Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com Triathlon Training, Gear, Nutrition, Photos, Race Results & Calendars Wed, 28 Jan 2015 11:05:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0.1 Dear Coach: When Can I Get Back To Speedwork? http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/training/dear-coach-when-can-i-get-back-to-speedwork_93383 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/training/dear-coach-when-can-i-get-back-to-speedwork_93383#comments Wed, 28 Jan 2015 11:05:24 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=93383

Photo: TandemStock

Ah, speedwork. It hurts so good! But alas, if it hurts so bad, you can derail your season before it even gets started.

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Photo: TandemStock

How can I safely get back into speedwork after running inconsistently for the past couple of months?

Ah, speedwork. It hurts so good! But alas, if it hurts so bad, you can derail your season before it even gets started.

How we ramp into training mode is critical to how we race, and running is where the majority of injuries tend to emerge. I like a steppingstone approach that ensures the right type of work at the right time.

RELATED: Beginning Runner’s Speed Workout

Step 1: Pre-hab.  This is what keeps you out of rehab. Our studio is conveniently located within Finish Line Physical Therapy—a great, athlete-focused PT in NYC. All of our athletes go through their pre-hab screening. It provides a baseline for mobility, gait, flexibility and balance.

Step 2: Know thyself. Identify your strengths and weaknesses through a simple SWOTT analysis: strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, timing (when you work out, scheduling commitments), toys (gear at your disposal).

Step 3: Get your run on. I love to see four to six weeks of goal-oriented baseline running. Staying off the hills and track, I recommend two runs per week of 60–90 minutes capping the heart rate at an endurance level and focusing on stride cadence.

After a warm-up, run three to four miles at an endurance-level heart rate on the same route each week. Let’s say week one the pace of those miles was 9:10. By week four we would like to see that pace drop while the heart rate remains the same.

Step 4: Put speed skills before speedwork. Running fast is a skill to be developed: It comes from posture, foot speed and drive. Practice going fast with stride-outs and fartlek runs as a start, then graduate to the track. Great form will make you faster; poor form will always be a limiting factor.

RELATED: Gain Power And Efficiency To Become A Better Triathlete

Follow Triathlete on Twitter @Triathletemag for inspiration, new workout ideas, gear reviews from our editors and more.

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One-Hour Workout: Treadmill Hill Climbs http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/training/one-hour-workout-treadmill-hill-climbs_111756 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/training/one-hour-workout-treadmill-hill-climbs_111756#comments Tue, 27 Jan 2015 20:40:09 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=111756

Photo: Shutterstock.com

The treadmill can be a valuable training tool when the harsh realities of winter threaten to compromise the quality of your key workouts.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

Every Tuesday we’ll feature a different coach’s workout you can complete in 60 minutes (or less!).

The treadmill doesn’t have to be synonymous with the dreadmill, especially when icy roads, heavy snow and extreme cold threaten to wreak havoc on your winter training. It can be a valuable training tool when the harsh realities of winter threaten to compromise the quality of your key workouts.

Inserting a little variety into your treadmill workouts not only helps break up the boredom of running in place, it will also catapult you into kick-ass shape when running outside isn’t an advisable option.

“My advice is to vary the incline and speed on your treadmill runs,” coach Greg McMillan wrote for Competitor.com. “Don’t just set the pace and leave it. Run up some hills—some small and some large. Visualize your outdoor routes and mimic their terrain on the treadmill. And adjust your pace from time to time.”

Three-time Mount Washington Road Race winner Eric Blake does many hill workouts on the treadmill to simulate the demanding inclines of the 7.6-mile all-uphill route. You don’t have to go quite as steep as the 10-12 percent grades he tries to replicate, but hitting some long hill repeats on the treadmill over the winter will keep you from getting bored and help build a solid foundation of strength to power you through your spring speed workouts.

RELATED: Three Running Workouts For The Treadmill

Hill Climbs

Warm-up
1-3 miles of easy running, followed by 6 x 20-second strides

Main Set
Increase the incline on your treadmill to a 6-8 percent grade and perform 6-8 half-mile “climbs” at your 10K race pace with 3-4 minutes of easy, flat running between reps.

Cool-down
1-3 miles of easy running

Get two more treadmill sessions at Competitor.com.

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Treatment And Prevention Of Achilles Injuries http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/training/med-tent-the-basics-of-achilles-injuries_71666 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/training/med-tent-the-basics-of-achilles-injuries_71666#comments Tue, 27 Jan 2015 19:41:23 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=71666

Split jump.

Fix and prevent pain in your Achilles tendon with these stretches and exercises.

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Split jump.

Fix and prevent pain in your Achilles tendon with these stretches and exercises.

The symptoms

Pain in the back of the heel, the tendon just above it, or possibly up to where the calf muscles form a “V” on the back of the leg. The pain can be mild to debilitating.

What’s going in there?

The Achilles is a thick, ropelike tendon about 4 inches long connecting muscles in the lower leg to their insertion points at the heel bone.

The most common injury location is the muscle-tendon junction, where the muscles converge into the tendon. These injuries tend to heal spontaneously, but not as quickly as an injury higher up the leg, in the muscular area, because the blood flow isn’t as generous.

The most serious Achilles injury is to the tendon itself. Inflammation of the tendon, called tendinitis, and chronic inflammation with fluid buildup, called tendinosis, are the most common of this type.

RELATED VIDEO: Prevent Achilles Tendon Strains

Prevent it

The best way to prevent Achilles tendinitis in the first place is by building limber lower legs. An underlying lack of flexibility, especially in your calf muscles, can be a primary cause of Achilles injuries. These exercises target your lower leg and can be added to any workout.

Split jump (with or without dumbbells)
Stand in a staggered stance, your right foot in front of your left. Lower your body as far as you can. Quickly switch directions and jump with enough force to propel both feet off the floor. While in the air, scissor-kick your legs so you land with the opposite leg forward. Repeat, alternating back and forth
with each repetition.

Farmer’s walk on toes
Grab a pair of heavy dumbbells and hold them at your sides at arm’s length. Raise your heels and walk forward (or in a circle) for 60 seconds. Be sure to stand as tall as you can and stick your chest out.

Fix it

Employ dynamic rest. With Achilles injuries, in general, swimming is fine and biking can work, but only if it’s pain-free. Running is a huge no-no and will make the injury worse.

Ice it. Applying ice to the area for 15 minutes 4–6 times a day can help reduce inflammation and swelling.

Stretch it. I don’t advocate stretching if it brings pain. Once you can do so without pain, do the classic runner’s stretch with your hands against a wall.

Strengthen it. A tendon like the Achilles starts to hurt because of the load on it. If you want to reduce the loading force, build up the muscles affecting that load so they can take the brunt of it. Start with eccentric calf raises: Stand with your heels hanging off a step, take 10 seconds to lower them, then raise them back up at a normal rate. Also add in plenty of plyometric lower-body work like squats, multidirectional lunges, squat thrusts, and so on.

New York City sports medicine specialist  Jordan D. Metzl, M.D. is a 29-time marathon runner and 10-time Ironman finisher. His new book, The Athlete’s Book of Home Remedies, has more than 1,000 tips to fix all types of injuries and medical conditions.

RELATED – Med Tent: What Should I Do About An Aching Achilles Tendon?

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How To Prepare For Your Bike Fit http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/gear-tech/prepare-for-your-bike-fit_73387 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/gear-tech/prepare-for-your-bike-fit_73387#comments Tue, 27 Jan 2015 19:34:52 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=73387 Help your bike fitter help you with these three steps to ensure you get the right fit.

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Help your bike fitter help you with these three steps to ensure you get the right fit.

Companies are constantly devising new fit methodologies and tools dedicated to your comfort and performance on a bike. But when you sign up for a fit, how do you know what you’re getting? Here are three steps to ensure you find the best fit.

Step 1: Evaluate your needs

Your pre-fit process starts by paying attention to how you feel on your bike. Do your feet go numb? Is the saddle causing you issues? Take notes after rides and bring them to your fit.

RELATED: Bike Fit Fixes

Step 2: Do the research

Certifications: Familiarize yourself with the various bike fit certifications. Specialized BodyGeometry Fit, F.I.S.T. Fit, Retül Fit and Serotta Fit are some of the most prominent. Use each database of certified fitters to find someone in your area, or an area you are willing to travel to (often an overlooked option). The certifications will ensure a level of quality control from your fitter, but the person is ultimately most important.

Fit technology: Generally, better fitters invest in better technology to enhance their fit skills. A basic understanding of the various fit technology options allows you to make an educated choice about which is right for you and draw greater benefit from the process.

Triathlon knowledge: Even though all fit curricula teach triathlon fit, make sure your potential fitter understands triathlon bikes and triathletes.

Fitter reputation: Use local or regional tri groups and their forums to get feedback on fitters they like and why.

RELATED: Bike Geometry Explained

Step 3: Ask some questions

To ensure the fitter is qualified and correct for you, ask these questions before booking your appointment:

•  Does the fitter use techniques to address any specific injury or medical concerns?

•  Is the fitter familiar with your bike model? Do they have the tools/parts necessary to make any modifications?

•  How long have they been fitting triathletes? Although the value of years spent fitting can’t be replaced, experience in the sport is also important.

Now you are ready to book your appointment. During the fit appointment, make sure you communicate honestly what you are feeling and experiencing when changes are made. After the fit, listen to your body. If your body is not adapting well to a change after a few rides, book a follow-up appointment to address any issues. The fitter’s job is to pinpoint your optimum setup, so don’t be shy about achieving that shared objective.

No two fits are equal, nor are two fitters exactly the same. Even though you can sign up for the same service at a store or the same branded fit style, the position you leave with ultimately comes down to the fitter and the feedback you give them. With a little research and time spent listening to your body, you should walk away from your next fit more empowered to tackle your goals.

RELATED: Get Low

Ryan Ignatz is the fit manager at Boulder, Colo.’s Colorado Multisport.

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Ironman Announces 70.3 Durban In South Africa http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/news/ironman-announces-70-3-durban-south-africa_111752 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/news/ironman-announces-70-3-durban-south-africa_111752#comments Tue, 27 Jan 2015 18:45:10 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=111752

Durban, South Africa. Photo: Shutterstock.com

Ironman today revealed that it is adding Ironman 70.3 Durban to its South Africa race lineup.

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Durban, South Africa. Photo: Shutterstock.com

Ironman today revealed that it is adding Ironman 70.3 Durban to its South Africa race lineup, which already includes Ironman 70.3 South Africa in Buffalo City and Ironman South Africa in Nelson Mandela Bay. The Standard Bank Ironman 70.3 Durban triathlon will take place on Aug. 2, 2015.

Durban, located on South Africa’s west coast in the KwaZulu-Natal province, is known for its warm, subtropical climate and world-famous surfing beaches with a unique cultural and urban diversity. Durban was recently named one of the New7Wonder Cities of the World, recognized for cultural, historical, environmental, economic and tourism strengths and/or potential.

“We are very excited to announce Ironman 70.3 Durban,” said Keith Bowler, Managing Director for Ironman South Africa.”The popularity of triathlon in South Africa is on the riseand athletes have long awaited the introduction of an additional race in the region. Durban is a great location that is also one of the original South African triathlon hotbeds, with the South African pioneers of the sport thriving in the 1980s. We are therefore delighted to offer the Ironman 70.3 experience to the people of Durban and to welcome our international athletes to the east coast city,”

The 2015 Standard Bank Ironman 70.3 Durban will have 30 qualifying slots to the 2016 Ironman 70.3 World Championship taking place in Sunshine Coast, Queensland, Australia.

Registration will open Feb. 2 at 2 p.m. CET. Learn more at Ironman.com/durban70.3.

RELATED: Is Stellenbosch The New Boulder?

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2015 Spring Triathlete Magazine Training Camp Registration Open Now! http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/news/2015-spring-triathlete-magazine-training-camp-registration-open-now_111741 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/news/2015-spring-triathlete-magazine-training-camp-registration-open-now_111741#comments Tue, 27 Jan 2015 17:28:59 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=111741

Join us for an exclusive five-day training camp, where participants will be training alongside the editors and top pros.

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Pull Buoy For Beginners http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/training/pull-buoy-beginners_111716 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/training/pull-buoy-beginners_111716#comments Tue, 27 Jan 2015 17:09:27 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=111716

Photo: John David Becker

Here’s your guide to get the most out of this simple, effective tool, which can help build upper-body strength.

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Photo: John David Becker

If you’ve seen the hourglass-shaped pull buoy on the pool deck but haven’t tried using it yet, here’s your guide to get the most out of this simple, effective tool, which can help build upper-body strength, especially when paired with a set of paddles.

Starter Tips

– Try not to kick excessively. However, a light flick of the lower leg to help with torso rotation is OK.
– Do not point your toes! Let your legs float behind you. Aggressive toe pointing could lead to calf cramps.
– Improve your balance by adjusting the position of the buoy along the length of your legs. Observe how you make adjustments when the buoy is between your ankles, shins, knees, lower thighs, etc.

RELATED: How Often Should Swim Tools Be Used?

FAQ’s

Q: Which end goes up?
A: Most buoys have a larger side. There is no specific answer for this question, but I recommend putting the large side toward your butt so there is less underwater drag and fits most comfortably.

Q: What do I do if the buoy doesn’t support my legs?
A: Use TWO buoys! Hold one buoy just below your crotch and another just above your knees.

Q: Is there a pull buoy option for petite athletes?
A: Yes, many swim companies sell a “junior” buoy that is smaller and less buoyant than the adult size. A quick online search will bring up a few options.

RELATED: Pull Buoy Basics

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Chef Gordon Ramsay Talks Nutrition http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/features/chef-gordon-ramsay-talks-nutrition_111734 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/features/chef-gordon-ramsay-talks-nutrition_111734#comments Tue, 27 Jan 2015 16:24:00 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=111734

Photo: Casey Rodgers/Invision for IRONMAN/AP Images

Celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay chats about fueling while preparing to compete in a triathlon and shares some healthy recipes.

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Photo: Casey Rodgers/Invision for IRONMAN/AP Images

Celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay chats about fueling while preparing to compete in a triathlon and shares some healthy recipes.

If there’s one thing Gordon Ramsay knows about, it’s food.

The chef, who is also a keen triathlete, is gathering a group of 100 individuals to take part in a new Ironman triathlon event in Britain this summer.

The Ironman 70.3 Triathlon will take place in Staffordshire on June 14. The chef is now calling for entrants to join Team Ramsay, where they will receive guidance, equipment and support, including, of course, dietary advice.

But Ramsay has shared some of his favorite recipes to help the rest of us improve our health and fitness, and get the best out of ourselves. “Fuel is so important,” he says. “Everyone thinks the more you train, the less you eat, but not so.”

The chef puts stress on choosing the right foods—and eating at the right times—as the key. But he is at an advantage when it comes to this way of eating. “The triathlon lifestyle fits into the chef’s lifestyle,” he admits. “I don’t have breakfast, lunch and dinner. I eat five times a day— small portions.”

Read more and get 3 recipes from Ramsay at Telegraph.co.uk.

RELATED VIDEO: Gordon Ramsay’s Triathlete Magazine Photo Shoot

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Are Ice Baths A Waste Of Time? http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/training/everything-know-ice-baths-wrong_111730 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/training/everything-know-ice-baths-wrong_111730#comments Tue, 27 Jan 2015 13:32:02 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=111730

Photo: Shutterstock.com

New research shows ice baths aren’t all they’re made out to be.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

New research shows ice baths aren’t all they’re made out to be.

It’s a love/hate routine with triathletes: Peeling off the sweaty tri shorts after a long brick workout to soak in a tub full of ice water. It isn’t comfortable, but it’s necessary to accelerate recovery.

Or is it?

New research published in the January issue of Journal of Sports Sciences claim cold-water immersion “have no benefit in promoting recovery.” The study, which evaluated 24 male athletes after strenuous exercise, compared athletes without an ice bath to those in standing and seated cold-water immersion. Various markers of physiological stress, including Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS), were measured before and up to 72 hours following the test.

“There is strong evidence that suggests that athletes feel better after an ice bath, which is likely why they are so popular,” says Dr. Jonathan Leeder of the English Institute of Sport, who led the study. “However if you objectively measure how indices such as muscle strength and power recover after an ice bath, the evidence is far less conclusive, with many research studies showing no effect.”

RELATED: Rethinking Ice Baths And Ibuprofen

In fact, Leeder says new evidence suggests using ice baths may have a negative effect on adaptation to training: “It is suggested that the cold water blunts inflammation, but inflammation is a critical aspect of the repair and adaptation process, so it potentially shouldn’t be manipulated.”

For this reason, Leeder only endorses ice baths in competition scenarios, where the feel-good factor is important but training gains are not the focus.

Leeder, who also serves as a Physiologist for the British Cycling Team, suggests athletes in training skip the ice baths for a snack and a nap instead:

“There are three basics to optimal recovery for athletes: optimal nutrition, sleep and rest. It is our belief that the benefits of doing these three things well far outweighs the ice bath. A well-periodized training plan that allows for high-quality rest, alongside proper sleep and nutrition, is the best form of recovery.”

RELATED – Race Recovery: The Importance Of Sleep

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Ironman And Life Time Announce “Women For Tri” Board Advisors http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/news/ironman-life-time-announce-women-tri-board-advisors_111728 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/news/ironman-life-time-announce-women-tri-board-advisors_111728#comments Tue, 27 Jan 2015 01:25:06 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=111728

Triathlete Editor-in-Chief Julia Polloreno is one of 12 women who will develop a five year-strategy and action plan for the women For Tri

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Ironman and Life Time today announced the members that will make up its founding Women For Tri Board of Advisors. Triathlete Editor-in-Chief Julia Polloreno is one of 12 women who will develop a five year-strategy and action plan for the women For Tri initiative.

See the announcement from Ironman and Life Time and learn about the 12 board members below:

The two organizations launched the Women For Tri initiative with a vision to welcome and empower new female triathletes to be part of the sport’s continued exponential growth. A board selection committee led by Ironman and Life Time reviewed more than 650 applications and narrowed the field to 12. The team of appointed influential women, who collectively represent an impressive wealth of professional and personal achievements, were selected to develop a five-year strategy and action plan for the movement.

“We are very pleased with the tremendous outpouring of interest in this initiative, choosing just 12 women for the board was certainly not easy. I would like to thank all of the applicants for sharing in our passion to develop female participation and grow the sport of triathlon,” said Andrew Messick, Chief Executive Officer for Ironman. “Women For Tri will play a very important role in the future success of triathlon and we look forward to collaborating with Life Time and the Board of Advisors on this initiative.”

The new board will work to unite and empower female athletes of all ages and fitness levels by breaking down barriers to entry and helping more women accomplish their fitness goals in a sport that continues to thrive internationally. Both Ironman and Life Time consider the recent and continued growth of female participants in triathlon of vital importance to the sport and endurance industry. Recently, Life Time powered by Ironman held an Indoor Triathlon Hour at 77 Life Time destinations nationwide that saw a female participation rate of 54 percent.

“The Iron Girl series (owned and operated by Ironman) and the Esprit de She series (owned and operated by Life Time) both continue to see enormous growth among new triathletes,” says Kimo Seymour, Senior Vice President, Life Time Media and Events. “The goal of Women For Tri is to mobilize greater interest in the sport and provide an approachable, accessible and meaningful platform for women to achieve their fitness ambitions through triathlon.”

One of the areas of focus for this initiative will be the creation of a Women For Tri Ambassador Team to develop and lead a networking and social community for women in triathlon. The Ambassador Team will mentor and help cultivate new athletes, while providing support to first timers throughout their training all the way to the finish line. The community will remain connected via social media through the #womenfortri hashtag.

The inaugural Women For Tri Board of Advisors includes:

Meredith Atwood – Roswell, GA
Attorney, Blogger, Author

Meredith authored Triathlon for the Every Woman, a funny, informative book that empowers women of all backgrounds to become triathletes. She’s an attorney as well as a USAT Level 1, Youth and Junior certified triathlon coach, and contributor to Triathlete magazine. Meredith completed her first Ironman triathlon in 2013 and blogs at SwimBikeMom.com.

Hillary Biscay – Tucson, AZ
Professional Triathlete, Owner Smashfest Queen, Inc.

Hillary is a professional triathlete and coach with 66 full distance finishes under her belt, including a win at Ironman Wisconsin. She’s also the first person to record six top 5 Ironman triathlon finishes in one season. Hillary is the Co-Founder of Smashfest Queen, Inc., a women’s sport and casual apparel company.

Bonni Brooks – Fairbanks, AK
National Director, Team In Training

Bonni is a National Director for Team In Training at the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, providing coaching and team support for participants in a variety of athletic events across the world. Team In Training athletes, in exchange for training and support, raise money towards cures for blood cancers like leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma. In total, Team In Training has trained more than 500,000 runners, walkers, triathletes, cyclists and hikers, raising more than $1.4 billion to fund lifesaving research.

Casey Cortese – Denver, CO
Vice President Marketing, Transamerica

Casey is a marketing expert with several strategic ties to the active lifestyle and business communities. She’s also responsible for the creation of several award-winning sponsorship programs, most notably the Janus Charity Challenge, a national triathlon-based fundraising initiative which raised nearly $55 million for charities throughout the U.S. In February 2015, she’ll be working to complete a half marathon on every continent.

Leesa Eichberger – Encinitas, CA
CMO, Consultant

Leesa has over 20 years of experience in consumer marketing, and was most recently the CMO of Jenny Craig. While at Jenny Craig, she was named one of the Top 100 CMOs on Twitter. She has a passion for health, wellness and fitness, and has been an active triathlete since 2007. Leesa also serves on the Board of Directors for the California Avocado Commission.

Moira Horan – Spring Lake Heights, NJ
Co-Founder, Jersey Girls StayStrong Multisport Club

Moira has participated in countless marathons, Ironman, Ironman 70.3 and other triathlons since 1993. Her focus over the past several years has been on sharing her experiences and training others as a USA Triathlon Coach Certified Level 1 and Level 2 Total Immersion Swim instructor. She founded the Jersey Girls Triathlon in 2010 and started the Jersey Girls StayStrong Foundation in 2012.

Cris Howard – Reston, VA
Global Project Director, Covance

Cris created the Well Steps program providing turnkey wellness solutions such as individual health coaching to companies large and small. Johnson & Johnson awarded Well Steps program with its Chairman Award and implemented the program in a series of clinical trials spanning 41 countries. Cris has eight years of triathlon experience.

Katherine Kelly Lang – Hollywood, CA
Emmy-Award Winning Actress

Katherine is an Emmy-Award winning producer, actress, spokesperson/ambassador of Breakaway from Cancer and avid triathlete. Her love for the sport and extensive social media following will help the initiative reach a new audience, empowering a large group of her supporters to try the sport. Katherine has competed in two Ironman 70.3 events and plans to do an Ironman triathlon this year.

Brooke Mallick – Chicago, IL
Marketing Manager, Gatorade

As a part of the Gatorade team, Brooke was charged with running G-Feat, an initiative Gatorade implemented internally to encourage its employees to be more active. G-Feat’s main pillars of focus: education, training and competition, and athlete outreach, which are synergetic with the work the Women For Tri board will be tasked to carry out. She has participated in multiple triathlons, including the Ironman 70.3 Racine triathlon.

Julia Beeson Polloreno – San Diego, CA
Editor-in-Chief, Triathlete magazine

Julia is the Editor in Chief of Triathlete magazine, and is deeply rooted in the sport of triathlon. She will be instrumental in content development and education for both beginner and elite athletes. Julia, a mother of two children, is a multiple-time Ironman and Ironman 70.3 finisher.

Kyrsten Sinema – Phoenix, AZ
U.S. Representative, Arizona – 9th Congressional District

Kyrsten is the first sitting Member of Congress to complete an Ironman triathlon. She also enjoys competing in Life Time Tri and Esprit de She events in her home state of Arizona. Kyrsten has previous experience bringing women into the sport and is passionate about the opportunity to use her influence to drive Women For Tri.

Dr. Karen Smith – Newport Coast, CA
Sr. VP Global Head, R&D, Allergen

Karen is a frequent speaker at Women in Business, and sits on the Board of Advisors of the California Chapters for Girl Scouts and the Susan G Komen Foundation in Orange County. She won the 2014 Orange County Women in Business Award, and is known as a respected leader in the community with an extensive background in business and the health/medical field. She recently completed her seventh Ironman triathlon.

For more information about the Women For Tri movement, visit Ironman.com/womenfortri.

RELATED: Ironman And Life Time Announce “Women For Tri” Initiative

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Six Weeks To New Run Speed http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/training/six-weeks-new-run-speed_111718 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/training/six-weeks-new-run-speed_111718#comments Mon, 26 Jan 2015 20:41:33 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=111718

Photo: Ryan Bethke/Competitor.com

Add in these three key sessions per week to PR at your next 5K, 10K or half-marathon.

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Photo: Ryan Bethke/Competitor.com


Add in these three key sessions per week to PR at your next 5K, 10K or half-marathon.

Want to translate your hard-earned triathlon fitness into some running personal bests? Try this simple six-week plan that focuses on two or three key workouts per week to get you race fit.

This plan assumes you have been running 3–5 hours per week, are injury-free and have recovered fully from your “A” race. You can still do the other two disciplines, but keep your “quality” work around running. Depending on your fitness level and typical volume per week, you can work in other easy runs outside of this schedule.

5K Key Sessions

Week 1
– 6×400 at 5K pace
– Fartlek run with 8×30” surges building up to 3K pace
– Easy long run of 6 miles

Week 2
– Tempo run: 2×12’ with 3’ easy between (Zone 4 or slightly slower than 10K pace)
– 2×1 mile 5K goal pace with 4–5’ easy between each
– Easy long run of 8 miles

Week 3
– 8×400 at 5K pace
– Fartlek run with 10×45” surges to 3K pace
– Easy long run of 7 miles

Week 4
– Tempo run: 2×15’ with 3’ easy between (Zone 4 or slightly slower than 10K pace)
– 3×1 mile at target 5K race pace with 4–5’ easy between each
Easy long run of 8 miles

Week 5
– 5×400 at 5K pace
– 2×1 mile 5K goal pace with 4–5’ easy between each
– Easy long run of 6 miles

Week 6

– Early in the week, 30’ run with 5×1’ at 5K goal pace
Note: Total run time is 30% of base weekly run time aside from race.
Race!

RELATED: Should I Do 5K Or 10K Running Races During Training?

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Learn To Love The Pool (Really!) http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/training/learn-to-love-the-pool-really_45915 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/training/learn-to-love-the-pool-really_45915#comments Mon, 26 Jan 2015 20:23:03 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=45915

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Another solo swim workout? Here’s how to beat black-line boredom for good.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

Another solo swim workout? Here’s how to beat black-line boredom for good this winter.

1. Make your swim multitask. How often do you dream of getting away from it all, to a place where 10 e-mails aren’t pinging at you every second? Well, think of the pool as a meditation retreat, says Shane Alton Eversfield, author of Zendurance and master coach for Total Immersion Swim. With swimming, you get a meditative environment and a workout at the same time, he says. And you don’t even have to get on a (packed, delayed, stuffy) plane.

2. Switch your focus from execution to discovery. Don’t just bang out your prescribed workout. Instead, look at the workout as an experiment, says Debi Bernardes, founder of U Can Do It Coaching in King George, Va. Test a different head position or play with your catch.

RELATED: Swim Vocabulary 101

3. Stop thinking about the big picture. “Sometimes the end goal can seem so huge or daunting that it puts you off,” says distance swimmer Oliver Wilkinson. “You have to break it into little pieces; know what you’re achieving on that month, that day and that session itself.” When you’re in there, don’t get ahead of yourself. Just swim the set you’re in.

4. Learn fly. And backstroke and breaststroke. You’re not just switching it up to keep yourself humble. “Learning all four strokes has applications in making progress in freestyle,” says Chris Colburn, Ph.D., head coach of the Academy Bullets Masters in Aurora, Ill. People who can use all strokes, he says, are often the ones who have the most resilience in open water.

5. Make short and long sets different. “For shorter repeats, try to concentrate on what the set is all about,” says Colburn, who’s also on the U.S. Masters Swimming (USMS) Coaches Committee. “For longer repeats, try to maintain a rhythm. If you’re having a hard time with that, try singing a song in your head with the beat you want to maintain.” Or better yet, listen to actual music!

RELATED: How To Choose The Right Masters Lane

6. Rethink your distance.
One of the best ways to avoid boredom, says Scott Bay, head coach of Team Blu Frog Masters and coaches chair of USMS? “Stop swimming those crazy long sets! If you’ve done 27 marathons, ride 300 miles a week and have a resting pulse rate of 42, why are you trying to go 6000 yards in the pool? You’re already in aerobic shape.” Focus on quality swims rather than long swims.

7. Keep it interesting with an underwater music player.

RELATED: Should Beginners Self-Coach?

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Creative Ways To Prepare Zucchini http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/nutrition/creative-ways-to-prepare-zucchini_82780 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/nutrition/creative-ways-to-prepare-zucchini_82780#comments Mon, 26 Jan 2015 20:12:55 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=82780

Photo: John David Becker

Zucchini are low in calories at 15 calories per 100 grams, and also contain potassium, folate and vitamin A in appreciable amounts.

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Photo: John David Becker

What are some creative ways to prepare zucchini? 

Botanically speaking, zucchini are actually fruit—but nutritionally speaking, they’re considered a vegetable. And as such, they’re generally consumed cooked. Zucchini are low in calories at 15 calories per 100 grams, and also contain potassium, folate and vitamin A in appreciable amounts. My favorite, simple way to enjoy zucchini is to cut them lengthwise, coat lightly with olive oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and grill. Zucchini pancakes are another favorite—with breakfast, as a snack or side. Simply wash and grate the zucchini, add flour, egg, Parmesan cheese and pepper to taste, then bake. For a special splurge, buy zucchini flowers. Stuff them with cheese, such as ricotta, lightly batter and then fry. (You can also stuff and bake them, instead of frying.)

RELATED – Recipe Of The Week: Veggie And Turkey Stuffed Peppers

Lauren Antonucci, R.D., is a board-certified specialist in sports dietetics, three-time Ironman and founding director of Nutrition Energy in NYC. If you’d like to have your nutrition questions answered on this page in the magazine, send an email to fuel@competitorgroup.com.

More nutrition answers from Lauren Antonucci.

Get the latest in triathlon training, gear, nutrition and news sent straight to your inbox. Sign up for Triathlete’s newsletter.  

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Vote: Best Bodies In Triathlon – Top 10 Women http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/photos/vote-best-bodies-triathlon-top-10-women_111696 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/photos/vote-best-bodies-triathlon-top-10-women_111696#comments Mon, 26 Jan 2015 18:07:58 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=111696

It's time to crown a female winner in our Best Bodies in Tri contest!

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Vote: Best Bodies In Triathlon – Top 10 Men http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/photos/vote-best-bodies-triathlon-top-10-men_111682 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/photos/vote-best-bodies-triathlon-top-10-men_111682#comments Mon, 26 Jan 2015 18:07:12 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=111682

It's time to crown a male winner in our Best Bodies in Tri contest!

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Stabilize Your Hips With This One-Minute Exercise http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/training/stabilize-hips-one-minute-exercise_72674 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/training/stabilize-hips-one-minute-exercise_72674#comments Mon, 26 Jan 2015 15:13:16 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=72674

The slideboard leg curl stabilizes the hips, activates the glutes and engages the hamstrings.

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In this video Tim Crowley and friends show us the slideboard leg curl, an excellent exercise for endurance athletes that stabilizes the hips, activates the glutes and engages the hamstrings.

RELATED: 3 Power Exercises To Strengthen Your Glutes

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9 Ways To Fartlek http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/training/9-ways-to-fartlek_51140 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/training/9-ways-to-fartlek_51140#comments Mon, 26 Jan 2015 12:00:35 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=51140

Photo: John Segesta

Fartlek, which means “speed play” in Swedish, involves varying the intensity to teach your body to recover quickly.

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Photo: John Segesta

If you’re getting bored with your predictable track sessions, it’s time you mixed it up with a fartlek workout—a creative, less-structured form of interval training. Fartlek, which means “speed play” in Swedish, involves varying the intensity to teach your body to recover quickly, no matter what level you’re at. The following workouts can all be done in 60 minutes or less, including a 10-minute easy warm-up.

Stoplights: Think of this workout in three speeds—hard (red), moderate (yellow), easy (green). Run 30 sec hard, 90 easy, 60 moderate, 60 easy, 90 hard, 3 min easy. Repeat three or four times.

Give me five: From zero to five minutes, run at a comfortable, normal pace. At the five-minute mark, increase your speed for one minute. Drop back to normal speed until the 10-minute mark. Do this on the 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, etc.

For the dogs: Coach Kristen Hislop has her Albany, N.Y., athletes do a fartlek in a local park with plenty of dogs. “They use passing the dogs as a flag to speed up or recover,” she says. “The smaller the dog, the faster they have to go!”

From the heart: If you train with a heart rate monitor, you can bounce between your various zones, including Zone 2/easy, Zone 3/tempo and Zone 4/hard. Do 20 minutes as: 3 easy, 5 tempo, 2 hard, 5 tempo, 2 hard, 3 easy. Follow that with 15 minutes as: 5 easy, 2 tempo, 1 hard, 2 tempo, 5 easy.

Mailboxes: Base your harder intervals on mailboxes. Make it random: Run hard for two mailboxes, recover for three, run hard for three, recover for two. Can also be done with streetlamps.

Treadmill hills: Walk “uphill” at a 6 percent incline for three minutes. Run at a 4 percent incline/6 mph for two minutes, then a 2 percent incline/6.5 mph for one minute, then a 1 percent incline/7 mph for 30 seconds. Recover with three minutes’ walking at zero percent. Every round, increase speed by 0.2 mph for every interval. (Adjust for ability level.)

Tour guide: Do a fartlek guided by a coach: Download a “runcast” from Energyfitnesscoaching.com. Coaches Rob and Kelly Wissolik lead you through either a 40- or 45-minute workout via your iPod.

Pushup break: When preparing for sprint triathlons, coach Tim Edwards does fartleks on a fitness course with steep hills. Replicate with or without a course: Stop every two to five minutes and do a round of pushups, situps, squats or short hill repeats throughout your run.

Pyramid: 1 min hard, 1 min easy, 2 hard, 2 easy, 3 hard, 3 easy, 2 hard, 2 easy, 1 hard, 1 easy (18 minutes total). The shorter the interval, the faster the pace.

More fartlek workouts from our friends at Competitor.com:

- The Short Fartlek
- The Halftime Fartlek
- Hudson’s 1-2-3-2-1 Fartlek

Follow Triathlete on Twitter @Triathletemag for inspiration, new workout ideas, gear reviews from our editors and more.

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Jodie Swallow Earns Fifth-Straight 70.3 South Africa Win http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/news/jodie-swallow-earns-fifth-straight-70-3-south-africa-win_111674 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/news/jodie-swallow-earns-fifth-straight-70-3-south-africa-win_111674#comments Sun, 25 Jan 2015 17:47:19 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=111674

Jodie Swallow dominated the swim, bike and run in Buffalo City.

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Great Britain’s Jodie Swallow had a stellar 2014 season, including a second-place finish at the Ironman 70.3 World Championship and a fourth-place finish at the Ironman World Championship, and looks to be building on that in 2015. She kicked off her year in the same fashion she has the last four years, with a victory at Ironman 70.3 South Africa in Buffalo City. South Africa’s Matt Trautman grabbed the win on the men’s side.

Men’s Race
It was a battle between Trautman and fellow South African Stuart Marais for much of the day. The two had nearly identical swim and bike splits, but it was Trautman’s 1:16:49 half-marathon that helped him earn the victory in 4:04:35. Marais also had a strong run at 1:18:19 but had to settle for second, finishing second in 4:06:04. Belgian Bart Aernouts rounded out the podium, crossing the line at 4:11:37.

Women’s Race
Swallow dominated the women’s race from the start, turning in the fastest swim, bike and run splits of the pro women. Her day consisted of a 24:41 swim, a 2:33:39 bike and a 1:28:08 half-marathon, giving her the victory in 4:30:54. Susie Cheetham (GBR) and Parys Edwards (GBR) made it an all-British podium, finishing at 4:41:49 and 4:47:45, respectively.

Ironman 70.3 South Africa
Buffalo City, East London, South Africa – Jan. 25, 2015
1.2-mile swim, 56-mile bike, 13.1-mile run

Men
1. Matt Trautman (RSA) 4:04:34
2. Stuart Marais (RSA) 4:06:03
3. Bart Aernouts (BEL) 4:11:36
4. Cyril Viennot (FRA) 4:14:28
5. Johannes Moldan (GER) 4:15:57

Women
1. Jodie Swallow (GBR) 4:30:53
2. Susie Cheetham (GBR) 4:41:
3. Parys Edwards (GBR) 4:47:44
4. Emma Bilham (SUI) 4:55:30
5. Jeani Seymour (RSA) 5:02:02

Complete results.

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ITU Update: U.S. Elites Compete in Cuba Triathlon http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/news/itu-update-u-s-elites-compete-cuba-triathlon_111670 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/news/itu-update-u-s-elites-compete-cuba-triathlon_111670#comments Sun, 25 Jan 2015 05:17:04 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=111670

Americans Renée Tomlin and Kirsten Kasper with USA Triathlon Board of Directors President Barry Siff.

ITU athlete Alan Webb contributed to this report. This weekend, 27 U.S. triathletes traveled to Cuba, making them some of the first

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Americans Renée Tomlin and Kirsten Kasper with USA Triathlon Board of Directors President Barry Siff.

ITU athlete Alan Webb contributed to this report.

This weekend, 27 U.S. triathletes traveled to Cuba, making them some of the first Americans to visit the country in over 50 years. (Read about how the opportunity came about here.)

The eight U.S. professional athletes in the group competed in Saturday’s CAMTRI Sprint Triathlon in Habana, beginning their 2015 journey for Olympic/ITU points.

The American women dominated the elite field with Renée Tomlin and Kirsten Kasper, both members of USA Triathlon’s Collegiate Recruitment Program (CRP), taking first and second. The third American woman, Rebeccah Wassner, came in 10th.

According to USAT National Development Coach Jarrod Evans—one of the few available for comment from Cuba because of limited Internet availability—the men’s race was “decimated by torrential rain” and the men finished without a finish line or many of the surrounding tents.

Of the five American men competing, CRP athletes Nick Karwoski and Robby Webster both finished in the top 10 (6th and 10th, respectively). Dan McIntosh finished 13th, Chris Foster finished 16th and Josh Izewski, who was in the lead group after the swim, crashed along with three other athletes at the start of the second lap of the bike, taking him out of the race.

The 19 age-group triathletes coming from the U.S. will race on Sunday. Check back this week on Triathlete.com for some first-hand accounts from the athletes about what it was like racing in Habana.

 

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ProFile: Daniela Ryf http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/features/profile-daniela-ryf_111662 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/01/features/profile-daniela-ryf_111662#comments Fri, 23 Jan 2015 19:59:34 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=111662

Daniela Ryf at the 2014 Ironman World Championship. Photo: John David Becker

Get to know the two-time Olympian, 2014 Ironman 70.3 world champion and runner-up to the 2014 Ironman World Championship crown.

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Daniela Ryf at the 2014 Ironman World Championship. Photo: John David Becker

As a two-time Olympian, 2014 Ironman 70.3 world champion, runner-up to the 2014 Ironman World Championship crown and Ironman Zurich and Ironman Copenhagen champion (both 2014), Daniela Ryf is hardly your average university student. But the 27-year-old native of Switzerland enjoys having a lot on her plate and hopes her pursuit of a degree in food science will someday lead her to develop foods geared toward enhancing athletic performance. Mentored by legendary coach Brett Sutton, the relative newcomer to long-course triathlon has inspired comparisons to former Sutton disciple Chrissie Wellington, and is a clear contender for future Ironman World Championship fame.

RELATED – Dispatch: Daniela Ryf’s Rookie Kona Performance

“I find it great how the Ironman athletes have a lot respect for each other and was surprised by the respect they gave to me as a newbie. It shows the character of our sport. I didn’t know many of them, and it was a great experience to meet athletes like Rachel Joyce and Mirinda Carfrae, [who] have been in the sport for so long. On the run in Kona, Chrissie Wellington supported me with some positive words. This was probably the most inspiring moment I had during the race. It meant a lot to me, as she’s been my role model since I’ve heard from Brett how tough she is. It’s my biggest goal to race like her one day—fearless and fast.”

“In St. Moritz this summer, Brett suddenly called me ‘Angry Bird.’ Apparently I make this face when I’m focused. I had no idea what Angry Birds is, so I checked it out online and found out that Stella is the only girl of the Angry Birds. Stella is described as ‘ambitious and loves taking [on] tough challenges. Hot tempered, gets bored when there’s nothing to do.’ This is pretty much spot on how I roll, so since then Brett has called me Stella or Angry Bird.”

“I believe walnuts are one of the best things to take on the bike. I had them in Copenhagen and also in Kona after about 90K. The fat and protein seem to help stabilize the sugar in the blood, and also help with concentration. I take about 50 grams, which is almost 300 calories. I had them going up the last bit of the hill toward Hawi, which brought me a bit out of breath, but also helped to get back new energy. I also prepared them for the run, but then I was running too scared to eat anything. I barely had any gels on the run, which probably was my biggest mistake of the day.”

RELATED – Daniela Ryf: My Goal Was To Win

“The best ideas I have for foods are on my long rides or two-hour runs on an empty stomach! For Kona 2015 I have a new idea for the aid stations—frozen banana on a stick, covered in dark chocolate and salt. That’s the perfect combination of something nice and cool, the energy of the banana, the fat and sugar of the chocolate and the salt so you can leave out the salt tablets. The implementation might be a challenge, but I’m sure [Ryf’s sponsor] Red Bull could sponsor some portable countertop freezers, so the aid stations could hand them out on the run course.”

“I love to spend quality time with friends and family. A good glass of wine, nice coffee, going to the movies or a day at the lake with them is on the top of my list. And I love nature, so I guess I picked a pretty good job for this.”

“To be honest, I don’t think I have had to sacrifice much for sport. Of course I had less free time when I was young, as I was busy with training, but I met great friends at my triathlon club, Wildcats. I trained with them every weekend in Basel [Switzerland] since I was 14 years old. We trained hard, but we also went out on Saturdays. The others were older, but I could sneak in the clubs with them! Through the sport I have been able to pay for most of my things by myself since I was 16, and by the time I was 20 I had seen half of the world.”

More triathlete ProFiles. 

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