Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com Triathlon Training, Gear, Nutrition, Photos, Race Results & Calendars Mon, 20 Oct 2014 21:33:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 USAT Age Group Nationals To Return To Milwaukee In 2015 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/news/usat-age-group-nationals-return-milwaukee-2015_108279 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/news/usat-age-group-nationals-return-milwaukee-2015_108279#comments Mon, 20 Oct 2014 21:11:39 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=108279

Age Group Nationals returns to Milwaukee for a third year in 2015. Photo: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image

USA Triathlon today announced that it will return to Milwaukee, Wisconsin for the USA Triathlon Age Group National Championships.

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Age Group Nationals returns to Milwaukee for a third year in 2015. Photo: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image

USA Triathlon today announced that it will return to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on Aug. 8-9, 2015 for the USA Triathlon Age Group National Championships, the organization’s largest and longest-running National Championships event.

Read the news from USA Triathlon below:

The event first came to Milwaukee and the city’s Lake Michigan lakeshore in 2013, hosting a record field of nearly 4,000 athletes at the Milwaukee Art Museum and Discovery World. The economic impact of the 2013 event was nearly $5.8 million, and the event was also voted the Best Urban Triathlon in the 2013 Triathlon Business International Triathletes’ Choice Awards. In 2014, the event sold out with a registered field of 5,700 athletes vying for national titles and world championships spots in the Olympic-distance and sprint events on Aug. 9-10.

“The City of Milwaukee and our local organizing committee have been superb hosts over the past two years while helping us welcome record fields for this marquee race,” said Rob Urbach, USA Triathlon CEO. “The participant feedback for the venue and the entire event experience has been overwhelmingly positive, so we are thrilled to announce the USA Triathlon Age Group National Championships – one of the sport’s largest events – will return to Milwaukee in 2015.”

“We are honored that USA Triathlon has decided to return to Milwaukee for an unprecedented third time in 2015,” said Paul Upchurch, President and CEO of VISIT Milwaukee. “Milwaukee’s lakefront has proved to be a spectacular venue for this event, which results in nearly $6 million in economic impact to the community. This amazing event would not be possible without the hard work of the entire community to ensure that the triathlon runs smoothly and the athletes have the best experience possible.”

The Aug. 8 Olympic-distance race features a 1,500-meter swim, 40-kilometer bike and 10-kilometer run, while the sprint race on Aug. 9 will showcase a 750m swim, 20k bike and 5k run. The races will serve as qualifiers for Team USA, the select group of amateur triathletes who represent the U.S. at International Triathlon Union World Championship events. The 2015 Age Group Nationals in Milwaukee will serve as the sole event qualifier for Team USA for the 2016 ITU Age Group World Championships, with location for that event still to be determined.

RELATED PHOTOS: 2014 USAT Age Group Nationals

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Kona Winner’s Gallery: Sebastian Kienle http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/photos/kona-winners-gallery-sebastian-kienle_108251 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/photos/kona-winners-gallery-sebastian-kienle_108251#comments Mon, 20 Oct 2014 20:40:48 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=108251

Look back on Sebastian Kienle's Ironman World Championship winning performance.

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RELATED:
- Sebastian Kienle: I’m So Happy I Had Enough In The Tank
- Sebastian Kienle, Mirinda Carfrae Take 2014 Ironman World Titles
- Kona Pro Bike: Sebastian Kienle’s Scott Plasma 5

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How To Become A Better Climber On The Bike http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/training/conquer-the-climbs-on-the-bike_90203 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/training/conquer-the-climbs-on-the-bike_90203#comments Mon, 20 Oct 2014 19:30:37 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=90203

Photo: Thierry Sourbier/Endurapix

These four tips—specifically geared toward triathlon racing—will make you a better all-around climber.

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Photo: Thierry Sourbier/Endurapix

Whether or not you consider yourself a king of the mountains, your bike doesn’t care if you are riding on a pancake-flat road or a monstrous climb. It merely responds to a combination of how hard you push on the pedals (torque) and how fast you spin the cranks (angular velocity). The product of those two things is power (measured in watts).

Picture this: Your bike trainer is attached to a floor lamp with a 100-watt bulb. You can illuminate the lamp by pedaling the bike—either by shifting into a really hard gear and pedaling slowly or by spinning at a high cadence in an easy gear to reach your 100-watt goal. Either approach will get the job done, but an optimal middle ground is likely more sustainable.

So now I hear you saying, “Yep, I get all that, but I still suck at climbing!” Let’s make the assumption that you do not suck at riding on flat roads and, as mentioned previously, the bike doesn’t know the difference. Now, let’s apply the same skills that help make you a solid rider on flattish roads and put them into play on the hilly sections. Note that while these tips will make you a better all-around climber, they are specifically geared toward triathlon racing.

RELATED – Wheels Of Choice: When To Ride Your Road Bike

Effort management

Whether you are using perceived effort, a heart rate monitor, a power meter, or all three to help guide you toward an optimal bike split, you probably don’t make a habit of dramatically increasing your effort or speed while riding along on a flat stretch of road, do you? Then why do so when going uphill? Most triathlon coaches agree that the fastest bike split is achieved by dosing your effort as evenly as possible from T1 to T2, with no more than a 10 percent increase on uphill and upwind sections.

RELATED – Try This Bike Workout: Standing Flats

Gearing and cadence

“10 percent—that’s impossible!” you say? I’ve watched hundreds of triathletes struggle needlessly up hills of assorted lengths and pitches, and many do so with a few easier gears still available on their cassette, a sluggish cadence and a very high level of effort. Instead, use both front and rear shifters generously with the goal of maintaining a similar effort and cadence (85–95 RPM) as you transition from flat roads to climbing sections and back down, and your bike won’t even know the difference.

RELATED: Linsey Corbin’s Bike Strength Workout

Choosing the right cassette

“But I’m in my granny gear as soon as the road tilts upward!” Sound familiar? Count the number of teeth on the largest cog on your cassette (the cluster of gears attached to your rear wheel). If you count 25 or less, then head right to your bike shop and ask them to replace your cassette with one with 28 or more teeth (a Shimano 105 11-28t runs about $60).

If you still run out of gears and your effort continues to go through the roof, then it’s time to back off on your cadence until your effort (power and heart rate) come down to within 10 percent of what they were on the flats. Further, you may start to doubt yourself as others blow by at near their max heart rate, but trust that you will indeed reel them back in and leave them in your dust when the course flattens out, and definitely when it comes time to run.

RELATED – Get In Gear: Understanding Your Bike’s Gears

The standing climb

The biggest mistake triathletes make when they choose to stand for climbing sections is selecting too easy a gear. The resulting high cadence causes the heart rate to skyrocket with little, if any increase in speed. Instead, enjoy a change of position and some relief to your low back and rear end by standing and shifting to a slightly harder gear—one that allows you to pedal a cadence no greater than 50–60 RPM as you use body weight to help.

RELATED: Tough Big Gear Bike Workout

Follow Triathlete on Twitter @Triathletemag for inspiration, new workout ideas, gear reviews from our editors and more.

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3 Jogging Strollers For Triathlete Parents http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/gear-tech/3-jogging-strollers-triathlete-parents_108250 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/gear-tech/3-jogging-strollers-triathlete-parents_108250#comments Mon, 20 Oct 2014 18:46:23 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=108250

Photo: John David Becker

Pushing your little one in a jogging stroller is also a great strength builder.

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Photo: John David Becker


Think having a kid will make you a slower triathlete? Think again. Not only does being a parent make you more efficient at scheduling workouts (and—for moms—give you extra motivation to regain your pre-baby body), but pushing your little one in a jogging stroller is also a great strength builder. Once baby is old enough to hold his or her head up, hit the roads with one of these three ready-to-run strollers.

BOB Revolution Flex

($480, Bobgear.com)
Great for: Major mileage

The newest stroller in BOB’s Revolution line, the smooth-rolling Flex features an adjustable handlebar with nine position options, allowing any parent to find the perfect fit. The Flex’s adjustable suspension system was noticeably the smoothest ride of those tested. Assembly is relatively simple for anyone familiar with a bike’s quick-release lever system, and the stroller folds compactly in two easy steps. Testers loved the two internal seat pockets, perfect for stowing snacks and toys.

Caveat: Accessories are sold separately—you’ll want a handlebar console with cup holders for long runs ($25).

The details
- Weighs 26.2 lbs
- Available in a double
- Recommended for jogging with a child at least 8 months old
- Can purchase car seat adapter separately for walking with an infant

RELATED – Tri’d It: BOB Ironman Stroller

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Josh Amberger, Radka Vodickova Win 70.3 Port Mac http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/news/josh-amberger-radka-vodickova-win-70-3-port-mac_108245 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/news/josh-amberger-radka-vodickova-win-70-3-port-mac_108245#comments Mon, 20 Oct 2014 16:40:08 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=108245

Radka Vodickova. Photo: Delly Carr

Josh Amberger and Radka Vodickova claimed the victories at Sunday's Ironman 70.3 Port Macquarie.

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Radka Vodickova. Photo: Delly Carr

Defending Ironman 70.3 Port Macquarie champion Josh Amberger rode his way to victory for the second year in a row, using his powerful bike leg to hold off dual Olympian Brad Kahlefeldt by just 33 seconds. While the men’s race went right down to the wire, the Czech Republic’s Radka Vodickova was in a class of her own leading out of the water, increasing her lead on the bike and running away with victory by over seven minutes.

Read the recap from Ironman Asia Pacific below:

Men’s Race
Amberger knew he needed a big lead off the bike to have any chance of defending his 2013 title. Leading out of the swim he got just what the doctor ordered starting the 21.1km run leg with over seven minutes up his sleeve.

By the half way mark it looked like that wouldn’t be enough as Kahlefeldt had reduced the deficit to just over three minutes.

“I knew seven minutes off the bike would be tough to run down, but I knew I could get close, but it’s a difficult thing to do to run from that far back,” Kahlefeldt said.

In the end Kahlefeldt ran out of steam finishing 33 seconds behind Amberger.

“I was just too far back off the bike, I gave it everything I had, but in the end it wasn’t enough,” Kahlefeldt said.

Amberger produced a carbon copy of his race last year, exiting the water with a 38-second buffer and he laid it all on the line on the bike knowing the faster runners in the field would be coming at him.

A seven-plus minute lead off the bike combined with a 1:19:50 run split was just enough for Amberger to hold Kahlefeldt who ran an incredible 1:12:59.

“This course suits me down to the ground, I love the place and love the support,” Amberger said. “I received amazing support out there, and I’d love to come back every year and race, you can’t beat that atmosphere.”

Since making the switch to 70.3 from short-course racing Kahlefeldt has had some great results.

“I love this style of racing, it’s a change from the ITU. I’m starting to get better and better, maybe next year I may do a full Ironman, maybe Ironman Melbourne or Ironman Australia.

Fellow Aussie Alex Reithmeier rounded out the podium in third.

Women’s race
Coming off the back of a second place finish at Ironman 70.3 Sunshine Coast, Vodickova produced a wire-to-wire win, leading by 19 seconds out of the water. She built on that lead during the 90km bike to begin the run, her strongest leg, ahead by over two minutes. She rounded off her day with a blistering-fast run split of 1:26:25 to secure her third Ironman 70.3 victory this year by more than seven minutes.

After her win she paid tribute to her partner Brad Kahlefeldt. “He’s in great form himself, and is a great coach and boyfriend,” she said.

“I love the non-drafting format of racing, and it’s great for me and really suits my strengths,” she continued.

“I was surprised because I expected to be a bit behind after the bike, but I loved the bike course, I loved the hills.”

Australian Madeleine Oldfield finished second with defending champion Lisa Marangon rounding out the podium in a sprint finish with New Zealand’s Anna Russell.

Ironman 70.3 Port Macquarie 
Port Macquarie, New South Wales, Australia
1.2-mile swim, 56-mile bike, 13.1-mile run

Men
1 .Josh Amberger (AUS) 3:55:26
2. Brad Kahlefeldt (AUS) 3:56:00
3. Alex Reithmeier (AUS) 3:59:51
4. Sam Appleton (AUS) 4:00:32
5. Casey Munro (AUS) 4:01:07

Women
1. Radka Vodickova (CZE) 4:30:39
2. Madeleine Odefield (AUS) 4:38:09
3. Lisa Marangon (AUS) 4:39:20
4. Anna Russell (AUS) 4:39:25
5. Jessica Fleming (AUS) 4:40:04

Complete results.

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Prevent Achilles Tendon Injuries With This Exercise http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/training/monday-minute-eccentric-calf-raise-2_46973 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/training/monday-minute-eccentric-calf-raise-2_46973#comments Mon, 20 Oct 2014 16:30:08 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=46973

Learn about the eccentric calf raise, an effective move for the prevention of calf muscle strains and Achilles tendon injuries.

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This week Tim Crowley and friends demonstrate the eccentric calf raise, an effective move for the prevention of calf muscle strains and Achilles tendon injuries.

More one-minute exercise videos from Triathlete.com.

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Why You Should Learn The Backstroke http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/training/why-you-should-learn-the-backstroke_51696 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/training/why-you-should-learn-the-backstroke_51696#comments Mon, 20 Oct 2014 11:04:04 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=51696

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Learn why the backstroke is helpful to triathletes. It's also an easy stroke to learn, so no excuses!

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

The backstroke is easy to learn and helpful to triathletes for multiple reasons. It counteracts swimmer’s “shoulder slouch” by engaging upper-back muscles and lengthening pectorals, it can provide an opportunity to calm breathing or clear goggles during an open-water swim and it breaks up monotony in the pool. Plus, kicking while on your back serves as good cross-training for major cycling muscles such as the hip flexors, core and quads.

Try these sets: 

• 4×75 with 15 seconds rest (25 free/25 back/25 free)
• 1×600 [4x(100 freestyle strong effort/50 backstroke easy)]
• 8×50 on 1:15 (25 back/25 free) descend time 1-4, 5-8

RELATED: Six Common Swimming Myths (And How To Avoid Them)

Five technique tips:

1. Tilt chin up and look at the sky. This puts head and spine in good alignment. Do not look toward your toes, as it causes hips to sink.

2. Push hips toward the surface and maintain a steady up and down flutter kick. Keep feet just below the surface of the water. Do not rotate feet with the rest of body.

3. Hands exit the water thumb first and enter the water pinky first. This requires a slight wrist and shoulder rotation as a straight arm moves through the air.

4. Arms enter the water straight up from shoulders and do not cross the centerline overhead. Swimming backstroke in a straight line is difficult without following pool lines. Keep zigzags to a minimum with consistent arm placement.

5. The key to backstroke is good upper-body rotation with a motionless head. Try to roll your left shoulder to your chin as the right pinky enters the water and vice versa.

RELATED: How To Analyze Your Own Swim Stroke 

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Avoid Late-Season Burnout http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/training/avoid-late-season-burnout_89559 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/training/avoid-late-season-burnout_89559#comments Fri, 17 Oct 2014 16:20:03 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=89559

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Stay on track for your peak race of the year.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

Stay on track for your peak race of the year.

For many amateur triathletes, fall means it’s time to wind down the training, start (finally) practicing yoga or get back to focusing on work or family. But for top age groupers or anyone targeting a late-season “A” race, now is the time to peak and perform at your best without burning out after a long year of training and racing.

Qualifying for any of triathlon’s world championships means you have the talent and drive to race to the top of the age-group rankings. It also means—especially after a season of qualifying long-course races—that you have to find a delicate balance in order to peak, race well enough to qualify and then recover multiple times throughout the year, all while keeping up the motivation to train hard day in and day out. Nailing that perfect train-enough-but-not-too-much ratio can be tricky. If you don’t battle through some fatigue to gain fitness, you’ll never improve. But if you work too hard for too long without allowing the body to recover and adapt, you could wind up racing your worst right when you need to be racing your best.

The extreme result of neglecting proper recovery is overtraining syndrome, a medical term that is often tossed around but not always understood or properly diagnosed. Put simply, the syndrome is a result of overdoing your capacity for exercise and winding up with a decline in performance. The consequential physiological and psychological effects can go beyond just one bad race result—they could lead to career-ending consequences.

Overtraining syndrome doesn’t happen overnight or even over the course of a tough training week. “To get there, you have to have ignored the signs for weeks,” says elite coach Gordo Byrn. “When I’ve bumped into situations with overtrained athletes, they just couldn’t get out of bed—they are completely exhausted, their hormones completely out of whack.” Although some of the warning signs are desirable (fatigue is a natural result of training hard), it’s important to be able to identify when you’re pushing your body past its limit.

Because it takes a lot of willpower to train through extreme fatigue, the personality types most susceptible to overtraining are the classic Type-A triathletes. “It’s the perfectionist, the obsessive ‘enough is never enough’ athlete who is always striving for more—the very same personality qualities that make for an elite athlete,” says Dr. Mimi Winsberg, a psychiatrist, coach and multiple Ironman Hawaii finisher.

Although the syndrome is more prominent in elite athletes who are singularly focused on triathlon, coach and exercise physiologist Krista Austin, Ph.D., says that doesn’t necessarily make age-group athletes less vulnerable to overtraining. “Many amateur athletes define themselves by how well they do in races,” she says. “I think a lot of them get too caught up in trying to take out the next age grouper.” In addition to chasing PRs and podium spots, age groupers have the mental stress of putting food on the table, keeping bosses happy and making time for family and friends. This mental stress, combined with a heavy training load, can be a recipe for disaster.

The Diagnosis Problem

As a medical condition, overtraining syndrome is not an easy one to identify. Incredible fatigue and the inability to bounce back to a regular level of performance within two weeks of adequate rest is the telltale sign. “The problem with overtraining syndrome is that there may be multiple types or variances, making it difficult to categorize and treat every patient the same because the symptoms can be quite varied,” says Dr. Kenneth Taylor, director of sports medicine at the University of California, San Diego. The list of symptoms associated with the syndrome are all across the board: chronic fatigue, elevated resting heart rate, recurring infections, weight loss, erratic sleep, night sweats, decreased motivation and moodiness.

Taylor calls the syndrome a “diagnosis of exclusion.” For the most part, overtrained athletes experience extreme fatigue, but that alone is a common symptom in practically every ailment—from infections to vitamin deficiencies—which makes it difficult to pinpoint one solid, obvious indicator. He says there’s a lot of overlap with thyroid disease and anemia; Winsberg points out that the symptoms look very similar to depression.

“There’s no one blood marker or finding that is the hallmark of this disease,” Taylor says. “There are some indicators that we lump together to come up with a diagnosis, but it’s not like Hepatitis B where you do a blood test and it’s positive. Overtraining syndrome is not clear-cut.”

When an athlete becomes overtrained, there’s a host of disruptions in the body, mainly stemming from an overactive pituitary gland. There’s an interruption to the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, the hormone regulator, which can act as negative feedback. “You’ll see too much cortisol relative to the other hormones, decreased testosterone and changes in things like metabolism and serotonin. You get this whole biological cascade that happens when you don’t let the body rest,” Winsberg says.

RELATED – Keep The Fire Alive: Avoid Late-Season Burnout

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Quick Set Friday: Race 75s http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/training/quick-set-friday-race-75s_97305 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/training/quick-set-friday-race-75s_97305#comments Fri, 17 Oct 2014 16:18:21 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=97305

Photo: Shutterstock.com

A new swim workout from Triathlete contributor and superstar swimmer Sara McLarty.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

Triathlete contributor and swimming all-star Sara McLarty has a blog with more than 500 creative workouts used in her Masters swim program in Clermont, Fla. We’ll feature a workout every Friday so you have new ideas to take to the pool. On her blog (Mastersswimworkoutsbysaramclarty.blogspot.com), you can pick a Monday set for a long distance focus, a Wednesday set for sprint training, or Friday for creative open water skills.

A:
300 swim/300 pull/300 drill/300 kick
4×200 pull @ 3:00 (3/5/3/7 breathing pattern by 50)
8×25 @ :30 (1/2 FAST!, 1/2 easy)
20×100 @ 1:50 (75 RACE!/ 25 easy)
200 cool-down
*4400 total*

RELATED – Ask Coach Sara: The Optimal Strokes Per Breath

B:
300 swim/300 pull/300 drill/300 kick
3×200 pull @ 4:00 (3/5/3/7 breathing pattern by 50)
8×25 @ :40 (1/2 FAST!, 1/2 easy)
15×100 @ 2:30 (75 RACE!/ 25 easy)
200 cool-down
*3700 total*

RELATED – Ask Coach Sara: How To Use A Snorkel In Training

C:
200 swim/200 pull/200 drill/200 kick
3×150 pull w/ :30 rest (3/5/3 breathing pattern by 50)
6×25 w/ :15 rest (1/2 FAST!, 1/2 easy)
10×100 w/ :30 rest (75 RACE!/ 25 easy)
100 cool-down
*2500 total*

More swim workouts from Sara McLarty.

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An Off-Season Cleanse For Triathletes http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/nutrition/an-off-season-cleanse-for-triathletes_17306 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/nutrition/an-off-season-cleanse-for-triathletes_17306#comments Fri, 17 Oct 2014 16:10:33 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=17306

A centuries-old nutrition tradition could help you come out of the off-season on a stronger note.

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Find out how incorporating a centuries-old nutrition tradition could help you come out of the off-season on a stronger note.

Athletes are always trying to get an edge on the competition. Most of the time the points of entry are through gear and nutritional technology, and with those it’s always about the input. But what if gaining a competitive edge came in the form of not doing something? And what if that “not doing” related to your food intake? For most athletes the idea of not eating conjures up thoughts that range from ridiculous to absurd. But, using a centuries-old tradition for maintaining health could soon become part of your next training plan.

Fasting does not always mean the complete absence of food. In fact, some fasts incorporate eating into their modality, so for athletes a better term to use would be cleansing. Even better would be “recovery,” something that John Ivy, author of The Performance Zone, feels athletes do not pay enough attention to or understand how it relates to performance. The stresses and rigors placed upon a body during the racing season, along with the production of free radicals and the consumption of processed foods and fuels, can result in muscle and cell damage, injuries, digestive problems and an overall lack of vitality. Without proper recovery, these issues only subside until they are exacerbated by the racing season. You can’t have an “on-season” without having an off-season, and exercising is only half of the equation.

A guided and comprehensive cleansing program based in fresh juices made from fruits and vegetables along with some supportive supplements can provide the body with an opportunity to heal and repair all of its physical issues. According to Stephen Harrod Buhner, author of The Fasting Path, “fasting stimulates a more than twofold increase in IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor) binding protein,” which increases lean tissue development, muscle formation, tissue repair, organ health, bone strength and energy levels. Sometimes, the less you do, the more you gain.

To accompany your off-season cleanse, try this juice recipe. Remember that juices should be freshly made and pressed or extracted. No pulp allowed. Here is one of my favorite recipes. Watermelon has tons of lycopene, which supports the cardiovascular system and tastes great, while cilantro helps to collect toxins in the body, lime adds in some vitamin C, and the ginger helps with digestion with a bit of zing.

RELATED – Self (Re)Made Man: Rich Roll

Watermelon Cooler
3 cups watermelon, OK to include some rind
1 lime
½ bunch cilantro (You can also add or substitute mint.)
Knob of ginger
Directions:
Place all ingredients in juicer, strain through cheesecloth and enjoy.

Adam Kelinson is the author of The Athlete’s Plate: Real Food for High Performance (VeloPress) and owner of Organic Performance. He regularly guides athletes through his program, “The Athlete’s Cleanse.”

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Video: An Overview On Recovery http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/training/video-an-overview-on-recovery_90308 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/training/video-an-overview-on-recovery_90308#comments Fri, 17 Oct 2014 16:03:27 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=90308

Sage Rountree explains how recovering properly will help you reap the benefits of hard workouts.

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In this video, Sage Rountree, author of “The Athlete’s Guide To Recovery” explains how recovering properly will help you reap the benefits of hard workouts.

More recovery tips from Triathlete.com.

We’ve gone digital! Sign up for a digital subscription of Triathlete to get our monthly issues for your digital device. In addition to the regular monthly content you’ll get exclusive videos, photos and more embedded in your issue.

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Photos: The Final Hour In Kona http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/photos/photos-final-hour-kona_108192 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/photos/photos-final-hour-kona_108192#comments Fri, 17 Oct 2014 15:59:19 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=108192

Photographer Paul Phillips returned to the finish line in Kona to capture the final hour of the Ironman World Championship

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Photos: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image

Photographer Paul Phillips returned to the finish line in Kona to capture the final hour of the Ironman World Championship. The later it gets, the music gets louder and the crowd amps up its enthusiasm.

More photos from Kona:

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Think Pink: Tri Gear For October http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/photos/think-pink-tri-gear-october_108218 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/photos/think-pink-tri-gear-october_108218#comments Fri, 17 Oct 2014 15:02:53 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=108218

A portion of the proceeds from all of this swim, bike and run gear will go to support breast cancer research.

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A portion of the proceeds from all of this swim, bike and run gear will go to support breast cancer research.

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5 Ways Nutrition Can Help Manage Training Stress http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/news/5-ways-nutrition-can-help-manage-training-stress_108185 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/news/5-ways-nutrition-can-help-manage-training-stress_108185#comments Fri, 17 Oct 2014 06:19:29 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=108185

By Susann Kraeftner, MD The term stress was first used in biology by Walter B. Cannon, an American physiologist in 1914. It was borrowed

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Yvonne Van Vlerken

By Susann Kraeftner, MD

The term stress was first used in biology by Walter B. Cannon, an American physiologist in 1914. It was borrowed from the field of physics and describes the force that produces strain on a physical object. By that original definition, a piece of metal bends because of the stress, exerted on it. The humanistic definition of stress describes a force that can push person to his breaking point, and the right nutrition can help an athlete cope.

Cannon and French physiologist Claude Bernard defined stress as the biological process of adapting to sustain internal balance, or homeostasis.

Nowadays our stress situations are not directly life-threatening anymore, but still can massively impair quality of life. Deeply ingrained into our body are the chains of processes that take place to react to life-threatening stress. Dealing with stressful situations of any variety is exhausting for all the bodily systems. The physical demands of training for triathlon introduces an additional type of stress that ordinary citizens don’t experience.

The regulatory network that is located in the brain constantly assesses the level of stress experienced by the body and causes it to react accordingly. Beestings, a natural nutrition product produced by cows also known as colostrum, has proven to be a very powerful stress modulator that helps this internal, subconscious chain of communication. It makes an athlete more stress resistant and less susceptible to many kinds of bodily hazards. Here’s how:

Reason 1: Increased cell durability

The cells that cover all body surfaces, including the lungs, skin and stomach, are called epithelials and they are especially sensitive to injury. If the internal cells are unable to fight off damage or replace themselves rapidly, it has a serious impact on our wellbeing. Studies suggest that beestings makes these cells more resistant to various stress factors, including heat, pH shifts, toxins and mechanical forces.

Reason 2: Strengthening the immune system

Immunoglubulins are key molecules in sustaining the body’s immune balance. Studies have shown that the immunoglobulins in beestings enter the body and apply their regulatory effects. In the gut they act as bacteria and toxin scavengers; inside the body they exert regulatory functions.

Reason 3: Defeat unwanted bacteria

Lactoferrin and Lactoperoxidase are natural antibacterial agents in beestings that protect your gut.

Reason 4: Bolster cell regeneration

Factors with the potential to foster communication among cells and initiate growth play another important role when it comes to the regeneration of cells and epithelia in specific.

Reason 5: Controlling inflammation

The effects of beestings impact the body as a whole. Its effects are manifold due to its natural multivalent composition similar to our blood serum. The overall effects of beestings can be summarized as modulating inflammatory states based on stress. The components listed above should give you an idea of the complexity of this substance. It is being researched extensively, but looking at all the elements of beestings at the same time is not easy. Therefore scientists have to reduce the complexity. They can only focus on a few molecules at a time. Of course, the results are flawed because the whole is more than just an addition of the single molecules, so are the effects.

It is your experience that counts. Try beestings and see for yourself, because science is not able yet to give a thorough cause-effect explanation.

Susann Kraeftner, MD, the founder and scientist behind Biestmilch, has worked in intensive care and the pharmaceutical industry. For many years she was looking to escape medicine and finda way to get involved with a more creative way of working. Since 2000 I have pursued my life experiment to resuscitate beestings as sports nutrition. We call it Biestmilch. Go to Biestmilch.com to learn more. 

 

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Recipe Of The Week: Ahi-Mango-Avocado Stacks http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/nutrition/recipe-week-ahi-mango-avocado-stacks_108181 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/nutrition/recipe-week-ahi-mango-avocado-stacks_108181#comments Thu, 16 Oct 2014 21:53:23 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=108181

If you're just returning home from Kona and need a meal that reminds you of island life these Ahi stacks will do the trick.

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Whether you are just returning home from Kona and need a meal that reminds you of island life, or simply want a recipe idea that is fresh and easy to make, these Ahi stacks will do the trick.

Ingredients

Makes 4 servings

1 pound sashimi grade ahi
1 large mango
2 small avocados
½ red bell pepper, finely diced
¼ cup freshly chopped cilantro
1 teaspoon Serrano pepper (seeds removed), minced
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed orange juice
1 tablespoon orange zest
1 teaspoon lemon zest
1/8 teaspoon salt
1 English Cucumber

RELATED: Tuna Poke Bowl Recipe

Preparation

1. Cut the ahi into small (1/4 inch) size cubes, and toss with the orange and lemon zest in a bowl.
2. Cut the mango open and score the inside into equal size (as the ahi) cubes. Use a spoon to remove into bowl.
3. Cut the avocado open and do the same as the mango.
4. Add the red pepper, cilantro, Serrano pepper, orange juice and salt to the bowl and toss gently to combine.
5. Cut the cucumber at a diagonal. You will need 4 to 5 pieces per plate in a flat star pattern.
6. Using a ring mold* make the stacks by placing ¼ of the ahi into the mold, then topped with ¼ of the mango avocado mixture.
7. Repeat this process on the other 3 plates and serve with extra cucumber slices, beet chips, sweet potato chips or stone ground corn chips.

*If you don’t have a ring mold cut both ends of a can and clean out the inside. You will use this to make the stacks. A smaller can will make a higher stack and a larger can will make a lower/wider stack.

RELATED – TriathlEats: A Healthy Ahi Tuna Dish

Jess Cerra is the owner of Fit Food by Jess, a private chef and catering company in Encinitas, Calif. Jess recently launched Harmony Bar, and all natural gluten-and soy free bar designed to tasted like a soft baked cookie. She is an ex-professional XTERRA triathlete and mountain biker, and current elite amateur road cyclist for the SPY GIANT RIDE p/b MRI Endurance team. Follow Jess’ recipes on her “Fit Food by Jess” Facebook page, as well as the “Harmony Bar” Facebook page. Also on twitter @fitfoodbyjess and @harmonybars.

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Dispatch: Kona Lessons From Hoffman And Potts http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/ironman/dispatch-kona-lessons-hoffman-potts_108172 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/ironman/dispatch-kona-lessons-hoffman-potts_108172#comments Thu, 16 Oct 2014 21:09:50 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=108172

Ben Hoffman had a breakthrough race to finish second. Photo: John David Becer

Americans Ben Hoffman and Andy Potts both pulled off top-five finishes at the 2014 Ironman World Championship.

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Ben Hoffman had a breakthrough race to finish second. Photo: John David Becer

On a day at the Ironman World Championship when 16 out of the event’s 52 pro male starters were unable to finish the race, the accomplishments of those that triumphed are especially impressive. Not only is it athletic talent and training discipline that enables certain athletes to persevere and reach the podium–strategic approach and mental attitude are equally important. At the post-race press conference in Kona, the two top-performing Americans–Ben Hoffman who finished second and Andy Potts who finished fourth, the first American men to grace the Ironman World Championship podium since Chris Lieto’s second place in 2009–shared some insight into what made their days successful.

RELATED – Analysis: Ben Hoffman’s Kona Power File

A trio of important lessons can be learned from Hoffman’s comments:

  • Race your own race
  • Take calculated risks
  • Be prepared to push

Here’s what Hoffman had to say:

“To think that I could have gone with Sebastian [Kienle] would be naïve. He was riding very well today. I had a plan coming into this race. The logical step for me I thought would be to go to the top 10 this year, and I felt I had that fitness and ability and the mental strength as well. I did roll the dice a little bit, actually, on the way up to Hawi. I saw a few opportunities and I took them. I did ride with Frederik [Van Lierde], which I thought was a smart move. He’s very steady and solid and I felt good at that time so I took that opportunity. But especially on the marathon I did my own race. I tried not to ever panic or do anything that wasn’t part of my plan and in the end it turned out really well. I think in Hawaii you have to be smart and you have to do your best race. And then occasionally it comes down to racing. [Jan] Frodeno was closing on me at the end. I probably would have slowed down a bit but you have to race, especially when you’re up front like that.”

And from Andy Potts, grateful to compete after having to withdraw last minute in 2013 due to an injury, another valuable lesson:

  • A positive perspective pays off

Potts shared the following:

“Last year the opportunity to perform was not in the cards for me. I was very appreciative to be here and to be healthy this year, to show thanks and to show appreciation and to have an opportunity. That’s really all us athletes want–to have a chance to show our good days. I was appreciative to be out there on the Queen K all day. I wasn’t exactly happy, but I was very appreciative!”

RELATED PHOTOS: 2014 Kona Men’s Race

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Kona 2014: Behind The Races That Didn’t Go To Plan http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/ironman/kona-behind-races-didnt-go-plan_108120 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/ironman/kona-behind-races-didnt-go-plan_108120#comments Thu, 16 Oct 2014 17:26:34 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=108120

Frederik Van Lierde couldn't replicate his 2013 performance. Photo: John David Becker

A recap of some of the pro races that didn’t go as expected.

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Frederik Van Lierde couldn't replicate his 2013 performance. Photo: John David Becker


Every year, the Kona course offers varying degrees of choppy waters, blistering heat, heavy humidity and intense winds that cause even the most well-prepared and mentally strong athletes to crumble. There’s a reason the world championship is held here—it’s certainly not an easy place to compete.

This year was no exception, with 16 DNFs in the pro men’s field and four in the pro women’s field. According to Raymond Britt at Runtri.com, overall there was a 6 percent DNF rate this year, compared to a similar year in 2012 when 4.9 percent of the field did not finish (comparable because 11:35 was the average finish time in 2014; it was 11:32 in 2012). In 2013, bike splits were 20–25 minutes faster than average, showing that last year had likely “easier” conditions than 2014.

In addition to the athletes who decided to pull the plug when things went south, there were others who battled through issues just to cross the line, even if it meant getting there an hour slower than normal. Here’s a recap of some of the races that didn’t go as expected.

The Men

Frederik Van Lierde (BEL)
Eighth place, 8:24:11

The defending champion still posted a solid top-10 result, but would’ve preferred to be on top of the podium again this year. He was in the front pack of the swim and positioned himself well on the bike to come into T2 in fourth, but he battled side stiches on the run to finish eighth. In a recap sent out after the race, Van Lierde said this: “On the bike I felt strong from the beginning but I also wanted to save some energy for the second part. But when the later winner, Seb Kienle came over our leading group after 70km, the whole game changed. All out from then on, in very windy conditions and the field was blown apart. … I ran really good and till 30km I felt really strong and I was in 2nd position. For some reason (have to find out why later), when I came out of Energy Lab, I had painful stitches in my right side. 3km I suffered walked, ran, walked before it started to get better … That’s it for now, rest and recovery time now!”

Luke McKenzie (AUS)
15th place, 8:38:12

His day didn’t start in the usual front swim pack and he didn’t make up enough ground to get back to last year’s spot on the podium, but with a year of tough races (and having a baby four months ago!), he sounds ready to vie for his top spot again in 2015. “Not my day but proud of a hard fought 15th place,” McKenzie said on Twitter. “I will be back.”

Ivan Raña (ESP)
17th place, 8:38:59

The Spaniard had a slower swim and bike than usual, and even his race-fastest 2:44 marathon couldn’t quite make up enough time. In a message after the race, Raña said, “It was tough, for a lot of people. I felt really bad in the swim and on the bike. I felt like sleeping. Same feeling when I have a big rest.”

Tim O’Donnell (USA)
32nd place, 9:25:13

Last year’s top American started out in the front swim pack but began to feel iffy on the bike and dealt with a host of issues throughout the race. Afterwards he tweeted, “Humbling day here in Kona. Lots of small things going wrong led 2 whole thing going really wrong. Thanks 2 all who cheered me on regardless.” O’Donnell’s wife, now three-time Ironman World Champion Mirinda Carfrae, said she saw him in the Energy Lab on the run and he told her, “You’re racing for both of us now!” He still got himself across the line with a 3:52 marathon.

Marino Vanhoenacker (BEL)
34th pro (353rd overall), 9:55:19

In 2012, Vanhoenacker had a meltdown that resulted in a DNF; this time he was third off the bike, but suffered during the run. He made it to the finish after a lot of walking during the marathon. In an interview with Triathlete.com after the race, he said, “It was a hard day and a really long run/walk at the end. There’s nothing much to tell about it. I just wanted to finish because I’m not coming back here, so I had to finish this story. I’m done with this race. I’ve tried enough. I don’t want to go through this again.”

Andrew Starykowicz (USA)
DNF

The 2013 bike leader was expected to take charge again, but he said afterwards he wasn’t quite prepared for the race and started walking in mile 1 of the marathon before he dropped out. Post-race via Twitter: “Thanks 4 all the support. I missed 70.3Worlds bc I was on crutches, & I thought I was healthy enough to give it 100%. Thanks again”

Eneko Llanos (ESP)
DNF

Llanos cited a cold that held him back. From Facebook, “I was hoping to be recovered from the cold for the race but unfortunately it didn’t happen. I wasn’t too bad but not strong enough. Survived the swim and the bike, hoping to do a good run but couldn’t find any strength. I decided too quit, I didn’t have much power to keep going and I didn’t want to risk my health any more. Another bad year in Kona but we will keep fighting. Thank you everybody for your support!”

Terenzo Bozzone (NZL)
DNF

Bozzone didn’t have the day he wanted, but congratulated his fellow competitors who hung tough all day. Afterwards he said on Facebook: “It wasn’t my day today and unfortunately I had to pull the pin at 120km. I am grateful for all the support and well wishes, thanks everyone for the encouragement.”

Bevan Docherty (NZL)
DNF

The Kiwi dropped out early in the race, and tweeted this afterwards: “Very disappointin day, I just had nothin in my legs & no excuses or reasons why. Thanks 2 every1 behind me I wish I could have performed 4 u.”

Pete Jacobs (AUS)
DNF

The 2012 champion was into T1 in the top 5, but decided to call it quits when he realized he would be reduced to a walk/run, and plans to focus on Challenge Bahrain in December. On Twitter, Jacobs said, “For my physical and mental health, my future, my income, I couldn’t run/walk today when not 100%. Doing that twice this year was enough.”

In an interview with Triathlete.com, he explained, “I was riding pretty well, but I started to fall back around the 40-mile mark. I thought ‘well I’m still going OK’ but once we went past Kuhawaiai and the rollers, I just sort of went further and further and slower and slower. … I haven’t had the perfect build-up. It has been far from the perfect year. … In the back of my mind I knew that I didn’t have a great feeling about this race.”

Tyler Butterfield (BMU)
DNF

A top 10 finish couldn’t be replicated this year; Butterfield said lower back pain took him out of the race. From Twitter: “The things I thought might b weaknesses, were. & today I was found out. Unhappy 2 have 2 pull out w/ lower back pain. Now to watch to show.” … “Thank you to all that supported me this year. The pursuit of perfection had its cost. Last year was 2 steps 4ward, this year 1 step back!”

TJ Tollakson (USA)
DNF

Tollakson ran until the turnaround point on Ali’I Drive until he decided to pull the plug ultimately because of a plaguing back/nerve issue. “I jogged back to transition to turn in my chip, but I quit racing at the turnaround, and made up my mind to retire from the race,” he said. “The day before the race, I was bent over adjusting my rear derailleur when my back gave out (muscle spasm). I’ve dealt with two bulging discs in my back for years, and undergo a lot of treatment and a demanding strength and conditioning program to keep my back from causing me problems. I brushed it off on Friday and went for a short ride and felt great and used my Compex to help relax my muscles.” His back started acting up on the swim, and once in the aerobars, the nerve pain down his right side prohibited him from putting out the power he wanted to. “I had a lot of confidence in my run so I thought after riding very easy for 112 miles, I could have one of my best runs. My back pain was intense on the run, sending shooting nerve pain down my right leg with every right foot strike. I told myself it would get better and after a few miles I wouldn’t even notice the pain. Contrary to my wishes, the pain just got worse the longer I ran, so I decided to shut it down and call it a day in hopes that I would minimize the damages and not make the problem worse.”

Other top contenders such as James Cunnama and Faris Al-Sultan also had DNFs but we do not have the details on their races.

 

RELATED PHOTOS – 2014 Ironman World Championship: Men’s Race

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Michellie Jones Inducted Into Sport Australia Hall Of Fame http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/news/michellie-jones-inducted-sport-australia-hall-fame_108164 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/news/michellie-jones-inducted-sport-australia-hall-fame_108164#comments Thu, 16 Oct 2014 17:03:50 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=108164

Olympic silver medalist and Ironman world champion Michellie Jones was inducted into the Australian Triathlon Hall of Fame in Melbourne on

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Olympic silver medalist and Ironman world champion Michellie Jones was inducted into the Australian Triathlon Hall of Fame in Melbourne on Thursday.

“It’s definitely an honor to be considered for induction,” Jones said in a statement about the induction. “It’s a great reminder of all the achievements in your sport. To actually be inducted will be extra icing on the cake on my sporting career.”

“I have been very blessed to be able achieve so much in the sport of triathlon,” she continued. “The sport of triathlon not only has defined me in my sporting life but also well beyond the playing field. Triathlon is a big part of who I am and it’s like family having raced 25 years as a professional. I hope I have inspired others to believe that anything is possible no matter how unreachable it may seem.”

The Sport Australia Hall of Fame selection committee had no doubts about Jones’ special contribution to triathlon and Australian sport in general.

“Michellie Jones took Australian women’s triathlon to new heights, dominating the world from 1991 to 2003 in the hugely popular Olympic distance triathlon. Not satisfied, she then moved up to the full ironman, winning the legendary Kona Hawaiian Ironman in 2006,” Chair Robert de Castella said.

Recap Jones’ career with this excerpt from our Top 25 Greatest Female Triathletes Of All Time list, which put Jones at No. 3.

Has anyone had a career with as much sustained excellence over so many different distances as Australia’s Michellie Jones? It’s doubtful.

Let’s start with her wins at the classic races like St. Anthony’s (seven), Escape from Alcatraz (eight) and Chicago (seven). Then, when triathlon became an Olympic sport and drafting was legalized, Jones became a quick study and won two ITU World Cup titles, two ITU World Championships and a total of eight medals at the ITU World Championships.

She even won the XTERRA World Championship, proving that she could also handle a mountain bike.

In 2000, in front of the home crowd in Sydney, Australia, she won the silver medal in the first ever Olympic triathlon, losing the gold in a sprint finish to Switzerland’s Brigitte McMahon, who five years later tested positive for performance-enhancing drugs.

Jones stepped up to the full distance and earned three Ironman victories including the 2006 Ironman World Championship title.

To this day, she is the only triathlete, male or female, to have an Olympic medal and an Ironman world championship title.

RELATED PHOTOS: Images Of A Training Day With Michellie Jones

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Emotional Marino Vanhoenacker Says He’s Done With Kona http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/video/emotional-marino-vanhoenacker-says-hes-done-kona_108161 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/video/emotional-marino-vanhoenacker-says-hes-done-kona_108161#comments Thu, 16 Oct 2014 13:48:47 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=108161

After a frustrating day at the 2014 race Vanhoenacker says he's done trying to reach the top of the podium in Kona.

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Belgium’s Marino Vanhoenacker has come close to victory at the Ironman World Championship in the past, but after a frustrating day at the 2014 race he says he’s done trying to reach the top of the podium in Kona. Our post-race interview with the current Ironman record holder.

RELATED – Tri House Hangout: Marino Vanhoenacker

More from Kona.

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In Defense Of Swim Drills http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/training/defense-swim-drills_108158 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/training/defense-swim-drills_108158#comments Thu, 16 Oct 2014 13:36:42 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=108158

Photo: John David Becker

Working hard but not getting faster? Three reasons technique trumps fitness when it comes to improving your stroke.

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Photo: John David Becker

Working hard but not getting faster? Three reasons technique trumps fitness when it comes to improving your stroke.

With the limited hours you have to dedicate to improving swim speed each week, you might think every second should be devoted to building yardage in the pool. To those with this mindset, drills are a waste of time. Of course fitness is important, but good form is even more essential. Swimming may be the most technique-sensitive sport, and the water shows no mercy for those with bad technique.

Using good technique is neither intuitive nor obvious. Getting to the anatomical positions that enable us to swim fast requires some extraordinary flexibility, strength in muscles that may not be used very often, extra work getting to those positions and fitness to sustain those motions or positions. Thankfully, all of those things can be accomplished by slowing down the stroke and focusing on technique. Have an experienced coach look at your stroke and identify the problems—there are always some—and then incorporate the appropriate drills to fix them.

RELATED: Why It’s Important To Conquer The Swim Kick

Specifically, drill work will do the following for your stroke:

Isolate the problem
There are simply too many complex movements in freestyle to enable one to think about one single movement or position of the body. For example, one of the best ways to learn to pull with a high elbow underwater (early vertical forearm position) is by doing One-arm Drill: Hold one arm in front, swim with one arm only, rotating from side to stomach, but focusing on the high elbow position as the single arm pulls through. It is much easier to grasp the concept swimming with high elbows after practicing with a single arm.

RELATED: Pick The Swim Drill For Your Weakness

Correct the problem
Once you discover you have poor technique in one aspect of the stroke, it can be a challenge not to revert to bad habits, especially when tired. A good example is head position. Most swimmers hold their head too high, causing more frontal drag. The best way to correct this problem is by doing 25 drill, sculling with the hands above the head in front, chin nearly on your chest, followed by 25 freestyle swim with the head in the same down position. Doing a swim after any drill will reinforce the correct habit and help you to practice the correct swimming technique.

RELATED: Spice Up Your Swim Drills

Keep the problem corrected
While getting fit is important in order to swim fast, spending a few minutes at the beginning of each practice working on specific drills to help your weak points will help you become a better swimmer. Or devote one extra 45-minute practice per week to a drill-focused session in order to get faster and more efficient. Correct technique requires that you not only know what to do, but that you build the stamina required to keep using the good technique throughout your swim. Some drills can help with both. One of my favorite workout sets is doing 10×25 High-elbow Sculls with fins as fast as you can and with short rest. This drill is for more advanced swimmers and is difficult, but helps you build the strength and stamina to set up the correct underwater pull and to maintain it.

RELATED: A Better Way To Breathe?

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