Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com Triathlon Training, Gear, Nutrition, Photos, Race Results & Calendars Sun, 29 Mar 2015 02:52:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0.1 Gwen Jorgensen Runs To 7th Straight WTS Win In Auckland http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/news/gwen-jorgensen-runs-to-7th-straight-wts-win-in-auckland_114261 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/news/gwen-jorgensen-runs-to-7th-straight-wts-win-in-auckland_114261#comments Sun, 29 Mar 2015 02:52:45 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=114261

Gwen Jorgensen continued her ITU dominance today at the ITU World Triathlon Series Auckland race.

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Gwen Jorgensen continued her ITU dominance today at the ITU World Triathlon Series Auckland race.

American Gwen Jorgensen emerged from the swim about 40 seconds down from the leaders and became a part of the main chase group. Sweden’s Lisa Norden, the 2012 Olympic silver medalist, pulled the group up to the leaders. Jorgensen started the run with the front pack and dominated the 10K in 34:10 to claim her seventh-straight (and 10th overall) WTS victory. American Katie Zaferes earned her second-straight silver medal in the WTS. New Zealand’s Andrea Hewitt rounded out the podium.

Check back for a complete race recap.

2015 ITU World Triathlon Series Auckland
Auckland, New Zealand – March 28, 2015
1.5K swim, 40K bike, 10K run

1 Gwen Jorgensen USA 2:09:04
2 Katie Zaferes USA 2:10:42
3 Andrea Hewitt NZL 2:10:58
4 Vendula Frintova CZE 2:11:23
5 Lisa Perterer AUT 2:11:40
6 Emma Moffatt AUS 2:11:43
7 Yuka Sato JPN 2:12:02
8 Sarah True USA 2:12:22
9 Sarah-anne Brault CAN 2:12:35
10 Simone Ackermann NZL 2:12:57

Complete results.

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Photos: 2015 Ironman 70.3 California http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/photos/photos-2015-ironman-70-3-california_114205 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/photos/photos-2015-ironman-70-3-california_114205#comments Sun, 29 Mar 2015 01:19:07 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=114205

Jan Frodeno and Heather Jackson claimed the Oceanside victories.

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Photos: John David Becker

RELATED: Frodeno, Jackson Grab Second 70.3 California Titles

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Frodeno, Jackson Grab Second 70.3 California Titles http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/news/frodeno-jackson-grab-second-70-3-california-titles_114196 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/news/frodeno-jackson-grab-second-70-3-california-titles_114196#comments Sat, 28 Mar 2015 20:16:18 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=114196

Frodeno take the win for the second year in a row. Photo: John David Becker

Germany's Jan Frodeno and the United States' Heather Jackson earned the wins against tough pro fields today in Oceanside.

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Frodeno take the win for the second year in a row. Photo: John David Becker

On a foggy morning that turned into a typical beautiful sunny day in Oceanside, it was two past course champions who took the wins today at the competitive Ironman 70.3 California—Germany’s Jan Frodeno with a repeat of last year’s win, and the 2013 champion, American Heather Jackson.

Men’s Race

Accompanied at the start by a pack of sea lions in unusually warmer water temps (67 degrees versus the typical mid-50s), Andy Potts (USA) emerged from the harbor first in 22:44, followed closely by Frederic Belaubre (FRA) and defending champion and 2008 Olympic gold medalist Jan Frodeno (GER).

Frodeno and Potts split up the work leading the race with Balaubre and Brent McMahon (CAN) close behind until Maik Twelsiak (GER) attacked on a climb around mile 30 to build a small gap. Coming out of T1 over four minutes back was Canada’s Lionel Sanders, a proven bike-run threat, who started making up minutes fast in the chase pack. By mile 50, he took the lead from Twelsiak and finished the bike first, with a race-fastest 2:04:46 split. The group out of T2 was packed with five guys—Sanders, Twelsiek, Frodeno, McMahon, Potts and Jesse Thomas (USA)—all within 20 seconds of each other.

Out onto the run, Sanders and Frodeno—who both have stellar, consistent half marathon splits in the low 1:1Xs—ran shoulder-to-shoulder until Frodeno started to open up his gap to more than 30 seconds on the Canadian at the halfway mark. Frodeno kept his lead with a 1:10:48 run split as Potts, a five-time Oceanside winner, chipped away to pass Sanders for second place. Sanders finished third, followed by McMahon and Thomas.

 

Women’s Race

Last year’s Heather (Jackson) vs. Heather (Wurtele) battle turned out with a Wurtele win over Jackson, but Jackson reclaimed her Oceanside crown today with a 4:14:47 victory.

Out of the swim first was American Jennifer Spieldenner in 24:51, followed by Holly Lawrence (GBR) and Alicia Kaye (USA), with six more women within a minute of each other into T1. Last year’s champion Wurtele exited 1:49 down, while Jackson was 2:17 back on the swim leaders.

Lawrence, who trains with Matt Dixon of PurplePatch Fitness but is relatively unknown to the crowd or the rest of the pro women (somewhat enhanced by not having her race kit yet and racing in all black), pushed the pace at the front of the bike the entire ride. Magali Tisseyre (CAN), fresh off a recent win at Ironman 70.3 Monterrey, stayed within striking distance of Lawrence until a mechanical took her out of the race around mile 30. Also chasing closely was short-course-turned-70.3 athlete Alicia Kaye (USA) as well as Angela Naeth (CAN), Laurel Wassner (USA), Jackson and Wurtele.

Lawrence was off the bike first with about three minutes on her chasers, but the Heathers were both on a mission to close the gap, getting it to under a minute by the halfway point. Jackson, who suffered a stress fracture that interrupted a lot of her 2014 season, was elated and emotional at the finish line when her 1:22:22 run split took her into first place. Wurtele followed in second with a 4:16:07 finish and Lawrence held on for third in 4:16:59. Kaye and Naeth came in fourth and fifth, respectively.

2015 Ironman 70.3 California
Oceanside, Calif. – March 28, 2015
1.2-mile swim, 56-mile bike, 13.1-mile run

Men
1. Jan Frodeno (GER) 3:47:08
2. Andy Potts (USA) 3:48:43
3. Lionel Sanders (CAN) 3:49:19
4. Brent McMahon (CAN) 3:51:07
5. Jesse Thomas (USA) 3:52:52

Women
1. Heather Jackson (USA) 4:14:47
2. Heather Wurtele (CAN) 4:16:07
3. Holly Lawrence (GBR) 4:16:59
4. Alicia Kaye (GBR) 4:20:01
5. Angela Naeth (CAN) 4:21:33

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Video: Andy Potts Going After 6th 70.3 California Win http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/video/video-andy-potts-going-after-6th-70-3-california-title_114192 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/video/video-andy-potts-going-after-6th-70-3-california-title_114192#comments Fri, 27 Mar 2015 23:24:54 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=114192

American Andy Potts chats about the Ironman 70.3 California course and what it will take to reclaim the title.

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American Andy Potts chats about the Ironman 70.3 California course and what it will take to reclaim the title. The former Olympian also shares how he spends the last 24 hours before a race.

See the Ironman 70.3 California start list.

RELATED: Andy Potts’ Cold-Water Swim Tips

 

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Brett Sutton Explains The Chopping Board Paddles http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/training/brett-sutton-explains-the-chopping-board-paddles_114179 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/training/brett-sutton-explains-the-chopping-board-paddles_114179#comments Fri, 27 Mar 2015 20:58:11 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=114179

Nicola Spirig with her chopping board paddles, which outperform all rivals in trying to model the same position in the water. Photo: Trisutto.com

Triathlon coach Brett Sutton explains the use of the non-traditional "chopping board paddles."

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Nicola Spirig with her chopping board paddles, which outperform all rivals in trying to model the same position in the water. Photo: Trisutto.com

Triathlon coach Brett Sutton explains the use of the non-traditional “chopping board paddles.” This article originally appeared at Trisutto.com.

The humble chopping board has long taken pride of place in the swim toolkit of many successful swimmers. They are used specifically in improving our athletes who use a two-beat kick, bilateral breathing technique.

The absolute relevance of these paddles doesn’t come from my imagination, but from countless hours spent watching films of swimmers taken at the Valley Pool so many years ago. The pool had an underwater window where athletes were filmed using every type of swim equipment, noting every variant that came from a certain paddle or flipper (or fins for US readers).

The difference to stroke that a simple, small differential on a paddle would make was enormous. Just as different flipper brands would completely change a kick pattern without any noticeable difference when viewing from deck side. Hours and hours were spent in “the hole” as we called it, going over every aspect of swim equipment usage.

Now back in the day (late 70s, early 80s) the swimming distance technique of choice was the Forbes Carlile ‘crawl’ motion of Jenny Turrell and Sally Lockyer. Both world record breaking swimmers, who were followed by the great Shane Gould ‎ who at one stage held every world record from 100m to 1500m freestyle.

This stroke is now hardly seen as it has severe speed limitations for women sprinting. But back then it was all the rage and bilateral breathing was the norm, unlike today. Yet with its faster turnover of stroke and two-beat kick it is still highly relevant to triathlon and open water swimming.

During this era, arm paddles were also the rage for training this square, front-on stroke. These were a part of a style keeping the body flat with no rolling, and press.

The arm paddles had their last champion in 1980. They were part of the kit of the great Rowdy Gaines, the American sprinter, who coincidentally held every short course collegiate distance record. Something now unheard of for an Olympic 100m sprinter. But Rowdy loved the these paddles even when they were being abandoned across world swimming.

The arm paddles of that era, like the ones resurfacing again now, see many shapes and sizes all trying to lock in the wrist and prevent dropped elbows.

Not a bad idea for age group swimmers one may think? Sometimes, but not always.

It depends on your stroke. If you breathe on one side or you six or four beat kick or cross over while kicking, then the arm paddles will prove very counter productive. So one needs to match the paddles to the specific stroke. When you see a photo of our squad at the pool, there will always be a vast array of different paddles in all shapes, sizes and configurations. This is not because everyone has bought them from different websites, but because all are being used for a specific stroke and purpose.

Thus with our changing of both Nicola Spirig and Daniela Ryf’s style to the two-beat bilateral breathing ‘back to the future’ stroke I have been searching the swim shops and the web for the arm paddles of choice.

Alas, none address the original fault we found originally with the ‘shut fist’ or arm paddle as it enters the water:

The initial 2-4cm can produce slippage until the force of the press is applied, creating a little balance issue. Not a big issue I grant you, but it used to annoy me no end back then and continues to annoy me now.

The solution back in my swimming days was found in a most peculiar way. My mum was holding the chopping board in the sink, moving it backwards and forwards in the washing up water. I said ‘what are you doing?’ To which she explained ‘getting the garlic crush out of the dimples of the board.’

So simple, yet when I went and bought two of these light plastic chopping blocks with the hole cut out for gripping, much to my surprise it gripped the water as soon as the pressure of the press was applied.

As you can see from Nicola’s picture the board even has a small paddle groove around the fingers like a knuckle duster. This lip catches the water instantly and takes away the slippage because of the small surface area of the fist.

So whenever I have had a swimmer that uses the the two-beat bilateral breathing technique, then the chopping boards are brought straight out. The dropped wrist or elbow can’t function with the arm paddle on, so it makes the wrist and forearm act as an oar. Much more effective.

Please don’t write in to me about modern biomechanics that have made this stroke obsolete and why it doesn’t workunless you have trained four female athletes to swim 8:32 or better for long course 800m. They all used to carry arm paddles in their tool kit and used them at least 2,000m per day. Neither did any take less than 50 strokes for every 50m.

RELATED: Brett Sutton’s Take On The Racing Weight Debate

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2015 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide: Nutrition http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/nutrition/2015-triathlete-buyers-guide-nutrition-2_114188 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/nutrition/2015-triathlete-buyers-guide-nutrition-2_114188#comments Fri, 27 Mar 2015 20:39:54 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=114188

See the nine nutrition products reviewed in the 2015 Triathlete Buyer's Guide.

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Ironman African Championship Set For Sunday http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/news/2015-ironman-african-championship-pro-starting-list_114183 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/news/2015-ironman-african-championship-pro-starting-list_114183#comments Fri, 27 Mar 2015 20:29:33 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=114183

Frederik Van Lierde will compete Sunday in South Africa. Photo: John David Becker

The second championship-level Ironman event of the year will take place this weekend in Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa.

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Frederik Van Lierde will compete Sunday in South Africa. Photo: John David Becker

The second championship-level Ironman event of the year will take place this weekend in Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa. The Ironman African Championship will offer a $150,000 prize purse and a slew of Kona Pro Ranking (KPR) points. It will also award each of the winners automatic entry into this fall’s Ironman World Championship.

With defending champion Nils Frommhold (GER) choosing to compete at last weekend’s Melbourne event, there will be a new winner for 2015. 2013 Ironman world champion Frederik Van Lierde (BEL) highlights the start list. If he finishes the race, he’ll validate his Kona start. His top competition will likely come from Cyril Viennot (FRA), Bart Aernouts (BEL), Kyle Buckingham (RSA), James Cunnama (RSA), Victor Del Corral (ESP), Eneko Llanos (ESP), TJ Tollakson (USA) and Sylvain Sudrie (FRA).

In the women’s race, Jodie Swallow (GBR) is the favorite to grab the title. Like the men, the women’s field is very deep with several women who could win. Look for strong performances from Camilla Pedersen (DEN), Linsey Corbin (USA), Lucie Reed (CZE), Diana Riesler (GER), Caitlin Snow (USA) and Sonja Tajsich (GER).

With so much on the line, don’t be surprised to see a lesser-known name show up in top shape and steal a spot on the podium or the win. See the start lists below.

RELATED: Ironman Announces Redistribution of Prize Purse Money for 2015

Men’s Start List
1 Cyril Viennot (FRA)
2 Frederik Van Lierde (BEL)
3 Bart Aernouts (BEL)
5 Kyle Buckingham (RSA)
6 Bas Diederen (NED)
7 Matt Trautman (RSA)
8 Johann Ackermann (GER)
9 Mike Aigroz (SUI)
10 Konstantin Bachor (GER)
12 Gerhard DeBruin (RSA)
13 Fraser Cartmell (GBR)
14 Alberto Casadei (ITA)
17 Greg Close (USA)
18 James Cunnama (RSA)
19 Karl-Johan Danielsson (SWE)
20 Michael Davidson (RSA)
21 Victor Del Corral (ESP)
22 Trevor Delsaut (FRA)
23 Marc Deulsen (GER)
25 Herve Faure (FRA)
26 Frederik Flagstad (DEN)
27 Hannes Cool (BEL)
28 Kent Horner (RSA)
29 Allan Hovda (NOR)
31 Kirill Kotsegarov (EST)
32 Roman Roman Krutina (CZE)
33 Eneko Llanos (ESP)
34 Carlos Lopez Diaz (ESP)
35 Jim Lubinsky (USA)
36 David McNamee (GBR)
37 Joannes Moldan (GER)
39 David Plese (SLO)
40 Ivan Rana (ESP)
41 Michael Reunz (GER)
42 Till Schramm (GER)
43 Boris Stein (GER)
44 Sylvain Sudrie (FRA)
46 TJ Tollakson (USA)
47 Craig Twigg (GBR)
48 Urs Muller (SUI)
49 Hendrik-Jan Verhaegen (BEL)
50 Andrej Vistica (CRO)

Women’s Start List
51 Jodie Swallow (GBR)
38 Camilla Pedersen (DEN)
52 Linsey Corbin (USA)
54 Lucy Gossage (GBR)
55 Stefanie Adam (BEL)
56 Anne Basso (FRA)
59 Susie Cheetham (GBR)
60 Tine Deckers (BEL)
61 Amber Ferreira (USA)
63 Astrid Ganzow (GER)
64 Alyssa Godesky (USA)
65 Eleanor Haresign (GBR)
66 Corina Hengartner (SUI)
67 Jessica Jones Meyers (USA)
69 Heather Leiggi (USA)
70 Maria Lemeseva (RUS)
71 Caroline Livesey (GBR)
72 Britta Martin (NZL)
73 Nina Pekerman (ISR)
74 Lucie Reed (CZE)
75 Diana Riesler (GER)
76 Riana Robertson (RSA)
78 Caitlin Snow (USA)
79 Sonja Tajsich (GER)
81 Eva Wutti (AUT)

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Racing Israel’s Israman Triathlon http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/features/racing-israels-israman-triathlon_114168 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/features/racing-israels-israman-triathlon_114168#comments Fri, 27 Mar 2015 20:09:21 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=114168

Erin Beresini on the Israman bike course. Photo: Larry Rosa

Triathlete.com contributor Erin Beresini competed on a tough course along the Israeli-Egyptian border.

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Erin Beresini on the Israman bike course. Photo: Larry Rosa

Triathlete.com contributor Erin Beresini competed on a tough course along the Israeli-Egyptian border.

I was afraid to go to Israel. The New Jersey-sized country is one of the most contentious on earth. It didn’t help that a few days before hopping on the 10-hour flight from New York to Tel Aviv, I read this headline: Palestinian man stabs people on Tel Aviv rush-hour bus. But I was invited to race Israman, a one-day event held at the southernmost tip of Israel that features both half and full iron-distance races, and relays of both distances. I was not going to miss an opportunity to compete on the other side of the world.

But first there was the business of getting there. Based on American news alone, I was convinced that a land-to-air missile shot from the Gaza strip would knock my plane out of the sky before it landed. And if that didn’t happen, someone would kidnap me when they found out I am a journalist. “But I only write about bikes!” I’d argue to no avail. I even Facebook messaged an Israeli friend to ask what I should wear because I wanted to blend in as much as possible. “people over there wear sheepskin, got any?” he wrote back. Translation: It’s just like here—you’re being insane.

He was right. It’s impossible to write or speak about Israel without politics (and Israelis will happily engage you in a political conversation) but I’m going to try from here on out.

The country of about eight million people is a modern, Westernized state in the middle of the Middle East. It is very easy for Americans to get around; nearly everyone speaks English, there are several English-speaking TV channels, and all of the road signs (people drive on the right) are written in Hebrew, Arabic and English. There are, I must note, a lot more soldiers carrying automatic weapons in public places, some of whom are women who look like they’re all of 15 years old (though they must be at least 18 to start mandatory military training). But somehow their presence makes those places feel safer.

Why am I telling you all of this? Because no American goes all the way to Israel just to race, though the gorgeous, grueling Israman course alone is certainly worth the trip. You go for the experience that is being in Israel—the birthplace of so many religions, filled with history and ruins and amazing Mediterranean cuisine. Nobody ever talks about the cuisine, a tourism rep tells me, because that’s how all of the other Mediterranean countries advertise themselves. Instead, Israel likes to focus on what you can only access through Israel: the Holy Land. Old Jerusalem. The stations of the cross. The Western Wall.

So here’s what you do, intrepid traveling triathletes. You fly into Tel Aviv. Then, depending on how Type A you are, you either head straight to the race start in Red Sea resort town of Eilat (about a four drive through the Negev desert, or a one hour flight), then tour. Or you tour then race. Or tour, race, then tour some more. Because there’s no way you’re getting within 25 miles of the Dead Sea (the distance from Jerusalem) without floating in it and covering yourself in mineral-infused mud. Or without visiting Masada, ruins of an ancient fortress built atop a plateau in the middle of the desert that was conquered by Romans and immortalized in a 1981 Peter O’Toole movie.

But first (or second or last or whatever), you race. Because the race is the gateway drug to the rest of the country. It’s what gets you there. It’s what makes you think, Hey, I think I’d like to go to Israel, despite the never-ending barrage of bad news about the region in American media. It’s where you meet locals who view you as something other than a tourist, and it’ll bring you that sense of accomplishment that lets you chill out and enjoy the rest of the trip without worrying about getting in a workout.

And the race, oh the race! Somehow Israman has managed to combine the production value of an Ironman while retaining the home-grown feel of the now-defunct Silverman full, but with athletes from all over the world; the 2015 event hosted 1,630 triathletes from 26 nations.

With a bang, you’ll launch into the Red Sea to swim in clear, high 60s water. (This year, race cannon honors went to a 20-year old Israeli soldier who was gravely wounded in a fight with Hamas in Gaza City half a year earlier.) Then you will climb. A lot. About 2,600 feet straight out of town through a lunar-like landscape, with the enormous steel Israel-Egypt border fence gradually appearing to the left. If you can focus on anything other than the pain in your legs, you might notice a few spectating camels or border guards in roadside dugouts.

After that first ascent, the route doesn’t let up. Once you’re into the mountains, strong head and crosswinds will test your mettle, and the road continues to undulate for the rest of the ride. Choose your plan of attack wisely, because the point-to-point bike course dumps you near the top of the mountain you first climbed, and you’ll drop about 1,600 feet in the first five miles of the run. (The descent affords spectacular views of the Red Sea and enormous Jordanian mountains in the distance.) Attack too hard, and your quads might give up. Go too easy, and you may never see your competition again.

After descending to sea level from about 2,100 feet in the first eight miles of the run, a few out-and-backs will let you assess your competition. It’s all about who can hang on to the finish as you run down Eilat’s bike path and wind around the boardwalk back to the finish line, located in the middle of several resorts.

In the end, you will have climbed about 10,500 feet on the full bike course, 6,200 in the half—a true cyclist’s course. Time for one of those legendary Israeli buffets and a free post-race massage. And perhaps time for a Jeep tour, just in case you can’t walk.

As for my fear of traveling to Israel, what I learned is this: Israelis themselves refuse to live in fear. Israman is a testament to that. The triathlon is a non-partisan celebration of life and community despite the chaos that surrounds the small country. Should you, as a triathlete, want to travel to the Middle East, Israman should be on your radar for the beautiful challenge that it is.

Thinking about taking on Israman? Check out my itinerary:

Together with another journalist and longtime Triathlete contributing photographer, Larry Rosa, I started with two days in Jerusalem, touring the old city with a guide named Beni who made his American TV debut when he ushered Rick Steves around the country.

On day three, we all headed to the Dead Sea to float in the 30-percent mineral water (the regular ocean is about 3.5 percent salt) took a cable car up to the top of Masada to look out at the desert, Dead Sea, and ruins of the Roman camps that surround the plateau. Then we pulled into Eilat on a Wednesday night. The race is held on a Friday, as Israel operates on the Jewish calendar—Sunday through Thursday. Israel’s Friday is like our Saturday.

On Saturday, we headed out to the Makhtesh Ramon, a desert valley that looks a lot like a giant heart-shaped meteor crater, for a Jeep tour. Then late Saturday night, we pulled into Tel Aviv and spent Sunday touring Israel’s modern city, as well as the adjoining Jaffa port, a harbor that has been in use since the Bronze Age.

Hotels:
Jerusalem- The Dan Panorama Hotel
Eilat- The King Salomon Hotel
Tel Aviv- The Crowne Plaza

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Des Moines Triathlon Gets Key Sponsor http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/news/des-moines-triathlon-gets-key-sponsor_114177 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/news/des-moines-triathlon-gets-key-sponsor_114177#comments Fri, 27 Mar 2015 17:50:48 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=114177

The Hy-Vee Triathlon has a rich history of iconic race moments. Photo: Triathlon.org

The Des Moines Triathlon, formerly the Hy-Vee Triathlon, has announced that it has picked up a key sponsor.

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The Hy-Vee Triathlon has a rich history of iconic race moments. Photo: Triathlon.org

The Des Moines Triathlon, formerly the Hy-Vee Triathlon, has announced that it has picked up a key sponsor. Race organizers decided to continue the event after Hy-Vee announced earlier this year that it would no longer put on the iconic event. The Hy-Vee Triathlon was known for offering one of the richest prize purses in the sport. It’s unclear at this time if the Des Moines Triathlon will offer any kind of professional prize purse.

BMW of Des Moines announced Monday it will sponsor the 2015 Des Moines Triathlon.

General manager Craig Tjeerdsma said the company will be partnering with the Des Moines Triathlon and Premier Event Management as the Official Automobile Sponsor.

“We are more than excited and honored to be a part of such a great race and weekend of festivities,” Tjeerdsma said.

As a sponsor, BMW of Des Moines will provide BMW pace cars for the bicycle and road race parts of the event.

”Premier Event Management could not be more proud to have BMW of Des Moines as our Official Automobile Sponsor heading into our 2015 event,” race director Bill Burke said in a news release.

Read more: Kcci.com

RELATED PHOTOS: 2014 Hy-Vee 5150 U.S. Championship

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3 Workouts (Plus Essential Gear) For Bike Commuters http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/training/3-workouts-plus-essential-gear-for-bike-commuters_114170 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/training/3-workouts-plus-essential-gear-for-bike-commuters_114170#comments Fri, 27 Mar 2015 16:48:40 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=114170

Photo: iStock

For triathletes, it’s a way to kill two birds with one stone—get to work and get a workout.

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Photo: iStock


Fit in a workout (and up your happiness factor!) on your daily commute. 

Bike commutes offer a host of benefits: physical fitness, reduced impact on the environment, primo parking, and (in some cases) cash bonuses from employee wellness programs. Plus, a recent study out of Clemson University reveals happiness may be linked to the mode of transportation utilized to get to and from work. Those who commuted by bike were significantly more cheerful than those who drove cars or rode public transportation.

For triathletes, it’s a way to kill two birds with one stone—get to work and get a workout. Maximize your saddle time with these three workouts:

Traveling Technique
Use your short rides to and from work to focus on one element of cycling technique. Aim for a high cadence (90–100 RPM) and an even pedal stroke the entire way around, or work on your transitions from climbing in then out of the saddle.

Stoplight Intervals
After a 5–10-minute warm-up, insert short bursts of speed by riding hard from one stoplight to the next, followed by an easier recovery effort. If your ride offers long stretches of road without pause, mark your intervals with landmarks, such as light posts or mailboxes.

Big Ring for the Big Boss
Using a hard gear from a full stop builds leg strength and bike-handling skills. Set your chain in a harder gear before coming to a stop at a red light. When you get the green light, ride for 1 minute at a hard effort before dropping down to a more comfortable level.

RELATED: The Best Of 2014 Interbike

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Quick Set Friday: Flashes Of Fast http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/training/quick-set-friday-flashes-of-fast_76747 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/training/quick-set-friday-flashes-of-fast_76747#comments Fri, 27 Mar 2015 15:45:47 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=76747

Photo: Shutterstock.com

We’ll feature a swim workout every Friday from Sara McLarty so you have new ideas to take to the pool.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

Triathlete contributor and swimming all-star Sara McLarty has a blog with more than 500 creative workouts used in her Masters swim program in Clermont, Fla. We’ll feature a workout every Friday so you have new ideas to take to the pool. On her blog (Mastersswimworkoutsbysaramclarty.blogspot.com), you can pick a Monday set for a long distance focus, a Wednesday set for sprint training, or Friday for creative open water skills.

A:
4×200 w/ 20 sec rest (1 swim/1 pull, repeat)
8×75 on 1:15 (25 non-free/25 free/25 FAST!)
9×50 on 1:00 (1 FAST kick/2 choice drill)
5x[50 swim on :45 (FAST!)
50 kick on 1:00 (FAST!)
250 pull w/ 30 sec rest (easy)]
4×100 on 1:20 (pull, descend 1-4)
4×100 on 1:20 (swim, descend 1-4)
200 cool-down
*4600 total*

RELATED – Ask Coach Sara: Drills To Help With Open-Water Swimming

B:
4×200 w/ 20 sec rest (1 swim/1 pull, repeat)
6×75 on 1:45 (25 non-free/25 free/25 FAST!)
9×50 on 1:15 (1 FAST! kick/2 choice drill)
4x[50 swim on :55 (FAST!)
50 kick on 1:10 (FAST!)
200 pull w/ 30 sec rest (easy)]
3×100 on 1:50 (pull, descend 1-3)
3×100 on 1:50 (swim, descend 1-3)
200 cool-down
*3700 total*

RELATED – Ask Coach Sara: Overcoming Fear Of Jellyfish

C:
4×150 w/ 20 sec rest (1 Swim/1 Pull, repeat)
6×75 w/ 15 sec rest (25 non-free/25 free/25 FAST!)
3x[50 swim w/ 10 sec rest (FAST!)
50 kick w/ 10 sec rest (FAST!)
200 pull w/ 30 sec rest (easy)]
3×100 w/ 15 sec rest (pull, descend 1-3)
3×100 w/ 15 sec rest (swim, descend 1-3)
100 cool-down
*2600 total*

More “Quick Set Friday” workouts.

Follow Triathlete on Twitter @Triathletemag for inspiration, new workout ideas, gear reviews from our editors and more.

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Jorgensen Going For 10th WTS Win In Auckland http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/news/jorgensen-going-for-10th-wts-win-in-auckland_114164 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/news/jorgensen-going-for-10th-wts-win-in-auckland_114164#comments Thu, 26 Mar 2015 20:38:57 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=114164

Photo: Delly Carr/Triathlon.org

The ITU World Triathlon Series heads to Auckland this Sunday for the first standard-distance race of the year.

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Photo: Delly Carr/Triathlon.org

The ITU World Triathlon Series heads to Auckland this Sunday for the first standard-distance race of the year. The course takes place around Queens Wharf and features a two-lap (1.5km) swim, an eight-lap (40km) bike featuring three climbs per lap and a four-lap (10km) run. The notoriously difficult bike course paired with choppy conditions in the water usually can result in an exciting race for athletes and spectators alike. The opportunity for a WTS title, and the $150,000 worth of prize money has attracted some of the biggest names in the sport.

Women’s Race
Defending ITU world champion Gwen Jorgenson will race in Auckland after winning in the first WTS race of the season in Abu Dhabi. She will be attempting to reach her seventh-consecutive WTS victory and 10th career WTS win. Jorgensen has struggled in Auckland the last two years, with a DNF (2013) and a 12th-place finish (2014), and will likely be looking to prove that she can carry her dominance onto a tough bike course. Americans will be well represented in the women’s race, with Abu Dhabi top-10 finishers Katie Zaferes, Lindsey Jerdonek and Sarah True on the start list. Germany’s Anne Haug, a two-time gold medal winner in Auckland, will be toeing the line with company that includes New Zealand’s own Andrea Hewitt, Olympic silver medalist Lisa Norden (SWE) and XTERRA world champion Flora Duffy (BER). With so many strong cyclists, they will likely try to utilize the tough bike course to get away from faster runners, namely Jorgensen.

See the complete women’s start list.

Men’s Race
Spain’s heavy hitters will be in attendance this Sunday, with No. 1 ranked Mario Mola competing after a season-opening WTS win in Abu Dhabi. Javier Gomez Noya, the defending world champion and reigning WTS Auckland champion (since 2012) will be looking for his first WTS title of the season in Auckland. An impressive four of the six spaniards on the starting line are ranked in the top 10. Joe Maloy, the No. 2 ranked American in 2014, will lead the four U.S. men on Sunday at his first WTS race of the season. Great Britain’s Jonathan Brownlee and Portugal’s Joao Silva will also be vying for a podium finish.

See the complete men’s start list.

Watch the races
The races kick off at 7:50 pm ET on Saturday, March 28 and can been watched live on Triathlonlive.tv, and will be shown on Universal Sports Network from 4-9 p.m. ET on March 29.

RELATED PHOTOS: 2014 ITU WTS Auckland

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Deep Pro Field Racing Ironman 70.3 California http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/news/deep-pro-field-racing-ironman-70-3-california_114161 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/news/deep-pro-field-racing-ironman-70-3-california_114161#comments Thu, 26 Mar 2015 20:18:23 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=114161

Jan Frodeno is the defending champion. Photo: John David Becker

Several short-course pros will be stepping up to the half-Ironman distance this weekend in Oceanside.

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Jan Frodeno is the defending champion. Photo: John David Becker

With the loss of pro prize money in short-course non-drafting races, several short-course pros will be stepping up to the half-Ironman distance this weekend in Oceanside, making the early-season race’s start list even deeper. With former Oceanside winners, Olympians and world champions on the start list, Saturday’s race will be exciting and likely come down to the final miles. Pros will be competing for their share of a $60,000 prize purse.

Pro men’s race

In the men’s race, defending champion and 2008 Olympic gold medalist Jan Frodeno will face tough competition from American Andy Potts, who’s won five times in Oceanside. We haven’t seen Frodeno race yet this year, and he did have a bike crash in February, so it’ll be interesting to see if he’s in top form. We could see a stellar race from Potts, who had his top finish in Kona in 2014 with fourth place and a 2:48 marathon. He’s also won in sprint finishes a few times in Oceanside. Four-time Wildflower champ Jesse Thomas, who’s been bested in one of those sprint finishes, will be racing as well, but as we haven’t seen him race yet in 2015, we’re eager to see where his form is.

Outside of Frodeno, Potts and Thomas, there are a number of other men who could contend for the title including Brent McMahon (CAN), who recently set the Ironman Arizona course record in his IM debut, and Kevin Collington (USA), who’s had top 70.3 finishes in deep pro fields. There’s a long list of other podium contenders including Ronnie Schildknecht (SUI), Paul Matthews (AUS), Maik Twelsiek (GER), Leon Griffin (AUS), Matty Reed (USA), Lionel Sanders (CAN), Trevor Wurtele (CAN), Michael Weiss (AUT) and Matt Lieto (USA).

Pro women’s race

The women’s race appears wide open, with defending champion (and course record holder) Heather Wurtele, 2013 Oceanside champ Heather Jackson and the 2012 Oceanside winner and multiple XTERRA world champion Melanie McQuaid all on the start list. Wurtele and Jackson both had strong 2014 seasons, and the race could again become a showdown between the two Heathers.

However, we’re also eager to see how a number of half-Ironman specialists will fare on this course, including Canadians Angela Naeth and Magali Tisseyre (who recently won Ironman 70.3 Monterrey), Brit Emma-Kate Lidbury and American Sarah Piampiano. Ironman athletes Michelle Vesterby of Denmark, who’s had a top-10 Kona finish; American Liz Lyles, who was second at IM Frankfurt last year; and Aussie Carrie Lester, the 2013 Challenge Penticton champion, are all capable of a top finish.

We’re also interested to see how Life Time Tri Series champion Alicia Kaye will do—in a stacked Challenge Dubai field last month, she came in sixth. With the announcement of essentially the discontinuation of non-drafting short-course racing, she’s said that half-iron-distance racing has been changed from something she was dabbling in to her focus for the season. Other short-course stars who could do well are Rebeccah Wassner and Laurel Wassner.

RELATED PHOTOS: 2014 Ironman 70.3 California

Pro men:
Jan Frodeno (GER)
Andy Potts (USA)
Matt Reed (USA)
Jesse Thoma (USA)
Brent McMahon (CAN)
Ronnie Schildknecht (SUI)
Lionel Sanders (CAN)
Paul Matthews (AUS)
Trevor Wurtele (CAN)
Michael Weiss (AUT)
Christian Kemp (AUS)
David Kahn (USA)
Ben Collins (USA)
Andrew Yoder (USA)
Kevin Collington (USA)
Leon Griffin (AUS)
Chris Bagg (USA)
Chris Baird (USA)
Damon Barnett (USA)
Blake Becker (USA)
Frederic Belaubre (FRA)
Chris Berg (AUS)
Karl Bordine (USA)
Dylan Bridges-Oliva (USA)
Keith Butsko (USA)
Nicholas Chase (USA)
Matthew Curbeau (USA)
Scott DeFilippis (USA)
Guillaume Doree (FRA)
Nathan Dressel (USA)
Lewis Elliot (USA)
Matt Franklin (NZL)
Derek Garcia (USA)
Matt Hanson (USA)
Yu Hsiao (USA)
Tyler Jordan (USA)
Stephen Kilshaw (CAN)
Matt Lieto (USA)
Eric Reid (USA)
Taylor Reid (CAN)
Jonathan Shearon (USA)
Reilly Smith (USA)
Sean Sullivan (USA)
Joe Thorne (USA)
Dantley Young (USA)
Maik Twelsiek (GER)

Pro women:
Heather Wurtele (CAN)
Heather Jackson (USA)
Melanie McQuaid (CAN)
Angela Naeth (CAN)
Michelle Vesterby (DEN)
Jennifer Spieldenner (USA)
Emma-Kate Lidbury (GBR)
Liz Lyles (USA)
Carrie Lester (AUS)
Rebecca Preston (AUS)
Sarah Piampiano (USA)
Laura Siddall (GBR)
Rebeccah Wassner (USA)
Laurel Wassner (USA)
Alicia Kaye (USA)
Rachel McBride (CAN)
Holly Lawrence (GBR)
Kaitlin Anelauskas (USA)
Lauren Brandon (USA)
Katy Carguilo (USA)
Terry Casey (USA)
Emily Cocks (USA)
Alexandra Gordichuk (CAN)
Christina Jackson (USA)
Sarah Jarvis (GER)
Carly Johann (USA)
Tamara Kozulina (UKR)
Jocelyn McCauley (USA)
Amelia McCracken (USA)
Charlotte Morel (FRA)
Elizabeth Noey (USA)
Brittany Pierce (USA)
Magali Tisseyre (CAN)

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2015 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide: Best In Class http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/gear-tech/2015-triathlete-buyers-guide-best-in-class_114157 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/gear-tech/2015-triathlete-buyers-guide-best-in-class_114157#comments Thu, 26 Mar 2015 19:34:43 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=114157

Of the 184 triathlon products reviewed, 18 stood out against the rest for pure performance and earned the designation of Best in Class.

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Rest With A Clear Conscience http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/partnerconnect/rest-with-a-clear-conscience_114138 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/partnerconnect/rest-with-a-clear-conscience_114138#comments Thu, 26 Mar 2015 17:13:53 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=114138

Photo: John David Becker

Periods of rest are highly active phases during which the body builds itself up.

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Photo: John David Becker

The body is not idle during the recovery phase. On the contrary, periods of rest are highly active phases during which the body builds itself up.

Do your training partners or coach have to remind you to take a rest? Can you hardly bear to take a break from training and have a tendency to carry on without allowing enough time to rest?

Siri Lindley has earned a reputation as one of the sport’s top coaches and a real maker of champions. She confirmed the assumption many hold about top athletes, saying that all her athletes are very nervous about losing their fitness. “After three days of rest my athletes start to become worried about their skills,” Lindley says. “To convince them to take a rest costs more effort than pushing them through the session. You won’t believe it, but I also have to give them a program what to do [with their time], if they don’t train.”

Many amateur athletes have the exact same behavior patterns, fearing that time off will erode fitness while the competition uses that time to train harder and improve. These four principles explain why that isn’t true and why you can rest with a clear conscience.

Principle 1: The body is a system of intertwined feedback loops and interconnected circuits
The human body is obviously much more complicated than a simple balance (for a mental picture, think: the scales of justice) but many endurance athletes nevertheless fall into the trap of treating their bodies as such. More and more of a good thing (training) can turn really bad (fatigue, injury) because the training stimulus must be balanced by many processes going on in the body. The key to a balanced body is regulation.

Regulation is a complex phenomenona whole body statethat creates balance, oscillating between perfect balance and horrendous disintegration. It comprises the regulation of temperature, pH, blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen uptake, blood sugar and many, many more factors. Until today natural science has a hard time to tackle and investigate the various states of regulation and its dysfunction.

Principle 2: Training incurs inflammatory processes. Healing processes require recovery.
Endurance training creates micro-injuries in the muscles, ligaments, tendons and the smallest blood vessels. These tiny injuries are required in order for the muscle to adapt to a higher performance level. They can be so tiny that the athlete does not even notice them or so bad that long lasting muscle pains arise.

The reasons for these micro-injuries are not only due to mechanical forces but are also due to a rising and falling temperature in the tissue, disturbed blood flow, shifting of the pH, flooding with free oxygen radicals and/or missing energy supply and exploited buffer systems. They all influence the extent of the inevitable but necessary muscle injury.

All inflicted injuries lead to inflammatory processes in the body regardless of where they may be located. The inflammatory processes are the foundation for all healing and adaptation processes that finally bring about the training effect as desired.

Principle 3: The immune system steers the inflammatory and healing processes
The immune system is involved at all times. It initiates, spreads, controls and coordinates the inflammatory processes to bring forth healing. Any form of inflammation takes its toll, be it an injury or an infection, by consuming energy and consequently leading to a drop in performance. An intact immune system can heal micro-injuries within three to five days. If micro-injuries do not heal well due to a weakened immune system and insufficient recovery, then serious injuries to the muscle and connective tissue may follow.

Principle 4: Build-up processes only happen during recovery
Intensive training and racing throw the body into states of stress. Under these circumstances, the body is breaking itself down to supply the resources need to perform—carbohydrate and fat stores are used primarily and if absolutely necessary even muscle protein is broken down for fuel. Stress hormones increase and the inflammatory components of the immune system are activated.

Recovery is different. Build-up processes dominate. Now, energy is used and needed to create protein structures and the adaptation of the muscles to achieve a higher level of performance can begin. Muscle build-up only happens during recovery. Conditions within the cells change as well. The inflammatory stimuli are joined by metabolic stimuli. The cells and their environment are both highly active and protein synthesis runs at full speed, but only if you allow them to work by allowing the body to rest. This is the paradox of recovery: You may have a bad conscience when not training, but your body is working hard.

How to assess your need for recovery
Recovery is a very individual thing and finding the amount each individual needs takes a lot of experience. Even though science has tried to define parameters or body conditions such as heavy legs syndrome or heart rate the decision to carry on with the workouts is in the end primarily made by feel.

Pay attention to your quality of sleep, motivation, mood and emotional state, state of mind, extent and duration of fatigue, duration and extent of muscles soreness, appetite, craving for sweets, body weight and temperature sensation can help you to assess your general fitness and well-being. If you have problems to fall asleep or your sleep is fragmented, if you develop mood swings and you are emotionally imbalanced, if you lose the motivation for the training, if your appetite is not good, if you are excessively tired, if you have protracted muscle pain, if you lose body weight or you can’t lose weight despite the hard training or if you are highly sensitive to temperature changesyou are sweating when it’s cold or freezing when it’s warm), then it is high time to take a break from training.

In a condition of inflammation beestings (AKA colostrum) works as an anti-inflammatory agent and the growth factors it contains influence cellular regeneration. These factors foster muscle growth and the repair of the disrupted lining of the surfaces of the gut, the bronchi or the stomach.

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Three Swim Strength Training Exercises http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/training/swim-strength-training-exercises_72771 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/training/swim-strength-training-exercises_72771#comments Thu, 26 Mar 2015 17:00:58 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=72771

Functional exercises to strengthen your stroke this season.

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Functional exercises to strengthen your stroke this season.

Add these functional exercises to your pre-season routine to build stroke power and a strong core. Focus on good technique and proper body position. If you can only do two reps with perfect form, take a 20–30-second break, then try two more.

Plank Row

Grab a dumbbell in each hand in a plank position. Keep knees or feet hip-width apart for balance and stability. Lean body weight onto left arm and lift the right dumbbell off the floor. Use a “row” motion to pull dumbbell up to the side of your body. Do not rotate torso; keep chest facing the floor. Slowly lower dumbbell, transfer body weight, and repeat with the left arm.

Beginner: Legs bent, balance on knees

Advanced: Legs straight,
balance on toes

Reps: 10 rows each arm. Adjust weights as necessary to complete set with proper form

See a video demonstration of this exercise.

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Recipe Of The Week: Eggplant, Butternut Squash & Spinach Salad http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/nutrition/recipe-of-the-week-eggplant-butternut-squash-spinach-salad_114152 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/nutrition/recipe-of-the-week-eggplant-butternut-squash-spinach-salad_114152#comments Thu, 26 Mar 2015 16:46:04 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=114152

This salad supplies a large dose of Vitamins A, C, B and K, along with fiber and protein to keep you satisfied and recovered.

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There’s something special about a salad with creamy notes of roasted eggplant and butternut squash, combined with fresh bursts of tomato, crisp spinach and a pop of texture from quinoa. These ingredients also supply a large dose of Vitamins A, C, B and K, along with fiber and protein to keep you satisfied and recovered from hard training sessions.

Ingredients

5 ounce bag baby spinach
1 medium eggplant, diced into ½ inch cubes
1 small or ½ large butternut squash, diced into ½ inch cubes
1 ½ cups sugar snap peas, diced
1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved
½ red, yellow or orange pepper, finely diced
¼ red onion, thinly sliced
1 ½ cups cooked quinoa (recommend red or tri-color)
5 TBSP extra virgin olive oil
2 TBSP balsamic vinegar*
Freshly cracked sea salt and pepper

*Treat yourself to a high quality balsamic vinegar for extra tasty salad dressings

RELATED RECIPE: Stuffed Eggplant

Preparation

1. Heat oven to 450 degrees. Prepare two baking sheets with foil and nonstick cooking spray.
2. Spread the butternut squash on one sheet and the eggplant on another. Toss each with one tablespoon of the olive oil and a generous amount of salt and pepper.
3. Bake for 10 minutes, toss and bake another 5-10 minutes until the vegetables start to turn golden and soft. Remove from oven and let cool.
4. Once the eggplant and squash are cool, combine in a large salad bowl with all of the other vegetables, the quinoa, 3 TBSP olive oil, the balsamic vinegar, and season with salt and pepper. Serve immediately.

More recipes from Jessica Cerra.

Jessica Cerra is the owner of Fit Food by Jess, a private chef and catering company in Encinitas, Calif., and the co-founder of Harmony Bar. A former professional XTERRA triathlete, Cerra now races for Twenty16 Women’s Professional Cycling Team.

Get the latest in triathlon training, gear, nutrition and news sent straight to your inbox. Sign up for Triathlete’s newsletter.

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ProFile: Angela Naeth http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/features/profile-angela-naeth_114149 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/features/profile-angela-naeth_114149#comments Thu, 26 Mar 2015 13:25:05 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=114149

Angela Naeth in St. George, Utah. Photo: Nils Nilsen

A half-iron specialist, Naeth recently won her first Ironman (Chattanooga in 2014), and is structuring her 2015 season around a Kona bid.

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Angela Naeth in St. George, Utah. Photo: Nils Nilsen

Although she was a former track and field athlete before jumping into triathlon in 2007, Naeth, 32, has become best known for her strength as a cyclist. She has trained with some of the top coaches in the sport (previously Mark Allen and now Jesse Kropelnicki), amassing 10 Ironman 70.3 titles in a pro career that only became full time in 2010. A half-iron specialist, she recently won her first Ironman (Chattanooga in 2014), and is structuring her 2015 season around a Kona bid. She is originally from British Columbia, Canada, and now lives in Henderson, Nev., with her husband, Paul Duncan.

– When I was 10 years old I saw the Ironman on TV and remember it quite clearly. It inspired me, and it was always in the back of my mind. Living in Canada, we didn’t really have triathlon around at that time. It wasn’t until 2007 that I entered my first triathlon. It was an Olympic-distance indoor triathlon. It was a small race, only 400–500 people. I was 27. My mom and I drove five and a half hours to get there. I had no idea what I was getting myself into, but I ended up winning the race.

– I’ve been athletic for as long as I can remember, and was in track and field since about sixth grade. I also played basketball, volleyball and I rode my mountain bike. Ever since I was a kid I dreamed of being in the Olympics—at that time for track and field. I got a lot of injuries and started cycling. When I did that first tri, I was like, ‘Wow, this is another opportunity for me to be in some type of athletics.’ I wanted to reach the highest pinnacle, so my first thought process was that I wanted to get to the Olympics. Obviously you have to be a really strong swimmer, and I wasn’t quite there. I learned how to swim when I was in high school, but I never real put any focus into swimming until I started training for triathlon. I’m still trying to find that rhythm.

– My dad was a bodybuilder, so when I was younger I would always go to the gym and lift weights and I primarily did [leg weights] because I loved it. I’m thinking that’s where [the cycling prowess] started. I used to ride my mountain bike back and forth to track practice. And that was about 7 miles each way. I’d go as hard as I could to track practice.

– It was winter in 2008, and I was sick of being in the cold all the time. I found a triathlon camp in California, and I met a coach that gave me the idea that I could become a professional if I wanted to pursue it in the long distances. So that year I did my first half, and I progressed from there.

– I moved to Boulder, Colo., and jumped into Boulder Peak, and that was my first pro win and my first year as a pro, so that was really exciting for me. My first 70.3 was in Boulder and I got second, and that was a neat experience because it felt like my hometown race.

– I always wanted to do a full Ironman, but I was never able to produce enough volume so that I felt like I could contend in Ironman, so I focused on the 70.3 distance. And now that I’ve done a few fulls, I’m really wanting to focus on that.

RELATED PHOTOS: 2014 Ironman Chattanooga

– I came to do the Leadman Life Time race here [in Henderson, outside Las Vegas], and the pro liaison for that race was Paul, who’s now my husband. He picked me up from the airport and we hit it off—I fell in love with him at that moment. He’s been a local here for the past 10 years, so when we became a couple, I decided to move here. One year later, just before Ironman Tahoe, we got engaged, and a week later we got hitched. Our swim instructor at the time was a pastor, so we asked him to marry us. The day of the marriage, we just looked in our closet and I picked out a dress and he picked out a shirt and that was that.

– My first Ironman in Tahoe was the first time I’d run a marathon, so I was quite scared going into it. My whole goal with that race was just to finish and have a good time. You want to have your first Ironman race to be a good experience because otherwise you may never go back. I was running scared the entire run since the farthest I’d ever run was 16 miles. When I got to mile 18, I had a panic attack, thinking there was no way that I could make it. My focus was just one mile at a time, and at mile 25 I thought, ‘Wow, I can do another mile.’ You should never draw that line for yourself—you can always keep going.

– I have a folder called ‘The Mark Folder’ and it’s thousands of emails between [former coach Mark Allen and me], and there are so many words and sentences that spark something in my head and make me think a little differently. It makes a huge difference in how I go about my life and training. I read one every few days.

– I was in Panama and Natascha Badmann was racing and I didn’t know too much about her at the time. She just flew by me on the bike, and I was just overwhelmed. I was like, ‘Wow she’s phenomenal.’ We actually biked together that race and then she crashed just ahead of me right before T2. I stopped to make sure she was OK, then kept going. I thought she was absolutely done, and next thing I know she’s all bandaged up and running away and it threw me for a loop. She was just so inspiring so I started following her and learning more about her. When I crashed in 2012 at 70.3 worlds, she was there as well. She said a few words to me like, ‘You gotta finish this race,’ and so I did—because of her. Just to be in that good of shape and always happy and smiling and just grateful for everything is just a huge inspiration for me.

– I always wanted to do a full Ironman, but I was never able to produce enough volume so that i felt like i could contend in Ironman. …Now that I’ve done a few fulls, I’m really wanting to focus on that.

Find more pro triathlete interviews at Triathlete.com/profile.

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2015 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide: Goggles http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/gear-tech/2015-triathlete-buyers-guide-goggles-2_114144 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/gear-tech/2015-triathlete-buyers-guide-goggles-2_114144#comments Wed, 25 Mar 2015 20:47:06 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=114144

A look at the six goggles featured in the 2015 Triathlete Buyer's Guide.

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Enter To Win A Vitamix S30 & More http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/partnerconnect/partner-connect-2015-cherry-marketing-institute-contest_114129 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/partnerconnect/partner-connect-2015-cherry-marketing-institute-contest_114129#comments Wed, 25 Mar 2015 18:33:12 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=114129

Show Us How You #RecoverWithRed for a Chance to Win a Vitamix S30 and tart cherry prize pack.

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Show Us How You #RecoverWithRed for a Chance to Win a Vitamix S30 and tart cherry prize pack.

After a hard workout, it’s time to recuperate tired muscles.

Share a photo of how you recover with tart cherry juice using the hashtag #RecoverWithRed, and you could win a recovery prize pack featuring:

  • A Vitamix S30 (perfect for blending tart cherry recovery smoothies – retail value of $359)
  • A Tigger Point Therapy GRID foam roller (it hurts so good)
  • Montmorency tart cherry juice and dried tart cherries (to fuel your recovery!)

How To Enter

Whether you drink a glass of tart cherry juice after a long run or fuel your rides with tart cherry gummies, share your recovery routine using tart cherries on Instagram or Twitter, and tag with #RecoverWithRed. (PS: We love selfies!)

The contest ends on Tuesday, May 12, 2015, at 11:59 pm. Winners will be announced the following week.

For tart cherry recovery recipes to add to your training routine, visit ChooseCherries.com.

Studies have shown that Montmorency tart cherry juice may help reduce strength loss and aid recovery after extensive exercise. It’s easy and enjoyable to incorporate this real-food recovery aid into your training routine:

• Research recommends drinking two 8-ounce servings of tart cherry juice a day. You can mix it with water or drink it straight as a “shot.”
• Try tart cherry juice in the morning with your breakfast, or make a pre-workout smoothie with tart cherry juice, frozen tart cherries and Greek yogurt. You can also use tart cherry juice as a base for on-the-go snacks like homemade chews, or use dried cherries in bars, trail mixes or to make fruit leather. ChooseCherries.com has dozens of recipes to choose from.
• Drink an additional glass of tart cherry juice within 30 minutes after workouts.
• Look for tart cherry juice concentrate in your local supermarket.

Read the contest rules here.

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