Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com Triathlon Training, Gear, Nutrition, Photos, Race Results & Calendars Fri, 22 Aug 2014 21:04:53 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.5.2 Tri Bike Close-Up: Felt IA FRD LTD http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/photos/tri-bike-close-felt-ia-frd-ltd_104528 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/photos/tri-bike-close-felt-ia-frd-ltd_104528#comments Fri, 22 Aug 2014 20:36:39 +0000 Evan Rudd http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=104528

Felt decided to spurn road racers to build the IA FRD with ultra-deep tubes to save wind drag and add a small, integrated storage box.

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Photos: John David Becker

$14,000, Feltbicycles.com

The number of bikes built only for triathlon is growing. Felt decided to spurn road racers to build the IA FRD with ultra-deep tubes to save wind drag and add a small, integrated storage box. Other clever features such as a novel seatpost clamp and cleanly integrated fork distinguish this bike at the very top level of technology. Combining the best technology with realistic fit is another of the IA’s strengths. Frame fit characteristics are also decidedly friendly for typical multisport positions. The bike is tall enough to support most tri fits without relying on a tower of spacers. One of the very best performing and most functional component kits possible—the electronic Dura-Ace set—bolsters this noteworthy frame. To top it off, the Mavic CXR wheels have proven to be among the very fastest.

RELATED – 2014 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide: Triathlon Bikes

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Gardening For Triathletes http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/nutrition/gardening-for-triathletes_26406 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/nutrition/gardening-for-triathletes_26406#comments Fri, 22 Aug 2014 19:00:55 +0000 Adam Kelinson http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=26406

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Adam Kelinson explains why growing your own food can be one of the best ways to achieve an ideal diet.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

Author Adam Kelinson explains why growing your own food can be one of the best ways to achieve an ideal diet.

One of the first things I say to my clients before redefining their relationship with food is: “Nutritional success requires personal participation and responsibility.” There are many aspects to this, but nothing exemplifies it better than growing some of your own food. For most, this is a far-reaching a concept amid a lifestyle that’s already challenged to find the time to shop, cook and eat healthy. However, gardening comes in all forms, and there’s endless information available that can make it a low-maintenance, enriching experience.

Consider this: If the front-end work of gardening took you as much time as two trips to the market, wouldn’t it be easier to have instant access to fresh produce than to always have to drive to buy it? Here are a few gardening tips to get you started:

- Get in the (right) zone
Spring is planting season, but before you can put seed to soil “you need to know what hardiness zone you live in,” says Katie Green, the garden manager at Garden of Eve Organic Farm and Market in Riverhead, N.Y. You can find your local zone by typing your zip code into the calculator at Garden.org/zipzone. This will give you the time of the year, post-frost, when it is safe to plant.

- Keep it simple
Grow things you like to eat that are also simple and reliable, suggests Peter Garnham, the master gardener at the EECO Farm in East Hampton, N.Y. Green suggests items such as lettuce, Asian greens (bok choy and tatsoi), radishes, herbs (parsley, basil, chives) and arugula. These are quick-growing, which means they are ready to harvest after a month, and can also be planted in pots.

- Prep properly
Preparing containers for planting is simple: All you need is a ratio of one-third compost to two-thirds potting soil. Avoid using soil from your backyard because it does not have the necessary aeration. Your local garden supply store will have the products and information to assist you. Prepackaged kits are simple and great for the whole family, such as those from Earthbox.com, which are organic and even self-watering. Purchasing seedlings is also an option with a similar, but not equivalent, diversity of plants to choose from. Green says this works best for plants such as tomatoes, which require extra care when started from the seed.

- Supervise your seeds
Once you’re done planting, it’s all about the management. The more love you give, the more love you get. Plants in containers require more watering, so Green suggests putting your plants in a location you pass frequently, and to “choose one day a week, written on your calendar, that you will water, fertilize and inspect your plants.” Eventually you won’t need the reminder.

The most important thing to do when growing your own food is to enjoy your product. Happy planting!

RELATED: Eat Healthy At Home, Even With A Hectic Schedule

*For recipes on how to use your garden food and seasonal tips on gardening, check out Adam Kelinson’s book “The Athlete’s Plate: Real Food for High Performance” and visit Organicperformance.com.

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How To Avoid Late-Race Fatigue http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/training/avoid-late-race-fatigue_104518 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/training/avoid-late-race-fatigue_104518#comments Fri, 22 Aug 2014 18:05:28 +0000 Mackenzie Lobby http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=104518

Photo: Janos Schmidt/Triathlon.org

The key is in better muscular endurance.

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Photo: Janos Schmidt/Triathlon.org


Want to avoid late-race run fatigue? The key is in better muscular endurance.

We’ve all been there. In the latter portion of a race, fatigue sets in, your form falls apart and your pace slows. While that efficient lope may have been effortless at the beginning of the running leg, a few miles in, it can start to feel difficult to even put one foot in front of the other. When your form begins to fail, your running economy—how efficiently your working muscles utilize oxygen to function at a specific pace—also takes a dive.

Research out of Northumbria University in England shed light on this link between running economy, fatigue and muscular endurance. Upon recruiting a group of runners, the researchers first tested their quad and hamstring muscular endurance strength. They then put them through two treadmill tests—one where they ran at a steady pace over a number of miles and the other during which they ran at VO2max pace for four minutes in the middle of the run.

Unsurprisingly, the participants’ running economy suffered a whole lot more in the second half of the run that included the high-intensity bout than the steady-state run. The researchers also found that their muscular endurance dictated how much running economy suffered. Those with higher muscular endurance maintained their running economy better than their weaker counterparts.

Mike Hamberger, a certified USA Track and Field coach and strength and conditioning specialist in Washington, D.C., explains this by saying that optimal muscular endurance allows proper form to be maintained throughout a long race or workout. “If form is correct, then there is less compensation happening with the mechanics,” he adds. “Less compensation means fewer unnecessary movements and less reliance on weaker muscles having to pick up the slack for the bigger muscles getting tired.”

RELATED: Heather Jackson’s Tips For A Strong Triathlon Run

This process, in turn, translates into less oxygen being required by the body to run at a given pace, which is where the boost in running economy comes. Rich Airey, a running and strength coach, and creator of RunningWOD.com, echoes this point, adding, “As you start to break down, the stronger the muscle fibers are, the longer you’ll be able to push. The key is to avoid breakdown in form.”

Put simply, it’s all about being strong enough to push back that point of fatigue as far as possible, especially in longer races. You can’t just strength train non-discriminately and get results, however. By focusing on the running muscles that do the most work, you’ll stave off that point of decreased running economy.

In particular, the muscles in the lower back, hips, hamstrings and glutes should be at the top of your list when it comes to strength work. “By strengthening these, you’ll also strengthen your core and improve posture,” Airey says. “All movement begins and ends with posture.”

Hamberger emphasizes the importance of the glutes since they work the hardest when a runner is maintaining good form. “Strong glutes allow the legs to move freely behind the runner during the recovery phase of the stride,” he explains. “Coupled with hip flexibility, this recovery action of the leg is what determines stride length, which, in turn, is what determines running speed.”

Click the tabs at the left for four exercises to improve muscular endurance.

RELATED: The Benefits Of A Strong Core

Come train (and race!) with us! We’re hosting the first ever Triathlete Magazine Training Camp Sept. 17-21 in San Diego, Calif. Learn more here.

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Transamerica Chicago Triathlon Set For This Weekend http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/news/transamerica-chicago-triathlon-set-weekend_104514 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/news/transamerica-chicago-triathlon-set-weekend_104514#comments Fri, 22 Aug 2014 17:19:14 +0000 Liz Hichens http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=104514

Photo: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image/@Compimagephoto

More than 9,000 athletes will compete at this weekend's Transamerica Chicago Triathlon.

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Photo: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image/@Compimagephoto

More than 9,000 athletes will compete at this weekend’s Transamerica Chicago Triathlon, which will feature a few significant course changes. In the elite race, Americans Ben Collins, Cameron Dye, Hunter Kemper, Sarah Haskins and Alicia Kaye highlight the start lists.

The Course

Previously known for its signature route through downtown Chicago, this year’s race will highlight a new single-loop International bike course. The route begins along Lake Shore Drive with scenic lakefront views, then heads to Lower Wacker Drive, the financial district, then the Lower Randolph Busway before turning around to head back to transition. Race directors decided to change the course to “provide athletes with the ultimate tour of Chicago, utilizing flat and fast roadways that are both well-known and not-so-familiar.”

A new swim start has also been adopted for the 2014 event. Elite athletes will enter the water first, followed by the International race participants then sprint athletes. The new single-loop bike course allows for more open space along Lake Shore Drive for finishing swimmers. (Read more about the changes here.)

The Pro Race

Professional triathletes will battle for the event’s $40,000 purse, with the top male and female taking home $8,500 each and valuable Life Time Series points. Chicago serves as the fifth of the six-race pro series, which will culminate at the championship race in Oceanside, Calif. on Oct 26.

Chicagoan Ben Collins is the favorite after wins at the Life Time Tri Minneapolis in July and the Panasonic New York City Triathlon earlier this month. His biggest competition will come from reigning Life Time Tri Series winner Cameron Dye. Other top male contenders include Jordan Jones (CAN), Hunter Kemper (USA) and Tim O’Donnell (USA).

On the women’s side, the favorites will be Alicia Kaye and Sarah Haskins. Kaye dominated last year’s Life Time Tri Series with Haskins on the sidelines after having a baby girl. Haskins came back with a vengeance, going undefeated during the first half of the season. She’s been battling injury over the last couple of months, so her condition will be a big question mark. Other top female pros include Lauren Barnett (USA), Lauren Brandon (USA), Sara McLarty (USA) and Jillian Petersen (USA).

RELATED PHOTOS: 2013 Life Time Tri Chicago

Men’s Start List
Chase Baraczek
Greg Bennett
Ben Collins
Brooks Cowan
Sam Douglas
Robert Duncan
Cameron Dye
Kevin Everett
Jon Fecik
Ryan Frederickson
Jordan Jones
Hunter Kemper
Jim Lubinski
William Martin
Andrew Mueller
Reeven Nathan
Andrew Nielsen
Timothy O’Donnell
Taylor Reid
Jake Rhyner
Dan Tigert
Jason West
Alex Willis
Matthew Wisthoff

Women’s Start List
Lauren Barnett
Lauren Brandon
Paola Caceres
Abby Geurink
Sarah Haskins
Bailey Hinz
Tanu Kaushik
Alicia Kaye
Samantha Kennedy
Mandy Mclane
Sara McLarty
Jillian Petersen
Nell Rojas
Molly Woodford

Life Time Kids Tri

In addition, Saturday’s Life Time Kids Tri will host the largest event in its history with more than 1,100 children ages 7-14 breaking into the sport of triathlon, building confidence and encouraging healthy competition in a fun, safe environment. Awards will go to the top three boys and top three girls in each age group. The family friendly event will take place at Montrose Avenue Beach, along with Saturday’s SuperSprint.

RELATED: Sarah Haskins Dominant In Return To Racing

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Quick Set Friday: Warm Up With Fins http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/training/quick-set-friday-warm-fins_104511 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/training/quick-set-friday-warm-fins_104511#comments Fri, 22 Aug 2014 16:45:40 +0000 Jené Shaw http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=104511

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Triathlete contributor and swimming all-star Sara McLarty shares another swim workout to try this weekend.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

Triathlete contributor and swimming all-star Sara McLarty has a blog with more than 500 creative workouts used in her Masters swim program in Clermont, Fla. We’ll feature a workout every Friday so you have new ideas to take to the pool. On her blog (Mastersswimworkoutsbysaramclarty.blogspot.com), you can pick a Monday set for a long distance focus, a Wednesday set for sprint training, or Friday for creative open water skills

A:
Warm up with fins: 200 swim/200 kick/200 swim
2x
[4x200 pull on 3:00 (3/5 breathing pattern by 50)
6x50 on :55 (25 kick/25 swim build)
6x75 on :60 (all strong)
6x25 on :40 (from the middle of the pool, vertical kick between intervals)]
4×100 cool-down with 15 sec rest (50 non-free/50 free)
=4400

RELATED – Ask Coach Sara: Battling Foot Cramps

B:
Warm up with fins: 200 swim/200 kick/200 swim
2x
[2x200 pull on 4:00 (3/5 breathing pattern by 50)
4x50 on 1:15 (25 kick/25 swim build)
6x75 on 1:30 (all strong)
6x25 on :45 (from the middle of the pool, vertical kick between intervals)]
4×100 cool-down with 15 sec rest (50 non-free/50 free)
=3400

RELATED – Ask Coach Sara: The Best Pool Sessions

C:
Warm up with fins: 200 swim/100 kick/200 swim
3×200 pull with 30 sec rest (3/5 breathing pattern by 50)
6×50 with 15 sec rest (25 kick/25 swim build)
6×75 with 20 sec rest (all strong)
6×25 on :45 (from the middle of the pool, vertical kick between intervals)
4×100 cool-down with 15 sec rest (50 non-free/50 free)
= 2400

More swim workouts from Sara McLarty.

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Vandals Leave Tacks At Steamboat Triathlon http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/news/vandals-leave-tacks-steamboat-triathlon_104507 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/news/vandals-leave-tacks-steamboat-triathlon_104507#comments Fri, 22 Aug 2014 13:00:29 +0000 Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=104507

Athletes competing at Sunday's Steamboat Triathlon received an abnormal amount of flats on a specific stretch of the race.

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Athletes competing at Sunday’s Steamboat Triathlon received an abnormal amount of flats on a specific stretch of the race.

The search is on for the vandals who are targeting cyclists after tacks blew out the tires of a group of triathletes over the weekend.

The crime happened Sunday morning along a stretch of road outside Steamboat Springs during the biking portion of the Steamboat Triathlon, which takes place around Lake Catamount.

Race organizers said they knew something was wrong when an unusually large number of competitors wound up with flat tires.

“All the sudden I see two flats, and I’m saying, ‘There’s something is going on,’ ” Dr. Jim McCreight said.

McCreight sponsored the triathlon and competed in it, and wound up with a flat.

“The case—what it came down to, were tacks. And in this case a number of tacks,” he said.

Read more: Denver.cbslocal.com

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Video: The Importance Of Active Recovery http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/training/video-the-importance-of-active-recovery_46617 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/training/video-the-importance-of-active-recovery_46617#comments Thu, 21 Aug 2014 22:00:48 +0000 Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=46617

While it's great to take complete rest after a hard workout, sometimes active recovery is a better choice.

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While it’s great to take complete rest after a hard workout, sometimes active recovery is a better choice. The trick is finding a balance between being active enough and going easy enough. Watch the video below as Sage Rountree explains the benefits of active recovery and how it can fit into your training schedule.

RELATED: Five Recovery Techniques For Triathletes

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Photos: 2014 Ironman Kalmar Sweden http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/photos/photos-2014-ironman-kalmar-sweden_104413 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/photos/photos-2014-ironman-kalmar-sweden_104413#comments Thu, 21 Aug 2014 20:20:13 +0000 Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=104413

Germany’s Horst Reichel and Great Britain's Leanda Cave took the Ironman wins in Kalmar, Sweden.

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Germany’s Horst Reichel earned the first Ironman victory of his career, while Great Britain’s Leanda Cave took the women’s win and validated her spot on the Ironman World Championship start line at today’s Ironman Kalmar race. Read the race recap.

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20 Must-Follow Triathlon Accounts On Twitter http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/photos/20-must-follow-triathlon-accounts-twitter_104440 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/photos/20-must-follow-triathlon-accounts-twitter_104440#comments Thu, 21 Aug 2014 20:17:52 +0000 Bethany Mavis http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=104440

Stay up to date with, be entertained or be inspired by these 20 triathlon-related accounts on Twitter.

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Stay up to date with, be entertained or be inspired by these 20 triathlon-related accounts on Twitter.

RELATED: Do’s And Dont’s Of Sharing Your Triathlon Pursuits On Social Media

RELATED – Confessions Of An Age-Grouper: #Riveting

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Cupcakes With Cal: Rachel Joyce http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/video/cupcakes-cal-rachel-joyce_104436 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/video/cupcakes-cal-rachel-joyce_104436#comments Thu, 21 Aug 2014 17:54:18 +0000 Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=104436

New Zealand pro and Ironman 70.3 champion Callum Millward interviews fellow pro athletes on his YouTube series "Cupcakes with Cal."

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New Zealand pro and Ironman 70.3 champion Callum Millward interviews fellow pro athletes on his YouTube series “Cupcakes with Cal.” This week he sits down with long-course pro Rachel Joyce.

RELATED: Rachel Joyce Ready To Roll

More “Cupcakes With Cal” videos.

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Recipe: Rustic Broccoli Salad With Tarragon Dressing http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/nutrition/recipe-rustic-broccoli-salad-tarragon-dressing_104408 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/nutrition/recipe-rustic-broccoli-salad-tarragon-dressing_104408#comments Thu, 21 Aug 2014 16:57:42 +0000 Jessica Cerra http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=104408

Steamed broccoli, summer tomatoes, crunchy radishes, salty olives, creamy avocado and tangy hearts of palm create a harmonious balance.

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This salad is loaded with all the goodies! Steamed broccoli, summer tomatoes, crunchy radishes, salty olives, creamy avocado and tangy hearts of palm create a harmonious balance on your plate. All dressed up with a fresh tarragon vinaigrette, you won’t have a problem getting your daily servings of veggies in.

Ingredients

Makes 4-6 servings
1 large head broccoli
1 large avocado
4 hearts of palm, sliced into coins
3 radishes, sliced
1 cup summer tomatoes, halved or diced
2/3 cup large, pitted black olives, halved
6 heaping cups spring mix, spinach, or seasonal greens
¼ cup olive oil
¼ cup fresh squeezed lemon juice
2 tablespoons freshly chopped tarragon
2 fresh basil leaves
1 teaspoon agave
1 teaspoon sea salt
½ teaspoon freshly cracked pepper

RELATED: Asparagus, Broccolini And Pesto Flatbread Recipe

Preparation

1. Cut the broccoli into florets and steam until slightly soft. Let cool and set aside.
2. Put the spring mix into a large bowl.
3. Cut the avocado in half, remove the pit and using a small knife, score both sides. Then use a spoon to scoop the chunks of avocado over the lettuce.
4. Add the hearts of palm, radish, tomatoes and broccoli (once cooled).
5. In a blender combine the olive oil, lemon juice, tarragon, basil, agave, salt and pepper for 30 seconds until smooth.
6. Conservatively toss the salad with some of the dressing. There will be dressing remaining to be stored in the fridge.

RELATED – Fire Up The Grill: Beyond Burgers And Hot Dogs

Want to try some of Jessica Cerra’s cooking in person? She’s the featured chef for our upcoming Triathlete Magazine Training Camp. Sign up here!

Jess Cerra is the owner of Fit Food by Jess, a private chef and catering company in Encinitas, Calif. Jess recently launched Harmony Bar, and all natural gluten-and soy free bar designed to tasted like a soft baked cookie. She is an ex-professional XTERRA triathlete and mountain biker, and current elite amateur road cyclist for the SPY GIANT RIDE p/b MRI Endurance team. Follow Jess’ recipes on her “Fit Food by Jess” Facebook page, as well as the “Harmony Bar” Facebook page. Also on twitter @fitfoodbyjess and @harmonybars.

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Challenge Bahrain Announces Early Pro Start List http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/news/challenge-bahrain-announces-early-pro-start-list_104403 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/news/challenge-bahrain-announces-early-pro-start-list_104403#comments Thu, 21 Aug 2014 16:04:34 +0000 Liz Hichens http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=104403

The entire Challenge Roth women's podium has committed to Bahrain. Photo: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image/@Compimagephoto

Challenge Bahrain today revealed the professionals that have signed on to compete at the Dec. 6 race.

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The entire Challenge Roth women's podium has committed to Bahrain. Photo: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image/@Compimagephoto

Challenge Bahrain today revealed the professionals that have signed on to compete at the Dec. 6 race, and the start list is one of the most impressive of the year over any distance. The half-distance race will feature a $500,000 prize purse and will welcome world champions, Olympic medalists and more well-known pros.

Ironman world champions Pete Jacobs (AUS), Mirinda Carfrae (AUS), Chris McCormack (AUS) and Leanda Cave (GBR) have all given the early commitment. Additionally, Ironman 70.3 world champions Sebastian Kienle (GER) and Michael Raelert (GER) will be competing. Short-course speed will also be on display with Olympic medalists Jan Frodeno (GER), Bevan Docherty (NZL), Lisa Norden (SWE) and Erin Densham (AUS) all adding their names to the start list.

“We are honored to host each and every professional triathlete to the Kingdom of Bahrain to participate in Challenge Bahrain, an event we are holding very dear in our hearts,” said Dr Saqer Al Khalifa, president of the Bahrain Triathlon Association, in the press release. “Having such a great lineup will most certainly bring us closer to our goals, to raise awareness of the importance and significance of having sports become an integral part of a person’s life in all global societies.”

“A field of this caliber is going to ensure Challenge Bahrain is one of the most memorable races of the year–and it’s open to everyone!” said Zibi Szlufcik, Challenge Family CEO. “Age groupers will race alongside the greatest and most inspirational athletes in our sport. Triathlon is the only sport on the planet where everyday people like you and me, regardless of ability, can share the course with the world’s best and Challenge Bahrain is the ultimate showcase of what makes this sport great along with its definition of quality leadership and warm welcome to all.”

The professional athletes confirmed to date for Challenge Bahrain are as follows:

Men – Pete Jacobs (AUS), Dirk Bockel (LUX), Sebastian Kienle (GER), Tim Berkel (AUS), Terenzo Bozzone (NZL), Timo Bracht (GER), Tyler Butterfield (USA), Frederik Croneborg (SWE), James Cunnama (RSA), Bevan Docherty (NZL), Tim Don (USA), Michael Dreitz (GER), Jan Frodeno (GER), Nils Frommhold (GER), Brad Kahlefeldt (AUS), Eneko Llanos (ESP), Chris McCormack (AUS), Luke McKenzie (AUS), Dylan McNeice (NZL), Tim O’Donnell (USA), Rasmus Petreaus (DEN), Michael Raelert (GER).

Women – Mirinda Carfrae (AUS), Rachel Joyce (GBR), Caroline Steffen (SUI), Nikki Butterfield (AUS), Leanda Cave (GBR), Erin Densham (AUS), Mary Beth Ellis (USA), Helle Frederikson (DEN), Lucy Gossage (GBR), Sarah Haskins (USA), Heather Jackson (USA), Rebekah Keat (AUS), Meredith Kessler (USA), Carrie Lester (AUS), Annabel Luxford (AUS), Michelle Vesterby (DEN), Radka Vodickova (CZE), Laurel Wassner (USA).

RELATED PHOTOS: 2014 Challenge Roth

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Dispatch: Melanie McQuaid’s Path To Paved-Road Success http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/training/dispatch-melanie-mcquaids-path-paved-road-success_104395 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/training/dispatch-melanie-mcquaids-path-paved-road-success_104395#comments Thu, 21 Aug 2014 13:36:27 +0000 Holly Bennett http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=104395

McQuaid winning Ironman 70.3 Boise back in June. Photo: Nils Nilsen/IRONMAN

McQuaid chats about tackling the 70.3 distance and shares a favorite run/strength session.

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McQuaid winning Ironman 70.3 Boise back in June. Photo: Nils Nilsen/IRONMAN

For more than a decade, Melanie McQuaid’s name has been synonymous with success at the pinnacle of off-road triathlon, the XTERRA World Championship. She duked it out in the dirt en route to three world titles in Maui (2003, 2005 and 2006), countless XTERRA series wins and the ITU Cross Triathlon World Championship (2011). But McQuaid, always one to court a challenge, also began dabbling in road triathlon, scoring Ironman 70.3 victories in 2010 (Lake Stevens) and 2012 (Oceanside). Turning her focus more fully to the 70.3 distance in 2013 she became a podium regular and, with a pair of decisive wire-to-wire wins thus far in 2014 (Ironman 70.3 Boise and last Sunday’s Ironman 70.3 Lake Stevens), McQuaid has proven she’s a committed contender–and a force to be feared–on the pro road circuit. Here, McQuaid shares her experience as an all-around “racer girl” and a favorite strength session that helps her prepare for the demands of running hard.

Triathlete.com: Congratulations on another outstanding race! How did you feel out there, both physically and confidence-wise, during your wire-to-wire performance?

MM: I did a very big block for me during the three weeks leading into the race, and each week I was feeling better and better. This week I needed a rest anyway, so the race fit in really well. With minimal travel I was able to use the race to check in with my fitness leading into Mont-Tremblant and maybe put some confidence in my pocket. Winning two races wire-to-wire in one season is fantastic and overall I am really pleased with how I have been able to maintain consistency in the past couple months. My swim continues to improve, thanks to a great group of athletes training together in Victoria, including Karen Thibodeau, Sara Gross, Steve Kilshaw and James Cook. I also get the chance to ride with Brent McMahon every once in a while, which is great. We are looking to recruit some more strong athletes! We are creating our own long-course town in Canada and I am happy to see my training partners getting results and attention for the hard work they have put in.

For me, to try to work my way up to race at the top tier in Ironman racing, I needed to be better at maintaining volume overall, but also specifically at increasing my run volume without sacrificing a lot of power on the bike. I was confident in the training I had done in this past block and I was looking forward to testing myself. Riding fast bike splits sets you up well in the race, but you have to run well to win races.

Triathlete.com: How are you enjoying the different style and strategy of racing now that the Ironman 70.3 is your main priority? Are there any pros and cons that really stand out in terms of skills that transfer over or, conversely, any areas in which you feel especially challenged?

MM: I really love the new challenge of 70.3, as I know it is making me a better triathlete overall–whether the race is on or off-road. I also feel like my background in mountain biking definitely prepared me more for Olympic and shorter style racing, so Ironman certainly was not my element and that is why I find it so compelling and addictive. I want to be better at something that isn’t my natural skill and I want to be challenged in that way. The satisfaction you get from improving on or succeeding in something that you may not have thought you were capable of is immense.

I think coming from XTERRA, athletes tend to have very good maximum power and really strong speed potential–similar to ITU but more geared towards strength, as so much of XTERRA is climbing. In this, XTERRA athletes have the power to be really strong cyclists and are used to being completely hammered coming off the bike and running on wooden legs. This translates well into Ironman stuff. However, the position in Ironman racing takes awhile to adapt to, as it is the polar opposite of where one might sit on the bike for mountain biking. That took me some time to get accustomed to and to get to where I could really train hard. I think the hours that are required for longer distance take a bit of time to work up to as well, as you first need to be able to absorb that much volume. Then to actually race over the longer distance, rather than just finish at a steady hard pace, requires some hard training in the volume. You need to be patient with development in this sport, as deep endurance takes time and hard work. There is no shortcut to becoming a really great long-distance athlete. I am still working at it!

RELATED: Making The Leap To Off-Road Triathlon

Triathlete.com: Although your focus is predominantly on 70.3s and you plan to race the World Championship in Mont-Tremblant, you’re also slated to race the XTERRA World Championship yet again. How will you approach the Maui race this year?

MM: I have learned that for me to perform my best, I need a good block of training that is finished at least two weeks out. In order to be really ready for Maui, I am not going to do the Utah race this year [the XTERRA USA Championship]. I believe a lot of my lack of success in Maui [in recent years] has been due to the fact that I just couldn’t come around after 70.3 Worlds and Utah because I was without training for too long, and/or I tried to cram too much work in too close to the event. So I am hoping a long block between Mont-Tremblant and Maui will help me to perform closer to my ability at the big show in Maui. Then I am planning another trip to Australia afterward, since that was so much fun last year and I believe the training block I do for Maui will pay off for more than one event [McQuaid finished second at Ironman 70.3 Shepparton in November 2013].

Triathlete.com: Do you have a favorite session that you’ve added since shifting your focus to road triathlon? 

MM: I am a big, big proponent of building and maintaining hip strength for running. I have a strength session that I personally do and that I ask a bunch of the athletes that I coach to do where we run at “next race pace” for 300m, then do a strength exercise, then run again. The run pace is the race pace for whatever event you have coming next, or, during a big training block, you can use the 300’s for a bit of speed work for economy and run at 5km pace. The strength exercise varies each round. This is the beginner stage of this workout, so as you improve you can increase to four rounds, and then again increase to 5x300m as you continue to improve. We do this maybe once every two weeks during a training block:

Warm up 10-20 minutes and do a couple of strides

Round 1 (4x300m and 4x strength exercises):
300m at race pace on the track, followed immediately by 20 squats
300m at race pace, followed immediately by 20 donkey kicks with each leg
Repeat
Rest 2 minutes after the full round (there is no rest between each exercise and the next 300m)

Round 2:
300m at race pace on the track, followed immediately by 20 steps of crab walk in each direction
300m at race pace, followed immediately by 20 mountain climbers counting on one leg
Repeat
Rest 2 minutes after the full round

Round 3:
300m at race pace on the track, followed immediately by 10 hot salsa lunges with each leg
300m at race pace, followed immediately by 10 single leg bridges per leg
Repeat
Rest 2 minutes after the full round

Cool down

Follow McQuaid’s journey on twitter @racergirlmel and learn more about her career and her coaching program at www.racergirl.com.

RELATED: The Rebirth Of Melanie McQuaid

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TriathlEats: Curry Chicken With Quinoa http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/nutrition/triathleats-curry-chicken-quinoa_104389 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/nutrition/triathleats-curry-chicken-quinoa_104389#comments Wed, 20 Aug 2014 20:56:12 +0000 Bethany Mavis http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=104389

Curry Chicken With Quinoa. Photo: AJFPhoto.com

With its mix of sweet, peppery and nutty flavors, this protein-rich dish will appease your post-race appetite.

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Curry Chicken With Quinoa. Photo: AJFPhoto.com


With its mix of sweet, peppery and nutty flavors, this protein-rich dish will appease your post-race appetite.

Ingredients

For curry chicken:
1 pound chicken thighs, skinless
and boneless
2 T madras curry powder
2 T olive oil
½ small onion, julienned
8–10 sprigs cilantro
4–5 cloves garlic, crushed
¼ tsp white pepper
1 tsp kosher salt
Juice of 1 lime

For arugula pistou:
10–12 basil leaves
3 cups arugula
2 cloves garlic
¼ cup toasted pumpkin seeds
½ cup extra virgin olive oil
¼ tsp ground cumin
½ tsp kosher salt

For quinoa salad:
½ cup tri-color or rainbow quinoa
Pinch of salt
¼ cup toasted pumpkin seeds
¼ cup dried cranberries
1½ cups arugula

Directions

Trim excess fat from chicken thighs and set aside. Combine curry powder, olive oil, onion, cilantro, garlic, pepper, kosher salt, lime juice and 1 cup water in a bowl and stir. Pour marinade into a plastic zip-top bag and add chicken thighs. Marinate in refrigerator for 4–12 hours. Remove the chicken from the marinade and place onto a hot grill for 6–8 minutes on each side until chicken is cooked through. To make the arugula pistou (a cold sauce, akin to pesto), combine all ingredients in a food processer and purée until smooth; set aside. To make the quinoa salad, rinse quinoa. Add 1 cup room-temperature water and salt to a rice steamer with quinoa and cook (or follow package directions). Once quinoa is cooked, mix with the remaining ingredients and 5 tablespoons of the arugula pistou. Place the quinoa salad on a plate, slice the chicken thighs and arrange over the salad. Alternatively, the chicken can be diced and tossed with the quinoa salad. Makes 2 servings.

To make this an easy post-race meal, chef Zane Holmquist usually marinates the chicken and prepares the arugula pistou the night before a race. If you keep the arugula leaves separate, you could even make the whole dish in advance—it reheats well, or tastes great cold. If you make extra pistou, it’s also great to mix in with tuna salad, brush on grilled vegetables or stir into hummus.

RELATED: Recipes For Recovery

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Kyle Buckingham’s Hardest Ironman Track Workout http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/training/kyle-buckinghams-hardest-ironman-track-workout_104382 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/training/kyle-buckinghams-hardest-ironman-track-workout_104382#comments Wed, 20 Aug 2014 20:06:55 +0000 Jené Shaw http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=104382

During the track workout. Photo provided by Kyle Buckingham.

This long, tough track workout was given to the Ironman Lake Placid champ as part of his training block with coach Raynard Tissink.

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During the track workout. Photo provided by Kyle Buckingham.

First-year pro Kyle Buckingham won his first Ironman in Lake Placid in July, clocking a 2:57 marathon to win by more than 12 minutes. The South African was the overall amateur winner at the Ironman World Championship in 2013, and his 8:37 was good enough for 16th overall. This year he’ll go back to Kona to race in the big leagues, fueled by tough sessions like the one below from his coach Raynard Tissink.

This long, tough track workout—it works out to be close to 20 miles—was given to him as part of his training block with Tissink.

“We like to use this session on a track to increase speed,” Buckingham says. “I would not say it’s my favorite workout but it is definitely beneficial to work on your speed.” He also uses it as an opportunity to test race fuel. “I like to practice my race nutrition by GU Energy on the track so I am comfortable when I get to a race and know exactly when to fuel.”

RELATED: Buckingham, Ferreira Get Breakout Wins At Lake Placid

Warm-up
2K easy

Main Set
28×1000 at marathon pace with very short (1–2 min) recovery

Cool-down
2K easy

RELATED: Victor Del Corral’s Hardest Workout

More tough workouts from the pros.

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Race Radar: San Diego Triathlon Classic http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/race-coverage/race-radar-san-diego-triathlon-classic_104378 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/race-coverage/race-radar-san-diego-triathlon-classic_104378#comments Wed, 20 Aug 2014 17:46:09 +0000 Bethany Mavis http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=104378

Since 2009, the San Diego Triathlon Classic has been drawing triathletes to a top-notch venue.

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Since 2009, the San Diego Triathlon Classic has been drawing triathletes to the top-notch venue of Liberty Station near downtown San Diego. This year, 800 athletes are expected to race the sprint- and Olympic-distance races, says Sara Danford, one of the race directors for the event.

The races start and finish from the former Naval Training Center at Liberty Station, and are organized by bike shop Moment Cycle Sport. Athletes start with a swim in the calm, protected waters of the Liberty Station boat channel (an inlet of the San Diego Bay), then take on a challenging bike course through Naval Base Point Loma with amazing views of the San Diego Bay and even south to Mexico, and will finish with a flat, fast run on the trails of the NTC Park.

The race is unique for a number of reasons: The national anthem is played by the Marine Band San Diego on race morning, the transition is very fair (no rack locations are better or worse than others), the course is extremely spectator-friendly and the venue features plenty of free parking a block from transition, and the race includes a post-race beer garden with local Stone Brewing Company beer as well as wine and mimosas. “We work hard to provide a high-quality, challenging and enjoyable event every year,” Danford says. “We’re continually working to improve our event and our participants’ experience.

RELATED: Triathlete Magazine Training Camp

Note: You can use the discount code TRIATHLETE to save $10 off race registration.

Details

What: San Diego Triathlon Classic
Where: San Diego, Calif.
When: Sept. 6, 2014
Distance: Olympic (1500-meter swim, 40K bike, 10K run) and sprint (750-meter swim, 22K bike and 5K run)
Website: Sandiegotriathlonclassic.com

If you think your local triathlon should be featured on Triathlete.com, send an email to bmavis@competitorgroup.com with the name of the race, website, and why you think other triathletes should know about it.

More Race Radar.

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2014 Nanjing Youth Olympic Games: Boys’ Race http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/photos/2014-nanjing-youth-olympic-games-boys-race_104267 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/photos/2014-nanjing-youth-olympic-games-boys-race_104267#comments Wed, 20 Aug 2014 17:14:03 +0000 Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=104267

Ben Dijkstra (GBR) and Daniel Hoy (NZL) battled it out down the blue carpet of the finishing chute.

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After a 750m swim, 20km bike and 5km run in wet conditions at Nanjing’s Xuanwu Lake on Monday, Ben Dijkstra (GBR) and Daniel Hoy (NZL) battled it out down the blue carpet of the finishing chute right until the finishing tape. But it was Dijkstra who just reached there first, claiming gold for Great Britain. Read the race recap.

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2014 Nanjing Youth Olympic Games: Girls’ Race http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/photos/2014-nanjing-youth-olympic-games-girls-race_104334 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/photos/2014-nanjing-youth-olympic-games-girls-race_104334#comments Wed, 20 Aug 2014 17:00:45 +0000 Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=104334

Australia’s Brittany Dutton rode a gutsy solo bike breakaway to claim Youth Olympic gold in Nanjing.

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Australia’s Brittany Dutton rode a gutsy solo bike breakaway to claim Youth Olympic gold in Nanjing on Sunday, Aug. 17, and continue Australia’s stellar success in women’s triathlon competition at the Olympic Games. The United States’ Stephanie Jenks earned the runner-up spot. Read the race recap.

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Stockholm Hosts World Triathlon Series This Weekend http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/news/stockholm-hosts-world-triathlon-series-weekend_104265 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/news/stockholm-hosts-world-triathlon-series-weekend_104265#comments Wed, 20 Aug 2014 16:13:25 +0000 Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=104265

Sarah Groff will be looking for important points. Photo: Janos Schmidt/Triathlon.org

Stockholm serves as the final opportunity to earn World Triathlon Series points ahead of the Edmonton Grand Final.

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Sarah Groff will be looking for important points. Photo: Janos Schmidt/Triathlon.org

In a final hunt for World Triathlon Series points just a week ahead of the Edmonton Grand Final, the men’s and women’s races are set to see serious battles with all the heavyweights throwing their punch behind World Triathlon Stockholm. Jodie Stimpson (GBR) and Sarah Groff (USA) will headline the women’s race while Javier Gomez Noya (ESP), Alistair Brownlee (GBR), Jonathan Brownlee(GBR), Mario Mola (ESP) and Richard Murray (RSA) will all line up in the men’s event.

About The Race

The capital of Sweden is over 700 years old and the greater metropolitan area now has a population of over two million, making it one of the largest cities in Scandinavia. Built on 14 islands around one of Europe’s largest and best-preserved medieval city centers, it is located by the Baltic Sea. It’s also a vibrant, modern city, famous for producing sleek designs, edgy fashion and world-class nightclubs. Stockholm also has a strong sporting history, the 1912 Stockholm Olympic Games set the benchmark for the Olympics of the modern era. It was the first time athletes from all five continents participated, and the first time live timing, photo finishes and a public address system were used.

The World Triathlon Series Rankings

In both the men’s and women’s races, as the penultimate event on the 2014 WTS calendar, Stockholm represents the last opportunity to put points on the chart. While Gwen Jorgensen will be tough to beat, the race for a top ranking remains competitive amongst the women. With No. 3 and 4 ranked athletes Helen Jenkins and Emma Jackson skipping Stockholm, it’s a prime opportunity for Stimpson to keep the distance at bay from her second-place ranking. Likewise, Groff and Sweetland will look to jump up. In the men’s race,

Gomez has already collected four wins meaning his score can’t improve much, but a top three finish will see his points jump slightly. While Alistair Brownlee (GBR) is out of the chase for a high finish in the Series this year, he can certainly steal important points from other athletes, affecting their year-end ranking. Although younger brother Jonathan sits second in the rankings, Mario Mola (ESP) trails him by only 15 points meaning this race is crucial to both Jonathan and Mola in the final ranking.

New Champions

There will be a new champion named in Stockholm in the women’s race with 2013 winner Gwen Jorgensen and Sweden’s own Lisa Norden, who won in 2012, not toeing the line. With them off the start list, the race should be Jodie Stimpson’s for the taking. However, standing on the highest spot on the podium won’t be guaranteed with the likes of Kirsten Sweetland(CAN) and Sarah Groff (USA) on the start list. Maaike Caelers (NED) and Barbara Riveros (CHI) are no strangers to success in Stockholm, having earned silver and bronze there in 2012.

Read the complete men’s preview at Triathlon.org.

Read the complete women’s preview at Triathlon.org.

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Be A Runner And A Triathlete http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/training/runner-triathlete_104262 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/training/runner-triathlete_104262#comments Wed, 20 Aug 2014 13:24:20 +0000 Jené Shaw http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=104262

You can be a runner and a triathlete. Photo: John David Becker

Can you properly train for a running race during the tri season? With careful execution, here’s how to do it.

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You can be a runner and a triathlete. Photo: John David Becker

Can you properly train for a running race during the tri season? With careful execution, here’s how to do it.

As compared to triathlons, standalone running races are not only fun and logistically easy, they can also serve as an opportunity to test your fitness or set PR’s in various run distances. A focus on one leg of triathlon, however, means there’s an inevitable give and take with the other two sports. It’s a tricky balance to target a running race while you also have triathlons looming, and you don’t want to become a better runner at the sake of underperforming as a triathlete.

The good news is that with proper planning, training for a running race may actually better your overall triathlon season. “Racing shorter distances can be very beneficial for triathlon because improvement will trickle down to better performances during the run legs of triathlon races,” says coach Bethany Rutledge, the Atlanta Triathlon Club coaching director and fitness program director for Energy Lab Fitness.

RELATED: Running Vs. Triathlon Running

Set your schedule

There are two ways to look at your goals for a running race. Are you “training through” a 10K to use it as a fitness marker? Or are you targeting the race for a personal best?

Training through: You can jump in a local 5K or 10K and treat it like you would a normal “B” or “C” triathlon. Bake it into your schedule and run it at a hard (race simulation or tempo pace) but not all-out effort, and give yourself a little bit of time to recover without completely interrupting your training schedule for your “A” race.

PR: Schedule your running race at least 8–12 weeks away from your triathlon “A” race, especially for longer races (e.g., a marathon followed by a target 70.3). “The running race should be set up as part of your overall periodization goals to be completed no later than eight weeks prior to the most important race of the year,” says exercise physiologist Krista Austin, Ph.D. “If someone is working to bring up his run for the year, it is best to put in a significant run block the first five months of the cycle and then race primarily for the run. This training can then be used in conjunction with the bike and swim to peak for the primary ‘A’ race of the year for triathlon.”

RELATED: How To Plan A Fun And Successful Season

How much do I swim and bike?

“It will depend on how much of the training volume will be replaced with running to help build the strength needed, especially for a marathon,” Austin says. She says most athletes need at least one aerobic bike and mixed threshold/VO2max workout to keep fitness. And although swimming depends on the amount of time between events and your background as an athlete—former collegiate swimmers can probably get away with putting the pool on the back burner versus adult-onset swimmers—she recommends most get at least three swim sessions per week to maintain feel for the water.

“Other considerations are usually just about mentally handling that your bike and swim will not be there when training for the primary run race unless you are already strong enough to run it off of your current run capabilities,” Austin says. Ask yourself honestly: Can you come to grips with the fact that your swim and bike fitness will be sacrificed in order to achieve your run goals?

Most importantly, schedule your swims and bikes to accommodate your hardest run days.

RELATED: The First Four Steps Of Improving Your Run

Bottom line: Prioritize

If you’re the type who would race every weekend if you could, be smart and pick the events you want to excel at most. “Overall, it’s important to be realistic and give yourself a bit more time to transition between event types than you think you’ll need,” Rutledge says. “If you want to race lots of events of different types—which is a good thing—you need to set priorities and pick a couple where you want to do your very best. For the rest of them, you can still try your hardest, but you might not have that extra gear to give.”

RELATED: 7 Ways To Fit Training Into Your Life

What about running a marathon in the off-season?

It’s a trickier prospect, according to Rutledge. “If folks want to run a marathon specifically to boost their tri training or experience what it feels like before an Ironman, then I normally try to dissuade them,” she says. “However, if their goal is primarily to do well at marathons and triathlons, or if they consider themselves to be primarily runners and then triathletes, then I relax my stance a bit. Certainly, marathon training can cut into your swim and bike prep, but at the end of the day nearly all of us are doing this for fun.”

RELATED: Should I Run A Marathon In The Off-Season?

Ideal sample schedule

- Feb. 15 half-marathon
- May 17 10K training race
- May 30 Ironman 70.3
- June 26 Ironman

NOT ideal schedule*

- April 13 Cannes International Triathlon
- April 21 Boston Marathon
- May 2 Ironman 70.3 St. George

*As realized by the author of this article

Come train (and race!) with us! We’re hosting the first ever Triathlete Magazine Training Camp Sept. 17-21 in San Diego, Calif. Learn more here.

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