinach leaves
3/4 cup cashews, soaked in water for 1 hour
1 tsp red or brown miso paste (optional)
2 cups water
¼ cup nutritional yeast
1 T lemon juice or vinegar
1 tsp each sea salt and pepper

Directions
In a lidded pot, cook onions, garlic and broccoli with oil and 2 T water until broccoli is bright green, about 6–8 minutes. Add spinach to the pot and cook for 2 additional minutes. Transfer to blender and blend with remaining ingredients. Adjust consistency with water if necessary. Adjust salt and pepper to taste. Garnish with fresh broccoli florets. For a non-vegan version, bacon and cheddar cheese make great additions. Makes 4–6 servings.

RELATED – Recipe Of The Week: Kale, Chicken And Yam Soup

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Javier Gomez Commits To Race Challenge Dubai http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/news/javier-gomez-commits-race-challenge-dubai_111473 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/news/javier-gomez-commits-race-challenge-dubai_111473#comments Mon, 19 Jan 2015 22:44:07 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=111473

Gomez is coming off of a successful 2014. Photo: John David Becker

Javier Gomez (ESP) has signed on to compete at Feb. 27's half-iron distance Challenge Dubai.

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Gomez is coming off of a successful 2014. Photo: John David Becker

Challenge Dubai organizers announced today that reigning ITU and 70.3 world champion Javier Gomez (ESP) has signed on to compete at Feb. 27’s half-iron distance Challenge Dubai.

“I am excited to start the 2015 season, Challenge Dubai is going to be my first race of the year,” Gomez said in the press release. “I’m happy to see how triathlon is growing in the Middle East countries, I’m sure it is something very good for the people, especially for the kids, and it is definitely very positive for our sport.”

“I like half distances races and I really look forward to racing against the best triathletes in this distance,” he continued. “I expect Challenge Dubai is going to be a very tough and fast race because of the highest pro field level.”

The Challenge Family recently revealed that the race would offer a $300,000 prize purse, with $65,000 going to both the male and female winners.

Gomez will face a strong field that so far includes big names like Jan Frodeno (GER), Michael Raelert (GER), Luke McKenzie (AUS), Tim Reed (AUS), Brad Kahlefeldt (AUS), Pete Jacobs (AUS) and Terenzo Bozzone (NZL).

Though he hasn’t stated when he’ll kick off his ITU season, it’s likely that Gomez will stay in the region and compete at the 2015 World Triathlon Series opener in Abu Dhabi the following weekend.

Following Challenge Dubai, the Triple Crown Series heads to Challenge Oman (date TBD) and concludes at Challenge Bahrain (Dec. 5). Learn more about Challenge Dubai at Challenge-dubai.com.

RELATED PHOTOS – 2014 Male Triathlete Of The Year: Javier Gomez

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Don’t Play The Nutritional Numbers Game http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/nutrition/dont-play-the-nutritional-numbers-game_71817 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/nutrition/dont-play-the-nutritional-numbers-game_71817#comments Mon, 19 Jan 2015 13:46:39 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=71817

The more vitamins and minerals you eat, the less you will have to understand about nutrition. Runners are driven by numbers. In racing, a

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The more vitamins and minerals you eat, the less you will have to understand about nutrition.

Runners are driven by numbers. In racing, a second or two can make the difference between placing in your age group or walking home empty handed. In training, calculating split times, lactate threshold values and recovery times are critical elements to improving your fitness. To be a successful athlete, numbers are a big part of the equation—and most often the part that is over-appreciated.

A stopwatch requires power to measure time, but the value of its reading is only as good as the body’s ability to make it happen. As a result, nutrition is no less a culprit, perhaps even more, of the numbers game then splits. Where the focus of those numbers are placed, however, can have a huge impact on one’s overall performance.

Unfortunately, the weight of attention for the majority of society is almost exclusively placed upon calories, and the athlete is no exception. Sports nutrition is laden with formulas to help determine performance, but the daily diet of athletes is driven by calories, or caloric consumption, of carbohydrates, fats and proteins. Subsequently, the numbers, quantities and appearance of vitamins and minerals on the athlete’s plate have been marginalized and need resurgence in foundational nutrition. Without them, one’s macronutrients cannot be effectively utilized and converted into energy, which limits the body’s ability to perform and recover.

RELATED: 5 Tips For Maintaining Your Daily Diet

Just because you’re fit doesn’t mean you’re healthy, or vice versa. Knowing the difference between the two will go a long way to a sustainable lifestyle. Racing or recreational running doesn’t intrinsically make one healthy.

Athletes require more diligence in regard to their nutritional program as a result of the physical and emotional stresses placed upon the body. Its important to understand that nutrition is more then just carbohydrates, proteins and fats, and that fueling is not just about what you eat while training and racing. These three elements are critical, but it’s vitamins and minerals that allow for their conversion into a useable form of energy for the body. A deficiency in the supporting structures to one’s overall nutrition program can lead to diminished energy production, inefficient repair of tissues and cells, excessive weight and a depressed immune system—all of which contribute to sub-optimal performance. If you’ve experienced a plateau in your training, are overweight or have recurring injuries, an assessment of your micronutrients would be a good place to start.

Read more: Competitor.com

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Tim Reed, Meredith Kessler Win 70.3 Asia-Pacific Champs http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/news/tim-reed-meredith-kessler-win-70-3-asia-pacific-champs_111433 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/news/tim-reed-meredith-kessler-win-70-3-asia-pacific-champs_111433#comments Sat, 17 Jan 2015 23:10:35 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=111433

Australia’s Tim Reed and the United States’ Meredith Kessler kicked off their seasons with victories at a championship-level race.

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Australia’s Tim Reed and the United States’ Meredith Kessler kicked off their seasons with victories at a championship-level race at Sunday’s Ironman 70.3 Auckland. The race served as the Ironman 70.3 Asia-Pacific Championships, handing out a high number of KPR points (P-1500 level) and a larger prize purse ($75,000) than is typical at 70.3s.

Men’s Race
New Zealand’s Dylan McNeice led the men out of the water at 23:14, with Australia’s James Seear, Matt Franklin (NZL) and Ellice Clark (NZL) rounding out the first group into T1. Veterans Craig Alexander (AUS) and Cameron Brown (NZL) started the bike ride about one minute down. Reed also kicked off the bike race at about a minute back.

Three-time Ironman world champion Alexander took the lead early on in the bike and was eventually overtaken by New Zealand’s Mark Bowstead. As Bowstead broke away, 10 men behind him rode comfortably in a legal pack.

When bike turned to run, Bowstead’s lead stood at one minute over that group. Reed and Alexander showed the strong early run legs and looked to be chasing down the lead New Zealander. After one of two laps on the run, Reed held the lead with Leon Griffin (AUS) chasing at nine seconds back, Alexander at 36 seconds back and Brown at 52 seconds back.

Reed held onto his lead, finishing his day with a field-best 1:11:47 half-marathon to claim the 3:49:54 victory. Griffin had a strong day to finish second in 3:50:24, with Brown rounding out the top three in 3:51:19. Alexander finished fourth at 3:52:38 and McNeice earned fifth at 3:53:59, putting the entire top five at the finish line within about four minutes of each other.

Women’s Race
Kessler started her day with a dominant swim, exiting the water in 25:22. New Zealand’s Gina Crawford (26:40) and Amelia Watkinson (27:19) were next into transition, but Kessler was already well on her way to a substantial lead.

Kessler turned in a field-best 2:26:52 bike split to earn a two-minute lead over Crawford starting the run. Watkinson was third onto the half-marathon course at 4:27 back.

The American continued her dominance once on the run, posting a 1:25:21 split—giving her the fastest swim, bike and run of the women. She claimed the victory at 4:20:12. Crawford followed at 4:23:33 for second, with Watkinson grabbing third at 4:26:18. New Zealand’s Anna Russell and Julia Grant finished fourth and fifth, respectively.

It’s worth noting Kessler’s success at racing in New Zealand. The American also won Ironman New Zealand in Taupo in 2012, 2013 (on a shortened course) and 2014.

Ironman 70.3 Auckland – Ironman 70.3 Asia-Pacific Championships
Auckland, New Zealand – Jan. 18, 2015
1.2-mile swim, 56-mile bike, 13.1-mile run

Men
1. Tim Reed (AUS) 3:49:54
2. Leon Griffin (AUS) 3:50:24
3. Cameron Brown (NZL) 3:51:19
4. Craig Alexander (AUS) 3:52:38
5. Dylan McNeice (NZL) 3:53:59

Women
1. Meredith Kessler (USA) 4:20:12
2. Gina Crawford (NZL) 4:23:33
3. Amelia Watkinson (NZL) 4:26:18
4. Anna Russell (NZL) 4:33:28
5. Julia Grant (NZL) 4:40:49

Complete results.

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2015 Ironman 70.3 Auckland Start List http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/race-coverage/2015-ironman-70-3-auckland-start-list_111367 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/race-coverage/2015-ironman-70-3-auckland-start-list_111367#comments Thu, 15 Jan 2015 20:11:47 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=111367

Annabel Luxford won this race in 2013. Photo: Delly Carr

Several top names, including a couple of triathlon legends, will head to Auckland, New Zealand this Sunday.

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Annabel Luxford won this race in 2013. Photo: Delly Carr

Several top names, including a couple of triathlon legends, will head to Auckland, New Zealand this Sunday for the Ironman 70.3 Asia-Pacific Championships. As a championship-level event, the race will hand out valuable points toward this year’s Ironman World Championship and the Ironman 70.3 World Championships.

With the top two finishers, Jan Frodeno (GER) and Richie Cunningham (AUS)who won 70.3 Pucon last weekendnot on the start list, New Zealand’s own Terenzo Bozzone will wear the number one bib. He’ll take on up-and-coming 70.3 star Tim Reed (AUS), as well as veterans Cameron Brown (NZL) and three-time Ironman world champion Craig Alexander (AUS).

The reigning women’s winner Catriona Morrison (SCO) just announced her retirement from the sport, which means that there will also be a new champion on the women’s side. Last year’s runner-upand 2013 winnerAnnabel Luxford (AUS) will be the one to beat, with Meredith Kessler (USA) as the main contender. Look for New Zealand’s Gina Crawford to also make a run at the podium.

Pro Men
1. Terenzo Bozzone
2. Tim Reed
3. Cameron Brown
4. Craig Alexander
5. Tim Van Berkel
6. Paul Ambrose
7. James Seear
9. Leon Griffin
10. Joe Lampe
12. James Bowstead
13. Mark Bowstead
14. Simon Cochrane
15. Clark Ellice
16. Matt Franklin
17. Marcus Hultgren
18. Dylan McNeice
19. Callum Millward
21. Carl Read
22. Josh Rix
23. Reilly Smith
24. Leigh Stabryla

Pro Women
31. Annabel Luxford
32. Meredith Kessler
33. Gina Crawford
35. Amelia Watksinson
37. Melanie Burke
39. Kym Coogan
41. Julia Grant
42. Kristy Hallett
44. Anna Russell

RELATED PHOTOS: 2013 Ironman 70.3 Auckland

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Three Interval Sets To Improve Speed On The Bike http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/training/three-interval-sets-to-improve-speed-on-the-bike_69925 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/training/three-interval-sets-to-improve-speed-on-the-bike_69925#comments Thu, 15 Jan 2015 19:05:26 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=69925 Coach Gordo Byrn provides three sets that specifically address the limiters that he sees most often when working with athletes.

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Coach Gordo Byrn provides three cycling sets that specifically address the limiters that he sees most often when working with athletes.

1. To improve your performance on the flats, do Big Gear Intervals

Try 5×8 minutes in a big gear with 2-minute spinning recoveries.

Aim for 60 RPM in your TT position.

Use a threshold effort, where you build to a burning in the legs then back off a touch.

Keep your head up when riding fast!

RELATED: At-Home Time-Efficient Strength For Cycling

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Five Tips For Maintaining Your Daily Diet http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/nutrition/five-tips-for-maintaining-your-daily-diet_70138 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/nutrition/five-tips-for-maintaining-your-daily-diet_70138#comments Mon, 12 Jan 2015 17:03:32 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=70138

f you are properly choosing the right foods, the wrong ones are naturally excluded from the paradigm. Photo: www.shutterstock.com

Your sports nutrition plan is only as good as your foundation nutrition plan.

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f you are properly choosing the right foods, the wrong ones are naturally excluded from the paradigm. Photo: www.shutterstock.com

Your sports nutrition plan is only as good as your foundation nutrition plan. 

Eating properly to sustain an active lifestyle is a quandary we’re presented with time and again. Quite often the attempt to demystify one’s nutritional requirements becomes a minefield of information that is constantly being refreshed with new products, media frenetics, and the latest fad diet. Athletes are also challenged by performance product marketing—touting perfected formulas and guaranteed results—while the majority of sports nutrition is focused on the macronutrients of one’s diet, namely the carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. For all of the energy spent on these things it’s surprising how much focus and discussion remains in regard to what athletes don’t eat. For a population of people whose food intake is paramount to their success, this seems to be counterintuitive to those efforts. What gets lost in this discussion is the importance of one’s foundational diet: the daily consumption of vitamins, minerals, micronutrients, essential fatty acids, and amino acids that are all equally as essential to your nutritional program.

RELATED: The Imaginary Perfect Diet

Your sports nutrition plan is only as good as your foundation nutrition plan. Many athletes are missing the foundation of their nutrition: the micronutrients and elements that provide the platform for their diet that will, in turn, support the major ones. If you are properly choosing the right foods, the wrong ones are naturally excluded from the paradigm. Let’s take a look at the essential elements of a sound nutritional foundation and how to make them a part of your daily diet.

RELATED: 10 Biggest Sports Nutrition Myths

1. Micronutrients and Minerals

Studies have shown a varying decrease in available nutrients amongst almost all vegetables due to soil depletion resulting from improper agricultural techniques. Subsequently, unrelated studies have shown that the majority of the entire population is nutrient deficient in some way. As a result, we are SOS — a Society on Supplements. But, these are not real food and there is no supplementation for it. Micronutrients are responsible for anti-inflammation, anti-oxidants, anti-viral, respiratory and immune boosters, as well as cellular repair aids. These are your folic acids from greens like kale, arugula, and chard as well as your carotenoids, lignans, and flavonoids. For the athletes who are continually fighting off sickness or unable to completely recover from injury, this is the first place that I look. Minerals are required for proper functioning of muscle contractions, bone construction and ATP processing. Among the most common are calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, chloride, potassium, and sodium. Are you plagued with cramps, or unable to sustain longer workouts? Most often, I find this to be the answer. Increase your consumption of sea vegetables, lacto-fermented foods, bone broths, sprouted foods, bananas, and raw dairy.

2. Essential Fats

Unfortunately, fats have been demonized by society and athletes for all too long, leaving us with products void of any nutritional value or asset to our bodies. Vitamins A, D, E, and K are all fat soluble and crucial to the overall wellness of an individual. Omega 3, an essential fatty acid, plays a role in almost every major bodily function as well as a huge anti-inflammatory that can be found in fish oils as well as plant based oils. Scott Jurek, the world’s greatest distance runner, includes fatty acids into his daily diet.

 3. Amino Acids

These are the building blocks for proteins and metabolic acids, what its macronutrient relative requires for proper muscle repair.  The body does not store amino acids, which makes it a crucial component of one’s foundational nutrition. These can be found in a variety of food sources that help to support a diversity of foods in one’s diet. Sprouted nuts and seeds, grassfed meats, whole grains, like quinoa, and dried beans are all good sources of amino acids.

4. Enzymes

Your nutrition is only as good as your ability to absorb it. Ultimately, all of these foods have the inherent enzymes for digestion and bio-absorption of the necessary nutrients that your body needs. Logically, if one’s digestion is hampered or the product going in is inferior to begin with, the body will not get the nourishment that it needs. Processed foods and industrial agriculture have created digestive distress and nutrient deficiency as a result of stripped foods, synthetic fertilizers and chemical–cides. Your food needs to be fresh and as unadulterated as possible for your body to uptake it. Enzymes are what facilitate that process.

5. Bringing it All Together

The body will be much happier and capable of recognizing and processing food that it can relate to — not supplements, but whole foods that are as local, seasonal, and organically grown as possible. Leave the abacus and shopping list at home while you visit your local farmer’s market or food coop and purchase a changing diversity of products. Focusing on your foundational diet will keep you at and above your nutritional baseline as opposed to always trying to get there. Imagine your genetic potential once you have a solid platform to build upon!

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About The Author:

Adam Kelinson is the author of The Athlete’s Plate: Real Food for High Performance. His business, OrganicPerformance.com, is dedicated to restoring foundational nutrition for an active life of health and sustainability through workshops, retreats and performance cooking.

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Recipe Of The Week: Chicken Enchiladas http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/nutrition/recipe-of-the-week-chicken-enchiladas_70475 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/nutrition/recipe-of-the-week-chicken-enchiladas_70475#comments Thu, 08 Jan 2015 17:05:20 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2013/02/nutrition/recipe-of-the-week-chicken-enchiladas_70475

Once you make this recipe it will become a staple in your household.

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These enchiladas pack so much flavor, it’s hard to believe they are a healthy version. Once you make this recipe it will become a staple in your household. Even better they can be customized by adding more veggies and eliminating or substituting the meat. Also, they can be made ahead and stored in the fridge to bake off on a busy night and are a great batch meal to serve to a group or keep for leftovers. Keep in mind the first time you make these you will be learning the steps, but the second and third time they become much more routine!

Ingredients

2 Tbsp canola oil
1 medium, sweet yellow onion, thinly sliced
2 medium bell peppers (any color), seeds removed and thinly sliced
2 Tbsp chili powder
1 Tbsp cumin
1 tsp corriander (optional)
2 tsp agave or honey
½ tsp salt
1 rotisserie chicken, all meat removed and shredded
1- 16 oz can tomato sauce
1- 8 oz can tomato sauce
1/2 cup cilantro, finely chopped
2 4-oz can green chiles or pickled jalapenos (optional)
1 cup sharp reduced-fat cheddar cheese, grated
12 corn tortillas

Notes:

~ Depending on how full each tortilla is this recipe may make 10-14 enchiladas
~ Feel free to add more veggies like carrots, mushrooms, olives, black beans etc. to this dish

RELATED: Chili-Citrus Grilled Chicken And Veggie Bowl Recipe

Preparation

1. Heat oil in large french/dutch oven or pot over medium heat. Add onion and bell pepper and cook, stirring occasionally, until soft, about 8 min.
2. Add chili powder, cumin, coriander, agave or honey, and salt. Cook for about 1 minute, this will help to develop the flavor of the spices.
3. Add chicken, and stir to combine with the veggies and to coat with the spices.
4. Pour in both cans of tomato sauce and ½ cup water. Bring to low simmer for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.
5. Set a strainer in a large bowl. Pour the mix through the strainer so the sauce drains into the bowl, pressing on the chicken and veggies to extract as much sauce as possible. Reserve sauce.
6. In a large bowl, combine the chicken and veggie mixture with the cilantro, chilies or jalapenos, and 2/3 cup of the cheese.
7. Heat oven to 375 degrees. Coat a 13×9 baking dish with non-stick cooking spray. Pour ½ cup sauce on the bottom of the dish and spread it around.
8. Straight from the fridge, a corn tortilla is actually still raw. If you don’t cook it in some way not only will it taste stale, but it will be too stiff to roll and will tear apart. Wrap the tortillas in a slightly damp kitchen cloth, then microwave for 60 seconds until they are soft. Or toast the tortillas over a burner or in the oven so the outside crisps but they can still be rolled.
9. To assemble, place the tortillas on a large cutting board or counter space. Evenly disperse the chicken and veggie mixture into each of the tortillas. Roll them up tightly and place in baking dish (tightly together).
10. Pour the remaining amount of sauce over the top (there may be a little extra sauce you can reserve and keep warm to serve with the enchiladas). Sprinkle the remaining 1/3 cup cheese over the enchiladas. Spray a piece of foil with non-stick cooking spray and place that side down to cover the enchiladas (that way the cheese won’t stick to the foil). Bake covered for 40 minutes. Remove foil, bake 5-10 minutes longer. Let cool 10 minutes before serving.

Note: You can make the pan of enchiladas ahead of time and store in the fridge for up to 4 days. Increase the baking time by 15 minutes when they come out of a cold fridge.

Serving Recommendations:
~ salsa fresca or pico de gallo
~ avocado slices
~chopped cilantro
~ shredded lettuce
~ light sour cream
~ lime wedges
~ olives

More recipes from Jessica Cerra.

Jess Cerra is the owner of Fit Food by Jess, a private chef and catering company in Encinitas, Calif. Jess recently launched Harmony Bar, and all natural gluten-and soy free bar designed to tasted like a soft baked cookie. She is an ex-professional XTERRA triathlete and mountain biker, and current elite amateur road cyclist for the SPY GIANT RIDE p/b MRI Endurance team. Follow Jess’ recipes on her “Fit Food by Jess” Facebook page, as well as the “Harmony Bar” Facebook page. Also on twitter @fitfoodbyjess and @harmonybars.

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6 Myths About Triathlon Recovery http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/training/top-myths-about-recovery_57395 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/training/top-myths-about-recovery_57395#comments Wed, 07 Jan 2015 16:30:08 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=57395

Photo: Scott Draper

Here’s how to navigate the hype and get the most out of your body’s natural rebuilding efforts.

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Photo: Scott Draper


Rest and recovery might be the most important training you’re not doing. And there’s an explosion of products that want to help you do it better. Here’s how to navigate the hype and get the most out of your body’s natural rebuilding efforts. 

Can you shop your way to faster recovery and pack in a few more quality workouts this week? With the proliferation of recovery beverages, bars, clothes and devices on the market, it seems like it: Just do this/wear that and you’ll spring out of bed in the morning, ready for your next interval session.

Of course if it were that easy, we’d all be winning medals. So what does work to help you recover from a long or hard workout and get you ready to nail the next one?

“The world of recovery is a mixture of folklore and some science,” says William Sands, Ph.D., former director of the Recovery Center at the Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, Colo. And, he says, a lot of “I saw an athlete do X so it must work” reasoning. “It’s not always wrong, but much of the time it is. And unfortunately, a lot of the science that should be straightening out all of these recovery questions is still in the beginning stages,” says Sands, who’s currently the director of education at the National Strength and Conditioning Association. That means there’s a big gray area for myths to grow in. Here’s the truth about some of the more popular ones:

Myth: I don’t really need all the recovery days my coach gives me.

Truth: Sure, tough workouts that leave you fatigued are essential to hitting your goals. But so are days and weeks when you’re not doing that. “You dig the hole, and that’s OK,” says Sands. “But you have to fill the hole and then make a hill to improve your performance. The worst thing you can do is dig a hole and keep on digging. If you don’t rest properly, you can sabotage your training.”

“It’s easy for athletes to think that if they’re going hard, they’re getting fitter. That’s not true,” says Matthew Weatherley-White, co-founder of a popular-among-pros online tool called Restwise that helps athletes know how recovered they are. “Hard work creates the conditions for physiological adaptations. And adaptation happens during recovery. If you don’t hit the best stress-to-recovery balance, you’re not optimizing your training.”

RELATED: Eight Reasons Your Coach Hates You

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Reviewed: The Bell Star Pro http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/12/gear-tech/reviewed-bell-star-pro_111005 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/12/gear-tech/reviewed-bell-star-pro_111005#comments Wed, 31 Dec 2014 13:48:24 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=111005

With the vents closed, the Bell Star Pro is just as quick as other minimally vented helmets on the market. With the vents open, it is slightly cooler and slightly less aerodynamic, though the large section at the front with no venting gets pretty toasty on hot days. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

What separates the Star Pro from other aero helmets is a convertible vent system on the sides and rear of the helmet.

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With the vents closed, the Bell Star Pro is just as quick as other minimally vented helmets on the market. With the vents open, it is slightly cooler and slightly less aerodynamic, though the large section at the front with no venting gets pretty toasty on hot days. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

The latest generation of road helmets walks the line between aero helmets, like the Giro Air Attack, and the ventilation-heavy helmets of years past. These helmets, like the Giro Synthe and Kask Protone, offer ventilation that comes close to the featherweight helmets of the mid-2000s but with a consideration for aerodynamics.

What separates the Star Pro from other aero helmets is a convertible vent system on the sides and rear of the helmet. A small slider opens and closes these vents. When closed, Bell claims the Star Pro is faster than all challengers, and with the vents open Bell claims the Star Pro is still quite slippery in the wind, which I’m tempted to believe based on the Star Pro’s ventilation—or lack thereof—even when the switch is open.

The only helmet with a similar open/close design is the Kask Infinity. But on that one, the whole top of the helmet slides open.

On the road

The Star Pro is by no means a lightweight, highly ventilated helmet for climbing on hot days. On hotter days in the sun, the Star Pro heats up, especially in the forehead area where it lacks traditional vents. It has brow vents instead, between the forehead pad and the EPS foam. Theses vents require a good bit of speed before air starts traveling into them and across the head. The brow padding is a bit lacking; while comfortable, it did not absorb sweat as well as I’d like.

When opened, the vents pull air across the back of the head. A decent-sized exhaust port opens up that pulls air from the brow vents. It’s with the vents open that I really noticed the front of my head getting hotter than the back. Still, this small amount of venting can make a big difference on a hot day compared to other sparsely ventilated aero road helmets. It cools far better than the Air Attack, for example. On a hot day with long climbs and slow speeds when air doesn’t flow easily through the Star Pro’s smaller vents, a lightweight helmet like the Lazer Z1 would be our choice.

The Star Pro is available with a large Zeiss shield lens. The lens is sharp enough, which is unsurprising considering Zeiss’ stellar reputation, and the shield snapped in and out of the helmet with ease. But I still prefer sunglasses and, admittedly, I only rode with the shield once.

Read the complete review at Velonews.com.

RELATED: Giro Air Attack Shield Helmet Review

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