Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com Triathlon Training, Gear, Nutrition, Photos, Race Results & Calendars Wed, 27 May 2015 15:35:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0.1 Try This Bike Workout: Standing Flats http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/training/try-this-bike-workout-standing-flats_56035 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/training/try-this-bike-workout-standing-flats_56035#comments Wed, 27 May 2015 15:35:59 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=56035

Photo: Tom Robertson

By getting comfortable with being out of the saddle, you can better control heart rate spikes from standing during a race.

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Photo: Tom Robertson

When Endurance Corner (Endurancecorner.com) founder Gordo Byrn was training under Ironman legend Dave Scott, he did a lot of workouts out of his comfort zone. Once, Scott asked Byrn his favorite cadence. He replied, “78.” Naturally Scott gave him many workouts with a 92rpm focus. “I hated 92,” Byrn says. “But it definitely worked.”

Scott advocated building a range of abilities for long-course racing, especially Ironman. “You want a toolbox with as many tools in it as possible,” Byrn says. “Position, cadence, all different things. When you get into a situation in a race, you have all of these tools you can pull out.” One bike workout Scott assigned for this purpose was 15 minutes standing on the flats. By getting comfortable with being out of the saddle in training, you can better control heart rate spikes from standing during a race.

Byrn now incorporates standing flats into some of his athletes’ workouts. He’ll have them stand and do an Olympic-distance effort to load the legs, then recover in time trial position at a steady or moderately-hard effort while working the heart rate down. “One of the things you need for time trialing is the ability to crank it up and recover, like when you’re riding over rollers,” Byrn says.

Try it:

3×15 minutes steady, with the middle 5 minutes standing at threshold effort

OR

4×9 minutes moderately-hard, with the middle 3 minutes standing at threshold effort, with 1 min easy recovery between each segment

RELATED: Mix Up Your Cycling Efforts To Become A Better Rider

Follow Triathlete on Twitter @Triathletemag for inspiration, new workout ideas, gear reviews from our editors and more.

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How To Fix, Treat And Prevent Runner’s Knee http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/training/how-to-fix-treat-and-prevent-runners-knee_116661 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/training/how-to-fix-treat-and-prevent-runners-knee_116661#comments Wed, 27 May 2015 12:15:36 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=116661

Photo: iStock

Building up your quads makes your knees more stable and less susceptible to injury.

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Photo: iStock


Building up your quads makes your knees more stable and less susceptible to injury.

Patellofemoral knee pain (aka “runner’s knee,” thanks to how prevalent it is among runners) is characterized by pain beneath the kneecap that’s worst after you finish an activity. It’s especially sore going up or down stairs, tends not to swell, and typically becomes most aggravated after about an hour of running, when your quads start to tire.

The patella (kneecap) has to withstand tremendous amounts of force, and the direction in which the patella moves is directly related to the forces that come from the quads.

Pain can come from several causes. One is an injury to the cartilage under the patella. Poor running or biking mechanics resulting from weak or tight muscles can contribute. Poorly conditioned glutes, core muscles, hips and quads can lead to pelvic instability, which can affect the knees. I see this condition in more women than men because of what is called the Q angle or the knock-kneed angle, which is caused by their wider hips and can result in overpronation (when the foot falls inward).

Fix It

Employ dynamic rest. As you work to rehab the injury, stay fit with vigorous upper-body work, plus pool running and/or biking if you can do so without knee pain. Meanwhile …

Strengthen your knees, quads and hips. Weak or inflexible quads are a particular source of knee pain, but upping your strength and flexibility throughout these three areas will help both ease the pain and improve your form once you return to your normal training. Plyometric lower-body exercises can help with strength and flexibility, so add multidirectional lunges, planks, skater plyos, squats and squat jumps to your workout.

Work on body mechanics. Poor running form can bring on this condition. A good way to see what your form looks like is to have a friend record you running toward a video camera or camera phone. You may see things you never realized you were doing. Do your knees fall inward? Do your feet roll inward or outward? Increasing your strength and flexibility can help your mechanics, but you may have to concentrate on proper form or seek out a coach to help you retrain yourself.

Prevent It

Runner’s knee is only sometimes caused by a literal knee problem. More likely, muscle imbalances, tightness, or bad conditioning in the quads and hips is the issue. The stretches and exercises above all target your quads and hips and can be added to any workout.

Training Tip
If you shorten your stride and raise your footstrike rate, you’ll take a lot of stress off your knees. Count the number of footstrikes of either the left or right foot over 1 minute as you run. A good number is 85 to 90 footstrikes per minute on one foot.

RELATED: Increase Your Running Cadence To Prevent Knee Injuries

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Sprint-Distance WTS London Set For Sunday http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/news/sprint-distance-wts-london-set-for-sunday_116812 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/news/sprint-distance-wts-london-set-for-sunday_116812#comments Tue, 26 May 2015 20:36:48 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=116812

Gwen Jorgensen will look to defend her London title. Photo: Janos Schmidt/Triathlon.org

London this weekend marks the sixth race and start to the European leg in the 2015 ITU World Triathlon Series.

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Gwen Jorgensen will look to defend her London title. Photo: Janos Schmidt/Triathlon.org

London this weekend marks the sixth race and start to the European leg in the 2015 ITU World Triathlon Series. Serving as the host city for the second sprint-distance race of the season for the elites, the Great Britain capital will also see the likes of Paratriathlon across multiple sport classes.

While Gwen Jorgensen (USA) tops the start list in the hopes of continuing on in her nine-time undefeated winning streak, London may bring her toughest competition yet. A star-studded women’s race will also feature compatriot Katie Zaferes, Great Britain’s own Non Stanford and Vicky Holland and New Zealand’s Andrea Hewitt. In the men’s race, brothers Alistair and Jonathan Brownlee (GBR) will face off head-to-head for the first time this season and with Javier Gomez (ESP) taking a break from the WTS, fellow Spaniard Mario Mola will be sporting the No. 1 in an attempt to claim another London gold as he did in a last-minute sprint finish last year.

Read the complete women’s preview.

Read the complete men’s preview.

Follow the race

Follow all the events live at triathlonlive.tv and on Twitter at @triathlonlive.

Men
Sunday, May 31
7:05 a.m. PDT/10:05 a.m. PDT

Women
Sunday, May 31
8:45 a.m. PDT/11:45 a.m. PDT

RELATED: Jorgensen, Groff Go One, Two In London

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One-Hour Workout: Backwards Hill Repeats http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/training/one-hour-workout-backwards-hill-repeats_116789 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/training/one-hour-workout-backwards-hill-repeats_116789#comments Tue, 26 May 2015 20:02:45 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=116789

Photo: Shutterstock.com

This week's session is unusual—running backwards, uphill!—and incredibly challenging.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

Every Tuesday we’ll feature a different coach’s workout you can complete in 60 minutes (or less!).

This week’s run workout comes from Kenley Ferrara Potts, a running coach in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. She was previously the run coach for the Brooklyn Triathlon Club in New York and now serves as the track coach for the Special Olympics Orange County. Potts says she loves this workout because it is unusual—running backwards, uphill!—and incredibly challenging, but it helps to reduce the risk of injury to the knees while incorporating speedwork.

RELATED: Hill Repeats You’re Not Sick Of

One-Hour Workout: Backwards Hill Repeats

Warm-up
5 mins of foam rolling
1 mile easy jog
10 mins of dynamic stretching (check out our favorite pre-run warmup here)

Main Set
- Find a challenging hill warm up to the bottom. Face backwards up the hill. Set your watch for 30 minutes, and press the start button.
– For your first repeat, maintain a slower pace to get the feel for running in the opposite direction.
– For recovery, walk backwards to the bottom of the hill in order to continue to keep the pressure off of your knees (walk slowly for safety).
– For the remaining hill repeats, try to maintain a slightly faster pace as you run uphill facing backwards—it’s easy to slow down as you approach the top of the hill but fight that urge and maintain your pace.
– When your watch hits 30 minutes, stop and cool down.

Cool-down
5 mins of stretching

More one-hour workouts.

 

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70.3 Worlds Return To U.S. In 2017, 3 Finalists Announced http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/news/70-3-worlds-return-to-u-s-in-2017-3-finalists-announced_116787 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/news/70-3-worlds-return-to-u-s-in-2017-3-finalists-announced_116787#comments Tue, 26 May 2015 19:37:27 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=116787

St. George currently hosts the Ironman 70.3 North American Championships. Photo: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image

Ironman today announced that the 2017 Ironman 70.3 world Championship will take place in the United States. Three cities, all of which

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St. George currently hosts the Ironman 70.3 North American Championships. Photo: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image

Ironman today announced that the 2017 Ironman 70.3 world Championship will take place in the United States. Three cities, all of which currently host Ironman or 70.3 events, have need named as the finalists to host the event. Chattanooga (Tennessee), Lake Placid (New York) and St. George (Utah) will be vying for the opportunity to host what will, for the first time, be a two-day event – with the professional women and age-group women racing on one day and the professional men and age-group men racing on the other.

“With the global explosion of Ironman 70.3 races, we expect approximately 4,500 athletes from around the world to qualify for the 2017 Ironman 70.3 World Championship, which is too many for a single day of racing,” said Andrew Messick, Chief Executive Officer of Ironman in the press release. “We are focused on providing more opportunities for women to race with us globally and, after consulting with members of our Women For Tri Board, felt that having a separate race for female professional and age group athletes would be a strong step forward for our sport.”

The Ironman 70.3 World Championship began an annual global rotation in 2014 in Mont-Tremblant, Quebec, Canada after being hosted by Clearwater, Fla. from 2006 to 2010 and in Henderson, Nev. from 2011 to 2013. This August, the event will be held in Europe for the first time, in Zell am See-Kaprun, SalzburgerLand, Austria. The 2016 race shifts to the Southern Hemisphere for the first time, in Queensland, Australia’s Sunshine Coast.

“The rotation of the Ironman 70.3 World Championship has elevated the race and allowed athletes from all over the world to experience a World Championship event at fantastic locations,” added Messick. “The finalists for the 2017 championship are all tremendous hosts to Ironman races and provide courses well suited for an event of this caliber. These cities also provide our athletes and their families world-class hospitality and endless scenic and entertainment options.”

Read the complete release and learn more about the finalists at Ironman.com.

RELATED PHOTOS: 2015 Ironman 70.3 St. George

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What Happens At The Back Of The Pack? http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/features/what-happens-at-the-back-of-the-pack_116769 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/features/what-happens-at-the-back-of-the-pack_116769#comments Tue, 26 May 2015 16:55:35 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=116769

An athlete finishes 4 seconds after the cutoff at the 2011 Ironman World Championship. Photo: Nils Nilsen

Ironman and Challenge Family explain cutoff times, removing slower athletes from the course.

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An athlete finishes 4 seconds after the cutoff at the 2011 Ironman World Championship. Photo: Nils Nilsen

Ironman and Challenge Family explain cutoff times, removing slower athletes from the course.

During 2014 Ironman Arizona, Larissa Lewis knew her odds of finishing before the 17-hour cutoff were slim. Still, she made her way down the dark sidewalks of Tempe.

“I felt horribly nauseous, my legs were finished working, my brain was completely fried, and boy, did I want to finish. But I never wanted to quit,” recalls Lewis of bringing up the back of the pack, “I didn’t care if the gates were shut and the lights were off once I got there. I was going to run down the dark sidewalk until my watch hit 26.2.”

Lewis was shocked to round the final corner and still hear Mike Reilly’s voice. Though she crossed the finish line two minutes past the cutoff time and is not documented as an official finisher in Ironman records, Lewis counts Arizona as the most memorable of her eight Ironman races.

“I was floored by what was in front of me. I imagined the only noise I would hear at the finish was my watch’s alert that I had reached 26.2. Instead, there was a squadron of cheering volunteers, the voice of my boyfriend rising above the crowd, flashbulbs bursting and the wonderful Meredith Kessler [who won the women’s professional race earlier that day] walking towards me with a beautiful medal.”

Lewis’ story epitomizes the glory of the “final finisher” of athletes tackling 140.6 miles of swim, bike and run. Many spectators at such events stay until midnight to cheer on athletes who have been in constant forward motion for over 16 hours.

But for every midnight finisher, there are dozens more who never get to experience the same glory. Cutoff times loom ominously over the back of the pack at every race, and race directors frequently need to make judgment calls on removing athletes who struggle to finish an event in time.

Cutoff times can vary from race to race, but iron-distance athletes are usually allowed around 2 hours and 15 minutes from the starting gun to complete the swim; between 8 and 10 hours from the starting gun to complete the bike; and 16 to 17 hours after race start to cross the finish line. Along the way, there may be intermediate cutoffsor example, failing to reach the halfway point of the run by a certain time might result in removal from the course.

These deadlines are important from both logistical and safety standpoints, as city officials usually allow races to close down roads for a certain amount of time. Once the barriers are removed, athletes still on the course are subject to unsafe road conditions without traffic management. Cutoffs are also in place to ensure athletes are not on the course without access to aid stations (a critical element of any athletic feat, much less one in excess of 16 hours) and emergency medical support.

However, these times are not set in stone. Race officials are given authority to use their best judgment in determining an athlete’s ability to make up time in the next discipline. Those within minutes of a cutoff time, like Lewis, are usually allowed to continue on.

“We do not believe in shattering a person’s dreams for the sake of 10 seconds, or even 10 minutes, says Victoria Murray-Orr of Challenge Family. “If someone is a few minutes over the cutoff time and they are in good physical and mental health, they will be allowed to continue. We take the viewpoint they have trained for a year for this and it is our job to help them achieve their dreams. They might be a terrible biker, but a fast runner. They might swim like a stone, but ride like the wind. All this information is assessed on a case-by-case basis and if they are not any danger to themselves, then we will cheer them on to the finish.”

Still, many athletes are removed from the course at every event. Rough water can lead to a high athlete removal rate in the swim portion of a race, while harsh weather conditions often contribute to a high number of athletes failing to get within cutoff times on the bike and run.

“At all races there is a tail-end Charlie [a boat, van or truck following the last racer in each discipline],” says Murray-Orr. “Each athlete at the back of the field is carefully monitored and it becomes apparent quite early on who is going to struggle to make the bike cut-off. If they are miles off, then they are withdrawn from the race.”

Ironman also stations officials along the bike and run courses to enforce course cutoffs, says Phillip LaHaye, Vice President of North American Operations for Ironman.

“It’s one of the most difficult things we have to do,” says LaHaye. “We are there to try to get each and every athlete across the line and we want to help athletes to achieve their goals. We hate to see anyone’s day end shy of them reaching the finish.”

Both LaHaye and Murray-Orr say enforcing cutoff times requires both compassion and tact.

“One of the hardest things to do is tell someone something they don’t want to hear,” says LaHaye. “I don’t think there is any right way to do that aside from being caring and understanding.”

Murray-Orr agrees: “Telling the athlete is always done very tactfully and mindful of the disappointment the athlete will feel. In the case where we have to remove someone from the course, it is always in the interest of their safety and for the most part they realize that.”

Reactions from athletes range from sadness to anger to relief. Some become cross with the officialsalmost all swear to try again.

“It’s a hard thing to do and you can’t help but to feel for the athlete,” says LaHaye. “But I give them all the respect in the world for not giving up.”

“We see many of them come back, even more determined than before,” says Murray-Orr. “They come back with a better understanding of the distance and what is required and it’s always wonderful to welcome them across the finish line and share their celebrations with them.”

“Keep moving forward as long as you can,” advises Lewis, who plans to continue racing. “If, in the end, you have to make your own finish line and the only sounds are the watch-beep of 26.2you made it.”

RELATED PHOTOS: The Final Hour In Kona

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2015 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide: Bike Fueling Systems http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/gear-tech/2015-triathlete-buyers-guide-bike-fueling-systems-2_116772 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/gear-tech/2015-triathlete-buyers-guide-bike-fueling-systems-2_116772#comments Tue, 26 May 2015 14:51:18 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=116772

Six gear options for staying hydrated on the bike.

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9 Vegan Sports Nutrition Products http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/photos/9-vegan-sports-nutrition-products_116753 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/photos/9-vegan-sports-nutrition-products_116753#comments Tue, 26 May 2015 13:50:24 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=116753

Sports nutrition companies are catering to a growing population of plant-based athletes.

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Sports nutrition companies are catering to a growing population of plant-based athletes.

According to a 2014 Harris Interactive study, approximately 5 percent of the United States population (or 16 million Americans) are vegetarian, with half of those identifying as vegan. Additionally, 33 percent of the population, or over 100 million people, say they choose to eat more vegetarian and vegan meals than in years past.

As popularity of a plant-based diet soars, so do sports nutrition options for vegetarian and vegan athletes. In the past, vegan athletes found it challenging to find gels, bars, and chews devoid of animal products. Nether vegetarians or vegans eat meat or fish; however, vegans follow an exclusively plant-based lifestyle, choosing not to eat other animal products such as dairy, eggs, honey or ingredients derived from animal products (such as gelatin or certain amino acids).

Today, an abundance of plant-based options exist for athletes looking to reduce or eliminate their consumption of animal products. Some are new formulas of long-time favorites, while others have hit the market in recent years to cater to the growing field of no-meat athletes.

RELATED – Self (Re)Made Man: Rich Roll

RELATED: Triathlete’s Multisport Menu

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Video: Increase Hip Mobility With This Exercise http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/training/monday-minute-cradle-walk-2_48658 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/training/monday-minute-cradle-walk-2_48658#comments Tue, 26 May 2015 13:15:12 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=48658

This week we demonstrate the cradle walk, a great exercise that will increase hip mobility and help smooth out your running stride.

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This week we demonstrate the cradle walk, a great exercise that will increase hip mobility and help smooth out your running stride.

More 60-second strength training and injury prevention videos on Triathlete.com

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Triathlete’s Open-Water How-To Series http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/training/triathletes-open-water-series_100116 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/training/triathletes-open-water-series_100116#comments Mon, 25 May 2015 21:33:49 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=100116

Learn how to exit the swim, make efficient buoy turns, sight properly and do a proper dolphin dive with two-time Ironman winner Luke Bell.

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Photos: 2015 Challenge Rimini http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/news/photos-2015-challenge-rimini_116632 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/news/photos-2015-challenge-rimini_116632#comments Mon, 25 May 2015 14:35:22 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=116632

Filip Ospaly and Kaisa Lehtonen were crowned the ETU European Half Distance Triathlon champions.

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Filip Ospaly (CZE) and Kaisa Lehtonen (FIN) were crowned the ETU European Half Distance Triathlon champions Sunday at Challenge Rimini on Italy’s Adriatic Coast.

Read the recap from Challenge Family below:
After days of rain, athletes welcomed clear conditions with a field of more than 1,600 ready to take on the spectacular course.

After exiting in the swim in sixth place, Ospaly headed out on the bike in the front group, led by Molinari with a chase group of Alberto Alessandroni (ITA) and Jonathan Ciavatella (ITA) just two minutes behind. By the halfway point, Molinari and Ceccarelli broke away, putting 20 seconds into Ospaly and a more comfortable 3:40 ahead of the chase group which now also included former European Champion Ritchie Nicholls (GBR). Coming into T2, Ospaly had dropped to 1:40 behind the leaders. However, the Challenge Rimini course with its flat 21km run was the perfect battleground for the strong runner and Ospaly stormed home in 4:06:14 to become European Champion, ahead of Molinari who finished in 4:07:23 and Bart Aernouts (BEL) who rounded off the podium in 4:08:09 after posting the fastest run split of the day of 1:13:54.

In the women’s race, Margie Santamaria (ITA) was first out of the water, 20 seconds ahead of Vanessa Raw (GBR) and two minutes ahead of Lehtonen, who was down in sixth place. By 30 km on the bike the situation had changed dramatically. Lehtonen had taken the lead together with Potuckova (CZE) and Raw. She continued to extend this lead, arriving at T2 six minutes ahead of Raw and Santimaria, a lead she managed to maintain, taking the win and the European Championship title in 4:41:14. However, the run of the day went to Dossena who ran up from ninth off the bike to take second place in 4:46:39, posting a 1:19:02 run split. Raw held onto third, finishing in 4:51:07.

Complete results.

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Degasperi, Riesler Victorious At Ironman Lanzarote http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/news/degasperi-riesler-victorious-at-ironman-lanzarote_116630 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/news/degasperi-riesler-victorious-at-ironman-lanzarote_116630#comments Sat, 23 May 2015 22:29:32 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=116630

Italy's Alessandro Degasperi and Germany's Diana Riesler claimed the victories at one of the toughest long-course triathlons on the planet.

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Italy’s Alessandro Degasperi and Germany’s Diana Riesler claimed the victories at one of the toughest long-course triathlons on the planet today in the Canary Islands.

Degasperi took the Ironman Lanzarote win in 8:56:49 with a 51:10 swim, a 5:12:12 bike and a 2:47:15 marathon. Germany’s Christian Kramer was second in 8:59:31, with Switzerland’s Mauro Baertsch getting third at 9:04:46.

Riesler dominated the women’s race, thanks in large part to a stellar 5:37:11 bike split. She book-ended that cycling effort with a 55:40 swim and a 3:16:20 marathon, giving her the 9:56:04 win. Austria’s Michi Herlbauer got the runner-up spot in 10:13:50. Great Britain’s Caroline Livesey rounded out the podium in 10:31:57.

Ironman Lanzarote
Lanzarote, Canary Islands, Spain – May 23, 2015
2.4-mile swim, 112-mile bike, 26.2-mile run

Men
1. Alessandro Degasperi (ITA) 8:56:50
2. Christian Kramer (GER) 8:59:31
3. Mauro Baertsch (SUI) 9:04:46
4. Miquel Blanchart Tintó (ESP) 9:10:26
5. Bert Jammaer (BEL) 9:12:06

Women
1. Diana Riesler (GER) 9:56:04
2. Michi Herlbauer (AUT) 10:13:50
3. Caroline Livesey (GBR) 10:31:57
4. Shiao-Yu Li (TPE) 10:33:43
5. Verena Walter (GER) 10:44:41

Complete results.

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Swim Healthy: Avoid These 4 Annoying Pool Issues http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/training/swim-healthy_28361 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/training/swim-healthy_28361#comments Fri, 22 May 2015 19:15:54 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=28361

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Chlorine kills a lot of bad stuff, but frequent swim training can still pose some pesky health concerns.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

Chlorine kills a lot of bad stuff, but frequent swim training can still pose some pesky health concerns. Don’t let one of these issues get in the way of your next swim session.

Swimmer’s ear

Water left lingering in your ear after swimming could lead to an infection in the outer canal.

Prevent it: Swim with earplugs and rinse out ears with a product such as Swim-Ear ($5.81, Amazon.com) that kills germs and evaporates water.

Treat it: There are lots of quirky home remedies—from laying your head on a sock filled with salt to rinsing your ear with garlic oil—but the quickest relief is prescription drops from a doctor.

RELATED: 5 Steps To Prevent Ear Infections

Hair damage

Pool chemicals can be harsh on your locks, making them more susceptible to breakage.

Prevent it: Wet your hair before you get in the pool, and wear a swim cap. Your hair is less likely to absorb chlorine if it’s already wet.

Treat it: Wash your hair post-swim with a shampoo/conditioner with chlorine-removal properties, such as UltraSwim ($12.78, Amazon.com) or TriSwim ($13.75, Shop.triswimbeauty.com).

RELATED: Swim-Specific Shampoos

Swimming pool rash

Chlorine can irritate skin and make it dry, itchy and, in some cases, turn into a rash.

Prevent it: Rinse off with warm water and antibacterial soap before you enter and immediately after you exit the pool. DermaSwim ($11.99, Dermaswimpro.com) is a pre-swimming lotion that can help block chlorine’s negative effects.

Treat it: If it worsens, take a bath with baking soda, then rub the affected areas with calamine lotion.

RELATED: A Physiological View Of What The Human Body Goes Through In An Ironman

Irritated eyes

If there’s a chemical imbalance in the pool—either too little or too much chlorine—you could wind up with red, irritated eyes.

Prevent it: Wear goggles, especially if you wear contact lenses. After swimming, flush your eyes with an over-the-counter saline such as Artificial Tears ($5.12, Amazon.com).

Treat it: If eyes get really inflamed or progress into chemical conjunctivitis (aka pool-induced pink eye), head to the doctor.

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What’s In My Swim Bag? With Mirinda Carfrae http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/gear-tech/whats-in-my-swim-bag-with-mirinda-carfrae_116619 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/gear-tech/whats-in-my-swim-bag-with-mirinda-carfrae_116619#comments Fri, 22 May 2015 17:50:33 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=116619

Three-time Ironman world champion Mirinda Carfrae (AUS) shares the tools she takes to every swim workout.

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Three-time Ironman world champion Mirinda Carfrae (AUS) shares the tools she takes to every swim workout.

RELATED: 7 Swim Tools For Triathletes

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Post-Workout Refueling: Now Or Later? http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/nutrition/post-workout-refueling-now-later_98926 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/nutrition/post-workout-refueling-now-later_98926#comments Fri, 22 May 2015 17:00:30 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=98926

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How disobeying a common rule of nutrient timing can help you reach your race weight.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

How disobeying a common rule of nutrient timing can help you reach your race weight.

If you’re having trouble losing fat and getting down to your optimal “race weight” this season, then you’re not alone. Among the endurance athletes I work with (both recreational age-groupers and elite-level athletes), one of the most difficult balancing acts is to solve the conflict between consuming more calories to completely fuel your muscles and improve/maintain performance and eating less to induce an energy deficit and encourage fat/weight loss. Go too far toward “fueling” and you don’t lose weight and go too far toward “cutting” and your performance suffers. So, how do you find the right balance point between fueling enough and not enough (or too much)?

Much has been made over the past few years about the importance of nutrient timing—which most of the time is interpreted as fueling immediately (or at least as soon as possible) following a bout of training. The general idea here is that your body is better able to replenish muscle and liver glycogen stores if you consume a blend of carbs/protein as soon as possible following exercise (for a variety of metabolic reasons including blood flow, enzyme activity, etc). True enough—but do you really need to be doing that? If your main objective is to fully restore glycogen levels for another high-intensity workout later in the day or the following day, then maybe you do need to fuel right away. If, however, you’re like most non-professional endurance athletes, and your main objective is to maximize weight/fat loss (to enhance performance later in the season), then the answer might be that you should not be fueling immediately after exercise.

RELATED: Eating For Recovery

This recommendation goes against a great deal of what many age-groupers hold as common knowledge. You’ve been taught to slurp a carb gel before, sip a carb beverage during, and chug a carb/protein shake after your workouts. In doing so, you’re certainly enhancing your replenishment of glycogen—but you’re also reducing your body’s ability to burn fat and your ability to achieve your optimal race weight. In metabolism research, there is a saying that “fat burns in the flame of carbohydrate”—meaning, optimal fat metabolism occurs when some carbs are being metabolized (certain breakdown products of carbohydrate metabolism are needed as cofactors for cellular fat metabolism). The problem is that the constant supply of carbs before/during and especially after training reduces insulin sensitivity and reduces our ability to use fat for fuel and thus our ability to lose body fat. When your glycogen stores are stuffed full, as they are when you’re constantly fueling before/during/after training, there is nowhere left to store more glucose, so we burn it in preference to fat. If you can’t burn fat, you can’t lose fat.

A useful approach for many endurance athletes who are trying to lose those last few pounds to get them to their race weight is to simply stop eating after their workouts, because doing so will improve insulin sensitivity and enhance fat-burning and weight loss. If you’re a bodybuilder or a Tour de France rider or have aspirations of finishing on the podium at the Ironman World Championship, then you’re probably training hard enough and often enough (at least twice daily) that you’re already at your optimal body fat level and you can (and should) eat (and eat a lot) immediately after every workout.

RELATED: Whole Foods For Recovery

But even very good and highly competitive endurance athletes probably do not need to fuel immediately after their workouts—unless they’re already at your optimal race weight and have no need to shed any body fat. Instead, save the immediate post-workout fueling for after your most epic workouts (when you really need to maximize your glycogen replenishment) and instead allow your body to use that post-exercise period to benefit from enhanced fat metabolism. Eating later (2 or 3 hours later at your next meal) will still result in replenished glycogen stores—at least to a level that is enough to adequately support the typical training regimens for most recreational endurance athletes—and you’ll notice a gradual and progressive drop in body fat (with the same training regimen) that may have been eluding you previously.

***

About The Author:

Dr. Shawn Talbott is an avid iron-distance triathlete and ultrarunner. He holds a MS in exercise science and a PhD in nutritional biochemistry and develops products and programs for endurance athletes in a variety of sports.

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Quick Set Friday: Frogs And 3/2/1/0 Breaths http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/training/frogs-and-3210-breaths-swim-workout-for-triathletes_76462 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/training/frogs-and-3210-breaths-swim-workout-for-triathletes_76462#comments Fri, 22 May 2015 13:14:47 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=76462

Photo: Shutterstock.com

We’ll feature a workout every Friday so you have new ideas to take to the pool.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

Triathlete contributor and swimming all-star Sara McLarty has a blog with more than 500 creative workouts used in her Masters swim program in Clermont, Fla. We’ll feature a workout every Friday so you have new ideas to take to the pool. On her blog (Mastersswimworkoutsbysaramclarty.blogspot.com), you can pick a Monday set for a long distance focus, a Wednesday set for sprint training, or Friday for creative open water skills.

A:
200 swim/100 drill/200 pull/100 IM drill
20×50 on :50 (5 as Catch-up w/stick, 5 as build, repeat)
Timed 15-minute swim (Record how many laps completed)
20×25 on :30 (3 breaths/2 breaths/1 breaths/0 breaths by 25)
2×400 pull w/ 30 sec rest (200 build/200 strong)
200 cool-down (50 kick/50 frog/100 swim)
*4100 Total*

RELATED: Conquer Your Swim Weakness

B:
200 swim/100 drill/200 pull/100 drill
16×50 on :60 (4 as Catch-up w/stick, 4 as build, repeat)
Timed 15-minute swim (Record how many laps completed)
20×25 on :40 (3 breaths/2 breaths/1 breaths/0 breaths by 25)
400 pull w/ 30 sec rest (200 build/200 strong)
200 cool-down (50 kick/50 frog/100 swim)
*3500 Total*

RELATED – Ask Coach Sara: Making The Most Of Open-Water Swims

C:
200 swim/100 drill/200 pull/100 drill
8×50 w/ 15 sec rest (4 as Catch-up w/ stick, 4 as build)
Timed 15-minute swim (Record how many laps completed)
12×25 w/ 15 sec rest (3 breaths/2 breaths/1 breaths/0 breaths by 25)
300 pull w/ 30 sec rest (200 build/200 strong)
200 cool-down (50 kick/50 frog/100 swim)
*2400 Total*

Frog:
Sit on a kick-board between your legs, and use your arms to move forward. Use a breaststroke pulling motion.This is a great social activity because you can chat with your lane mates as you move down the pool. You will feel the muscles in your forearms and upper back getting a good workout!

Catch-up w/ stick:
Use a sideways kickboard or a stick to perform the drill above. Keep your hands shoulder-width apart and exchange the board or stick from hand-to-hand between each stroke.

More swim workouts from Sara McLarty.

Follow Triathlete on Twitter @Triathletemag for inspiration, new workout ideas, gear reviews from our editors and more.

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Your Next Family Racecation: Jekyll Island’s Turtle Crawl Triathlon http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/features/your-next-family-racecation-jekyll-islands-turtle-crawl-triathlon_116610 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/features/your-next-family-racecation-jekyll-islands-turtle-crawl-triathlon_116610#comments Fri, 22 May 2015 00:33:59 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=116610

If you want to race and give your family that low-key R&R vacation they deserve afterwards, put this on your calendar for next year.

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2015 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide: Swim Accessories http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/gear-tech/2015-triathlete-buyers-guide-swim-accessories-2_116590 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/gear-tech/2015-triathlete-buyers-guide-swim-accessories-2_116590#comments Thu, 21 May 2015 23:20:00 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=116590

Take your swimming to the next level with these Triathlete editor picks for accessories.

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Preparing For A Race In An Unfamiliar Climate http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/nutrition/preparing-for-a-race-in-an-unfamiliar-climate_116527 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/nutrition/preparing-for-a-race-in-an-unfamiliar-climate_116527#comments Thu, 21 May 2015 20:58:35 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=116527

Photo: Thierry Deketelaere / Endurapix

How do you adapt your nutrition plan for a race in a climate that's different than where you train? Here’s what you need to know.

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Photo: Thierry Deketelaere / Endurapix

How do you adapt your nutrition plan for a race in a climate that’s different than where you train? Here’s what you need to know. 

Those of us triathletes who are not fortunate enough to live in a year-round warm-weather climate are relegated to indoor cycling and bundled-up running in frigid temps for several months each winter. Many of us select early-season races by location—a great excuse to travel somewhere warm in May. Then, as race day approaches, we realize our bodies will not be acclimated to the heat, and that our nutritional needs will be very different and intake must be adjusted. But how?

I have done early-season warmer races, including Ironman 70.3 St. Croix and Wildflower Long Course. I remember how hot I felt in comparison to my home training climate at that time of year. When traveling from a cold to warm climate, the sudden temperature increase will predispose your body to overheating sooner and cause your sweat rate to increase as your body works to keep itself cool. Unless you have the luxury of a full two-week acclimatization period to train in the race climate before race day (wouldn’t that be great?), you will need to adjust your nutritional plan, goal pace and expectations, as cooling the body will divert needed blood and oxygen from both your muscles and gut (read: slowed performance and decreased digestion).

To feel your best in a hot environment, you will need to increase and pay close attention to your intake of both fluids and electrolytes. Plan your needed fluid intake based on hot-weather sweat tests from last year. If you don’t have that information, know that sweat rates vary widely, but the average endurance athlete will sweat 24–32 ounces per hour, and your winter sweat rate can double during an acclimation period, so do not rely on what you were drinking during cold-weather training. You will also need additional electrolytes as your body works to keep itself cool. I recommend using electrolyte tabs in addition to your sports drink to ensure you meet those needs. Finally, your max calorie absorption rate will be somewhat decreased, again due to blood diverted to the skin for cooling, so you’ll want to slightly decrease your calorie intake goal, and choose mostly sports drinks for calories and extra fluid. Save the solid foods for cold-weather training and racing, or races later in the season when you are acclimated to the heat and able to better absorb calories. Two final tips: Wear a visor to keep the sun off your face while allowing your head to cool, and dump cool water over your head during the race.

If you live in a warm climate and plan to race in a colder climate (as my California triathlete friends occasionally do with East Coast-based me), the opposite is true. Your calorie needs will be the same in the cold as they were in the heat, but you will need less total fluids and electrolytes due to your lower sweat rate. In this case, be conscious of taking in adequate calories from gels or solids as you will be inclined to drink less total fluids. The caveat here is that you warm-weather folks need to not overdress. You can easily tell the warm-weather native running in New York in May—they are wearing all their “winter” gear while we natives are thrilled to be running in shorts in the pleasurable 50-degree “heat.” Overdressing will cause you to overheat and sweat more—increasing your needs for both fluids and electrolytes, but your brain may still tell you, “It’s cold here,” and you will then tend to overheat, under-hydrate and can become dehydrated. So, dress in layers you can remove as you start to sweat and carry solids to ensure adequate calories for longer races.

RELATED: How To Train And Race In The Heat

Cold climate to warm race

– In addition to your sports drink, use electrolyte tabs to keep body cool
– Slightly decrease calorie intake and get most calories from fluids
– Wear a visor (not a hat)
– Dump water over head during race

RELATED – True Or False: Winter Running Burns More Calories

Warm climate to cool race

– Aim for the same amount of calories as in the cold
– Take on less total fluids and electrolytes than during training
– Carry solid foods
– Dress in layers

Lauren Antonucci, R.D., is a board-certified specialist in sports dietetics, three-time Ironman finisher and the founding director of Nutrition Energy in New York City.

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Recipe Of The Week: Summer Couscous Salad http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/nutrition/recipe-of-the-week-summer-couscous-salad_116524 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/05/nutrition/recipe-of-the-week-summer-couscous-salad_116524#comments Thu, 21 May 2015 20:47:52 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=116524

This colorful Israeli couscous salad is highlighted by fresh veggies, a bright pop of pomegranate seeds and a zesty basil-citrus dressing.

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With Memorial Day around the corner, it’s time to kick off of BBQ season. This colorful Israeli couscous salad is highlighted by crunchy fresh veggies, a bright pop of pomegranate seeds and a zesty basil-citrus dressing. Complement your grilling with this recipe at your next BBQ, or keep a large batch on hand for a quick weeknight side dish.

Ingredients

1 10-12 is box Israelie couscous*
1 cup red or tri-color quinoa, cooked
2 carrots, peeled and diced
1 yellow bell pepper, diced
1 1/2 cups sugar snap peas, diced
1/2 cup pomegranate seeds
1/4 red onion, sliced paper thin
2 oranges
2 lemons
6 large basil leaves, finely chopped
3 TBSP olive oil
1 tsp sea salt
1/2 tsp freshly cracked pepper
1/2 cup crumbled feta or goat cheese (optional)
* Traditional couscous, quinoa, farro, rice, pasta or any grain may be substituted.

RELATED – Fire Up The Grill: Beyond Hot Dogs And Burgers

Preparation

1. Zest and juice the oranges and lemons into a large bowl. Whisk in the olive oil, salt and pepper. Gently stir in the basil.
2. Add the veggies and pomegranate seeds to the bowl with the dressing and let marinate while cooking the couscous.
3. In a deep pan, over medium-high heat, toast the couscous with an extra tablespoon olive oil and pinch of salt. Stir with a wooden spoon consistently for 2 minutes, until all the pearls are slightly golden.
4. Add the couscous with the amount of water recommended in the cooking instructions on the box.
5. Cook until al dente, according to the instructions on the box.
6. Once cooked, add to the bowl with the veggies and dressing. Add the quinoa and toss until well combined.
7. Serve warm or chill in the fridge. If adding cheese, recommended to add after chilled.

More recipes from Jessica Cerra.

Jessica Cerra is the owner of Fit Food by Jess, a private chef and catering company in Encinitas, Calif., and the co-founder of Harmony Bar. A former professional XTERRA triathlete, Cerra now races for Twenty16 Women’s Professional Cycling Team.

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