Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com Triathlon Training, Gear, Nutrition, Photos, Race Results & Calendars Tue, 30 Aug 2016 16:55:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.5.2 One-Hour Workout: 10x Quick Hills For Run Strength http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/08/training/one-hour-workout-10x-quick-hills-for-run-strength_78504 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/08/training/one-hour-workout-10x-quick-hills-for-run-strength_78504#respond Tue, 30 Aug 2016 11:22:49 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=78504

Photo: Shutterstock.com

This workout teaches the body to use the muscles that are required to go up a steady grade that may be required during hilly run courses.

The post One-Hour Workout: 10x Quick Hills For Run Strength appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Every Tuesday we’ll feature a different coach’s workout you can complete in 60 mins (or less!).

This week’s hill running workout comes from Bay Area coach Mike Portman. “I learned early on how important it is for athletes to learn to run efficiently up and downhill,” he says. “This workout is great to teach the body to use the muscles that are required to go up a steady grade that may be required during hilly run courses. It is also beneficial to develop leg strength so you will have a little extra kick during the last 25 percent of the run leg.”

Find a hill between a 4–8 percent grade that will take 45-60 seconds to climb. When doing the uphill portions of the workout, try to focus on a good arm swing and a run cadence close to what you do on flat terrain. If you have a little extra time for your workout add an extra 10 seconds of a hard 5K effort once you have crested the top. It teaches your body to switch gears from climbing to going hard on flat terrain.

RELATED – Workout Of The Week: 3-2-1 Hill Repeats

The Workout

Warm-up
20 minutes easy jog.  3x(30 seconds of lunges, 30 seconds walk), 2 minutes jog

Main Set
10x(45–60 seconds hard uphill at 5K effort, 60 seconds walk/jog downhill recover)

Cool-down
15 minutes easy jog

RELATED – One-Hour Workout: Downhill Running

More one-hour workouts.

Follow Triathlete on Twitter @Triathletemag for inspiration, new workout ideas, gear reviews from our editors and more.

The post One-Hour Workout: 10x Quick Hills For Run Strength appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/08/training/one-hour-workout-10x-quick-hills-for-run-strength_78504/feed 0
Check It Out: New Race Through A Magical City http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/08/features/check-new-race-magical-city_136205 Mon, 29 Aug 2016 20:28:45 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=136205

Photo provided by Challenge Regensburg

The lowdown on Germany’s latest long course event

The post Check It Out: New Race Through A Magical City appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
The lowdown on Germany’s latest long course event

A UNESCO world heritage city with winding cobbled streets, southeast Germany’s Regensburg has a distinctly Mediterranean vibe that’s earned it the unofficial title of Italy’s northernmost city. An hour and a half drive from Munich, Regensburg is packed with eateries, historical sites, unique boutique shops, bike and run paths, and two pools within walking distance of the city center.

Challenge Regensburg picks up where Ironman Regensburg left off after producing a similar event in the city from 2010 to 2012. City officials approached race directors Tom and Sonja Tajsich in 2014 hoping to bring an international race back to the area; following city council approval, 18 months of hard work went into race preparations. Challenge Regensburg 2016 took place four weeks after Challenge Roth, the company’s flagship event located 75 miles northwest.

The Swim

The swim takes place in Guggenberger See, a pristine lake 12KM from Regensburg center. On paper, the swim course looks complicated because it’s two loops in opposite directions: the outer first loop goes counter clockwise (keeping the orange buoys to your left), then there’s a short run along the shore, followed by a clockwise inner loop. In practice, however, it’s easy to follow; buoys are plentiful and lane lines in the water clarify any point that has potential for confusion. The mirror calm water and light fog rising off the lake make for a smooth and relaxing start to the day. Tip: The lake can get warm in summertime, so you’ll want to be prepared for both wetsuit and non-wetsuit conditions.

The Bike

Also two loops, the bike course runs through a Bavarian countryside of picturesque villages with terra cotta roofed cottages, rolling farmland and wooded acreage. At the 7.5-mile mark, you’ll start a hilly 8.5-mile stretch with nearly 7.5-miles of climbing, leading to the bike course’s highest point (at the 16- and 65-mile marks) in the town of Brennberg. From there, you’ll enjoy a 3-mile descent to a relatively flat 33 miles before lap two begins. (After the second lap, a final 6-mile stretch leads back to Regensburg and T2.) Five official “hotspots” where spectators congregate on the bike course to cheer will keep your spirits up.

The Run

The four-loop course kicks off with just over a mile through the historic city center, with German triathlon fans drunk on Bavarian beer packing every inch of spectator space on either side. You’ll be so entertained, you won’t even notice that you’re running on cobblestones. Leaving the city center, you’ll hit a shaded park path with a partly paved, partly soft surface that runs alongside the Danube River, where locals enjoying the summer afternoon will join race fans to keep up the encouragement. On your final trip through town, you’ll turn toward the two towering spires of St. Peter’s Cathedral, a classic example of Gothic architecture built in the 700’s and commonly known as The Dom, finishing just beneath this landmark to the deafening roar of the crowd.

The second edition of Challenge Regensburg takes place on Aug. 13, 2017. Learn more at Challenge-regensburg.com

RELATED: Time Management Tips From A Very Busy Sonja Tajsich

The post Check It Out: New Race Through A Magical City appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
When To Climb In A Seated Or Standing Position http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/08/training/when-to-climb-in-a-seated-or-standing-position_123095 Mon, 29 Aug 2016 19:07:36 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=123095

Sebastian Kienle and Andreas Boecherer choose different methods to climb a hill at Ironman 70.3 Kraichgau. Photo: Endurapix

Staying aero in triathlon is key, but when and why does it make sense to switch to an upright or standing position for a climb?

The post When To Climb In A Seated Or Standing Position appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
For many newer triathletes, finding the best riding position during an uphill can be a trial-and-error process. For long hills with a mild grade or quick up-and-over rollers, you can maintain a faster speed by staying in the aero position. But when and why does it make sense to switch to an upright or standing position for a climb?

Seated: At some point, the aerodynamic benefits of being in aero are outweighed by the increased power production and comfort that come from climbing upright or standing. The commonly cited speed in which this becomes a wash is about 12 mph. Most cyclists can generate more power when seated, so sitting up to pedal when you’re going slower than 12 mph makes sense.

RELATED: Do’s And Don’ts Of Tackling Hills On The Bike

Standing: If the grade becomes very steep and you’re unable to turn over a reasonable cadence (60 RPM or lower) then it’s time to think about standing. Standing allows you to generate a little more power by leveraging your weight. If you’re smaller and have less muscle mass, you might need that leverage sooner.

However, standing also usually leads to heavier breathing and higher heart rates. If you’re tackling a shorter hill and don’t mind putting in a variable effort (think hard group ride), standing for a brief period will help you get to the top more easily.

Spiking up your heart rate by getting out of the saddle in a long race, though, can quickly lead to fatigued legs. The place for standing in a long steady effort race is when you need to temporarily change up muscle recruitment patterns after being stuck in the same position for a long time. A quick bout of standing while keeping the same effort level can feel like a break.

RELATED: Tough Big Gear Bike Workout

The post When To Climb In A Seated Or Standing Position appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Video: An Exercise To Improve Shoulder Health And Function http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/08/training/monday-minute-standing-one-arm-cable-row_5678 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/08/training/monday-minute-standing-one-arm-cable-row_5678#respond Mon, 29 Aug 2016 16:05:20 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/2011/10/videos/monday-minute-standing-one-arm-cable-row_6638

This week we show you the standing one-arm cable row, an exercise that helps improve shoulder health and function.

The post Video: An Exercise To Improve Shoulder Health And Function appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
This week we show you the standing one-arm cable row, an exercise that helps improve shoulder health and function. This is a great exercise for athletes who need to improve posture or have poor arm carry due to an old injury or previous condition.

More “Monday Minute” videos.

RELATED: Shoulder Exercises For A Stronger Swim

The post Video: An Exercise To Improve Shoulder Health And Function appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/08/training/monday-minute-standing-one-arm-cable-row_5678/feed 0
How Do I Know If I’m Overtraining? http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/08/training/know-im-overtraining_136202 Mon, 29 Aug 2016 13:17:08 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=136202

Photo: iStock

Your mind and body will give much better clues as to how you’re handling the training load than any algorithm can.

The post How Do I Know If I’m Overtraining? appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Athletes often ask me if they’re getting the right mix of training and rest. The answer can be quite simple: If you finish the day’s training craving more training, then you are most likely getting it right. If you find that at the end of the day, the last thing you want to do is get up and train again, then you are most likely overcooking yourself.

We have the capability through technology to track every move we make, and this can be very beneficial. However, your mind and body will give much better clues as to how you’re handling the training load than any algorithm can. For example, mood is a huge indicator. Lack of motivation is an obvious sign of needing a rest, but also pay attention to some of these clues: Do you find yourself snapping at family or coworkers? Is your mind a bit foggy? Do you have trouble sleeping or restless legs at night or do you lack an appetite in the mornings? These are a few signs that it might be time to take it easy.

RELATED – One-Hour Workout: 30 Seconds Hard, 30 Seconds Easy Run

Here’s your plan for avoiding overtraining yourself:

„Take your easy days easy! If you have a coach, follow your coach’s plan. Apps like Strava can be great for motivation, but if your schedule calls for an easy ride don’t go chasing a KOM on your local climb.

„Avoid the grey area of training, especially during your long rides and runs. If your plan calls for a long slow run or an aerobic ride, then go with friends that will hold you back. This is the day you want to avoid the local smashfest group ride or run.

„Do not go all out! For age group triathletes there is very little need to go to your max. If you find yourself really burning in a session, pull back a touch to that feel-good level. Too much overreaching will no doubt trigger some of the warning signs mentioned earlier.

If you do find yourself feeling a bit overdone, simply back off for a few days and catch up on sleep and eat lots of whole, nutrient-rich foods, including good fats like cheese, avocados and nuts. After a few days you will be ready to attack your training plan with a refreshed body and mind!

Scott DeFilippis is a professional triathlete and the head coach at KIS Coaching (Kiscoaching.com).

More “Dear Coach”

The post How Do I Know If I’m Overtraining? appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Photos: One Of The Most Unique 70.3 Venues In The World http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/08/photos/photos-one-unique-70-3-venues-world_136155 Sun, 28 Aug 2016 21:13:51 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=136155

At Ironman 70.3 Brazil-Paraguay athletes competed on both sides of the Itaipu Dam, one of the Seven Wonders of the Modern World.

The post Photos: One Of The Most Unique 70.3 Venues In The World appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
$(document).ready(function() { $(".fancybox").fancybox({type: 'image', margin : [20, 60, 20, 60]}); });

Photos: Wagner Araujo

On Saturday, Aug. 27 athletes competed in the Itaipu Ironman 703 Brazil-Paraguay race. The event is known for being one of the most unique on the 70.3 circuit, with athletes racing on both sides of the Itaipu Dam—one of the Seven Wonders of the Modern World. As the name of the race implies, the course takes athletes through both Brazil and Paraguay. The race started at Paraguay side of Itaipu Dam with a rectangular swim course, followed by a bike course divided into one long leg and two short laps inside the dam. Athletes then enjoyed the scenic views the region is known for during a three-lap run course.

The post Photos: One Of The Most Unique 70.3 Venues In The World appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Week In Tech: New Kinetic Trainer, Lazer Aero Helmet http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/08/gear-tech/week-tech-new-kinetic-trainer-lazer-aero-helmet_136147 Fri, 26 Aug 2016 20:22:56 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=136147

Photo: Lazer

All the gear news, tips, and announcements you need and none of the marketing gibberish you don’t.

The post Week In Tech: New Kinetic Trainer, Lazer Aero Helmet appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Our friends at Velonews.com share the week in tech—all the gear news, tips, and announcements you need and none of the marketing gibberish you don’t.

Kinetic unveils new smart control trainers

Minneapolis-based Kinetic design announced its new line of smart control trainers including the free-moving electronic Rock and Roll trainer. The trainers include an electronically controlled resistance unit, large flywheel, power data, and realistic ride feel. They are Bluetooth Smart compatible and fully integrated with the Kinetic’s Fit power training app. Kinetic will officially debut the new trainers at Eurobike and Interbike and products are scheduled to arrive in stores beginning in late September.

Lazer balances aero and ventilation with new Bullet aero helmet

Lazer’s sleek new Bullet aero road helmet has a small frontal area and narrow drop-like shape for optimal aerodynamics. But it doesn’t sacrifice ventilation for speed like most aero road helmets on the market. Small side vents and a large rear exhaust vent provide airflow while an adjustable front vent can be opened or closed to adjust the level airflow needed.

Get more from the week in tech at Velonews.com

The post Week In Tech: New Kinetic Trainer, Lazer Aero Helmet appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Gwen Jorgensen Up For Best Of Rio Olympics Team USA Award http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/08/olympics/gwen-jorgensen-best-rio-olympics-team-usa-award_136143 Fri, 26 Aug 2016 20:11:58 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=136143

Jorgensen enjoys her moment on top of the podium. Photo: Delly Carr/Triathlon.org

Jorgensen is one of five female nominees.

The post Gwen Jorgensen Up For Best Of Rio Olympics Team USA Award appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Olympic triathlon champion Gwen Jorgensen has been nominated for the Team USA Awards presented by Dow, Best of the Games by the United States Olympic Committee for outstanding achievements at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games.

Read the announcement from USA Triathlon below:

Jorgensen (St. Paul, Minn.) is one of five female nominees, and votes may be cast for the Best of the Games honors at teamusa.org/awards. Voting for the Team USA Awards presented by Dow ends at 11:59 p.m. ET on Tuesday, Sept. 6.

Jorgensen’s victory is the first-ever Olympic gold medal in triathlon for the U.S. Jorgensen set a goal four years ago of winning gold in Rio after sustaining a flat tire on the bike during the London Olympic Games triathlon. During the competition in Rio, she came out of the water in prime position to ride in the lead group, which allowed her to take an early lead during the 10-kilometer run portion. For the first 8k of the run, Jorgensen ran side-by-side with 2012 Olympic champion Nicola Spirig of Switzerland. Jorgensen surged ahead of Spirig with just 2k left, finishing in 1:56:16 seconds, a margin of 40 seconds ahead of Spirig.

In addition to Jorgensen, other nominees for the Female Athlete of the Olympic Games, presented by Dicks Sporting Goods are Simone Biles, gymnastics; Katie Ledecky, swimming; Helen Maroulis, wrestling; and Claressa Shields, boxing.

RELATED: Gwen Jorgensen’s Four-Year Journey To Gold

The post Gwen Jorgensen Up For Best Of Rio Olympics Team USA Award appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Properly Prepare Your Joints For Training And Racing http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/08/training/properly-prepare-joints-training-racing_136122 Fri, 26 Aug 2016 17:11:06 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=136122

Photo by Oliver Baker

In order to properly free up the areas where triathletes tend to be tight, a proper warm-up should entail more than just a jog.

The post Properly Prepare Your Joints For Training And Racing appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>

Prepare your joints for training and racing with this routine. 

In order to properly free up the areas where triathletes tend to be tight, a proper warm-up should entail more than just a jog, says Erin Carson, founder of ECFIT Boulder, owner of Rally Sport Health & Fitness and strength coach to countless Boulder-based pros. “Swimming, biking and running work our joints in a limited range of motion,” she says. “Our hips, ankles and thoracic spines in particular get tight and short from so much repetitive motion. Mobility helps undo this tightness and allows us greater access to the muscles we’ve developed through training.”

Carson recommends incorporating mobility exercises into your weekly training as well as your pre-race routine (after a 8-10 minute warm-up jog). Here’s her favorite race day routine, which can easily be performed in the transition area.

Ankles

Start in a half-kneel position, right knee up. (Tuck a towel under your left knee for cushioning if necessary.)

Using your thumbs, rub from top to bottom across the top of your right ankle. “It’s a release technique using your thumbs like a foam roller. You want to be sure that the retinaculum [the band of tissue across the top of your ankle] is free and that the skin moves easily across it. If you’re tight in front, you can’t fully use your calf muscle,” says Carson.

Keeping the right foot rooted on the ground, rotate the knee several times each direction in big circles to further loosen the ankle.

Repeat on the opposite side.

RELATED – One-Hour Workout: The Pros’ Strength Session

The post Properly Prepare Your Joints For Training And Racing appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
The Greatest Tri Companies That (Never) Were http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/08/features/greatest-tri-companies-never_136120 Fri, 26 Aug 2016 16:20:38 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=136120

llustration provided by Hybris

One huge triumph (and two that faded away)

The post The Greatest Tri Companies That (Never) Were appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>

 One huge triumph (and two that faded away)

Over the past four years, the Triathlete staff has gotten giddy about all sorts of tri-related ventures, from a 1,100-acre playground for triathletes to an office full of CompuTrainers and dedicated space at a local lap pool. We covered these exciting ideas when they were just promises—promises we so badly wanted to come true. So we followed up to see which ideas soared, and which kicked the bucket. The best part: even when things didn’t work out, each venture gave us reason to stay stoked about the future.

Tri Habitat

The Promise

Promoted on their website as the “world’s first and only self-contained endurance sports racing and training venue,” Tri Habitat was going to be a triathlon mecca set inside 1,100 acres just outside of Wilmington, N.C. Boasting a lake, a pavilion, a full race course, five “stadiums” and a lodge, Tri Habitat looked to be the model for a training center that would outshine even the United States’ Olympic Training Center in Chula Vista.

The Hype
After having two separate facility proposals denied due to significant community pushback, according to a local news story, organizers were finally granted a special use permit to begin construction in October of 2014. Immediately, the triathlon community was abuzz with excitement—we ran a story about the venture in Triathlete, and the local mainstream media covered Tri Habitat’s plans as well. The facility was slated to be finished in 2016, and developers were looking to lure big-name investors into the fold.

The Rub
According to the same local story, when developers applied for the facility in October 2014, they planned to raise the necessary funds without local assistance. “This is a significant capital investment being made and guess what? They didn’t come asking for any incentives to do it,” Pender County Commission Chairman David Williams said in the piece. Coming at a time when many big corporations were dialing back their spending in the sport (for example, Lifetime Fitness ended their long-standing pro series in early 2015), Tri Habitat’s lack of local support— both financially and in spirit—appeared to stall the project.

The Reality
According to a piece in the Wilmington StarNews, on Feb. 9 of this year, Bill Scott, CEO of Tri Habitat and owner of N.C.-based Setup Events, sent an email to Pender County Planning Director Kyle Breuer with some bad news:

“I wanted to let you know that we have officially ceased plans to build Tri Habitat in this area,” he said. “It had always been my hope that we would be able to secure the necessary financial support to build Tri Habitat in the Wilmington area, but after a few years of ‘no luck’ on the investment side of things coupled with some recent developments, we have changed our direction.”

In the story, Scott went on to say that Tri Habitat was hoping to restart the project in Florida, with the encouragement of a large investor in Orlando. Tri Habitat did not respond to Triathlete’s request for comment.

The post The Greatest Tri Companies That (Never) Were appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Quick Set Friday: Distance Build http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/08/training/quick-set-friday-distance-build_62803 Fri, 26 Aug 2016 15:00:06 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=62803

Another creative workout from Triathlete contributor and swimming all-star Sara McLarty to take to the pool this weekend.

The post Quick Set Friday: Distance Build appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Triathlete contributor and swimming all-star Sara McLarty has a blog with more than 500 creative workouts used in her Masters swim program in Clermont, Fla. We’ll feature a workout every Friday so you have new ideas to take to the pool. On her blog, you can pick a Monday set for a long distance focus, a Wednesday set for sprint training, or Friday for creative open water skills.

The A sets are between 4–5000 yards total, with intervals ranging from 1:20–1:30 per 100. The B sets are 3000–3500 total, with intervals of 1:50–2:00 per 100. The C sets are 2000–2500 total and all based on a rest interval.

A:
200 swim/200 kick/200 IM/200 pull/200 swim
100, 200, 300, 400, 500 pull @ 1:20 per 100
100, 200, 300, 400 swim @ 1:25 per 100
100, 200, 300 IM @ 1:45 per 100
6×50 kick @ 1:00
300 cool down
*4700 Total*

RELATED – Ask Coach Sara: What Is The Point Of Longer Sets?

B:
200 swim/200 kick/200 pull/200 swim
100, 200, 300, 400, 500 pull @ 1:50 per 100
100, 200, 300, 400 swim @ 1:55 per 100
6×50 kick @ 1:15
300 cool down

*3900 Total*

RELATEDAsk Coach Sara: What Is A Normal Breathing Pattern?

C:
200 swim/200 kick/200 pull/200 swim
100, 200, 300 pull w/:20 rest
100, 200, 300 swim w/:20 rest
6×50 kick w/:15 rest
300 cool down
*2600 Total*

More Quick Set Friday workouts.

The post Quick Set Friday: Distance Build appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Recipe Of The Week: Melon Prosciutto Peach Salad http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/08/nutrition/recipe-week-melon-prosciutto-peach-salad_136116 Thu, 25 Aug 2016 21:08:05 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=136116

Use this side dish to add a little nutrition to that Labor Day barbecue!

The post Recipe Of The Week: Melon Prosciutto Peach Salad appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
The final days of summer are near, but summer fruits are still lusciously ripe. Try this juicy, sweet melon and peach salad, counterbalanced with salty prosciutto and crisp basil. Use this side dish to add a little nutrition to that Labor Day barbecue!

Ingredients*

10 large scoops cantaloupe (about ½ melon)
10 large scoops honeydew (about ½ melon)
1 large peach, cut into ½ inch pieces
6 slices cucumber (about ½ inch thick), cut in half
8 slices prosciutto
24 small basil leaves
olive oil
red-wine vinegar
sea salt and fresh-cracked pepper

*Makes two of the plates shown in the picture, which can also be combined on a large platter, or even doubled for a large crowd.

RELATED: 4 Melon-Based Recipes

Preparation

1. Arrange the melon scoops, peach pieces, and cucumber on two plates or a large platter.
2. Tear the prosciutto slices in half, lengthwise, and roll the halves into a rose shape.
3. Arrange the prosciutto throughout the fruit and cucumber.
4. Roll the basil leaves into a rose shape, and arrange throughout all of the ingredients.
5. Drizzle with olive oil, red-wine vinegar and sprinkle with sea salt and fresh cracked pepper.

More recipes from Jessica Cerra

Jessica Cerra is the owner of Fit Food by Jess, a private chef and catering company in Encinitas, Calif., and the co-founder of JoJe Bar. A former professional XTERRA triathlete, Cerra now races for Twenty16 Women’s Professional Cycling Team.

The post Recipe Of The Week: Melon Prosciutto Peach Salad appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
2016 Ironman 70.3 World Championship Pro Start Lists http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/08/ironman/2016-ironman-70-3-world-championship-pro-start-lists_136112 Thu, 25 Aug 2016 20:36:06 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=136112

Ryf is a two-time Ironman 70.3 world champion. Photo: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image

Australia will host the Ironman 70.3 World Championship for the first time next month.

The post 2016 Ironman 70.3 World Championship Pro Start Lists appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>

Australia will host the Ironman 70.3 World Championship for the first time next month, and it will welcome a top-notch professional field. Despite the fact that the Sept. 4 event, set to take place in Mooloolaba, Queensland, is just over one month before and nearly 5,000 miles away from the Ironman World Championship in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, several top professionals have chosen to make the start.

A pair of two-time Ironman 70.3 world champions highlight the women’s start list, with 2014 and 2015 winner Daniela Ryf (SUI) coming in as the heavy favorite to make it a three-peat. She’ll face the other two-time winner, Melissa Huaschildt (AUS), as well as another previous winner in Leanda Cave (GBR). Other top names include Heather Wurtele (CAN), Caroline Steffen (SUI), Holly Lawrence (GBR), Lauren Barnett (USA), Alicia Kaye (USA), Linsey Corbin (USA) and Radka Vodickova (CZE).

On the men’s side, defending champion Jan Frodeno (GER) has decided to not to compete, making two-time winner—and last year’s runner-up—Sebastian Kienle (GER) the favorite to reclaim the title. Other past winners include Australia’s Craig Alexander (who has also won it twice) and New Zealand’s Terenzo Bozzone. Brent McMahon (CAN), Ruedi Wild (SUI), Tim Reed (AUS),  Lionel Sanders (CAN), Andreas Dreitz (GER), Joe Gambles (AUS), Luke Mckenzie (AUS) are a few of several names who could make the podium in a competitive men’s race.

RELATED PHOTOS: 2015 Ironman 70.3 Sunshine Coast

See the start list below and check back for a complete preview.

Women

101 Daniela Ryf (SUI)
102 Heather Wurtele (CAN)
104 Magali Tisseyre (CAN)
105 Caroline Steffen (SUI)
106 Annabel Luxford (AUS)
107 Holly Lawrence (GBR)
108 Lauren Barnett (USA)
109 Natascha Schmitt (GER)
110 Melissa Hauschildt (AUS)
111 Leanda Cave (GBR)
112 Radka Vodickova (CZE)
114 Alexandra Tondeur (BEL)
115 Alicia Kaye (USA)
116 Heather Lendway (USA)
117 Ricarda Lisk (GER)
118 Sarah Crowley (AUS)
119 Linsey Corbin (USA)
120 Laura Siddall (GBR)
121 Astrid Stienen (GER)
122 Nikki Bartlett (GBR)
123 Andrea Forrest (AUS)
124 Ellie Salthouse (AUS)
125 Lauren Brandon (USA)
126 Kate Bevilaqua (AUS)
127 Laura Philipp (GER)
128 Kirsty Jahn (CAN)
129 Katey Gibb (AUS)
130 Dimity‐Lee Duke (AUS)
132 Caroline Livesey (GBR)
133 Kate Pedley (AUS)
134 Jessica Mitchell (AUS)
137 Renee Baker (AUS)
138 Erika Simon (ARG)
139 Kym Coogan (AUS)

Men

2 Sebastian Kienle (GER)
3 Lionel Sanders (CAN)
4 Ruedi Wild (SUI)
5 Antony Costes (FRA)
6 Tim Reed (AUS)
8 Andreas Dreitz (GER)
9 Tim Don (GBR)
10 Craig Alexander (AUS)
11 Trevor Wurtele (CAN)
12 Jake Montgomery (AUS)
15 Samuel Appleton (AUS)
16 Taylor Reid (CAN)
17 Joe Gambles (AUS)
18 Josh Amberger (AUS)
20 Brent McMahon (CAN)
21 Terenzo Bozzone (NZL)
22 Christian Hoerper (GER)
23 Jan Van Berkel (SUI)
24 Maurice Clavel (GER)
25 Casey Munro (AUS)
26 Mitchell Robins (AUS)
27 Mike Phillips (NZL)
28 David Mainwaring (AUS)
29 Matthew Pellow (AUS)
30 Braden Currie (NZL)
31 Paulo Roberto Maciel da Silva (BRA)
32 Tyler Butterfield (BER)
33 Rodrigo Acevedo (USA)
34 Milosz Sowinski (POL)
35 Luke Mckenzie (AUS)
36 Igor Amorelli (BRA)
37 Guy Crawford (NZL)
38 Nicholas Kastelein (AUS)
39 David Breuer (GER)
40 Peter Kerr (AUS)
41 Mark Bowstead (NZL)
42 Brad Kahlefeldt (AUS)
43 Graham O’Grady (NZL)
44 Nick Baldwin (SYC)
45 Adam Gordon (AUS)
46 Tim George (AUS)
47 Michael Davidson (RSA)
48 Brad Williams (USA)
49 Mitchell Kibby (AUS)
50 Daniel Fontana (ITA)
52 Roberto Rivera (CHI)
53 Paul Schuster (GER)
54 Matt Franklin (NZL)
55 Mauro Baertsch (SUI)

The post 2016 Ironman 70.3 World Championship Pro Start Lists appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Is Your Gear Past Its Expiration Date? http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/08/photos/gear-expiration-dates_135573 Thu, 25 Aug 2016 17:04:19 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=135573

From wetsuits to running shoes, there will come a time when your well-loved tri gear kicks the bucket.

The post Is Your Gear Past Its Expiration Date? appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
From wetsuits to running shoes, there will come a time when your well-loved tri gear kicks the bucket. Here’s how to tell when to hold on, and when it’s time to let go.

For more info on when to replace bike components, check out our handy bike maintenance schedule.

The post Is Your Gear Past Its Expiration Date? appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
This Cuban Triathlete Is Clearing The Way For Others http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/08/features/cuban-triathlete-clearing-way-others_136105 Wed, 24 Aug 2016 21:48:02 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=136105

Photo: Steve Godwin

Cuban triathlete Raul Alcolea finds a way to live out his multisport dreams—and clears the way for other aspiring athletes.

The post This Cuban Triathlete Is Clearing The Way For Others appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Cuban triathlete Raul Alcolea finds a way to live out his multisport dreams—and clears the way for other aspiring athletes.

Raul Alcolea hits rewind on his VCR and plays the tape once more: Mark Allen crossing the finish line of the Ironman World Championships in 1995; Thomas Hellriegel taking top honors in 1997; Luc Van Lierde’s win in 1999.

“The images are so touching,” Alcolea says, gasping at another image on the screen. “Look! Crawling to arrive at the finish line!”

This is the video that changed Alcolea’s life. The day after watching highlight clips of the Ironman World Championship, he decided he was going to become an Ironman as well. Nothing would stop him—except for the Cuban government.

The Caribbean island didn’t offer much in the way of triathlon events, and government officials denied Alcolea’s request to travel outside of the country to participate an Ironman triathlon.

“But my motivation was huge,” he recalls. One year later, on Christmas Eve 2004, Alcolea—using a rope to measure the swim course, a steel bike, and an extremely weathered pair of running shoes—became a de facto Ironman in Santiago de Cuba. His finish time was 11 hours, 9 minutes and 16 seconds. There was little fanfare at the finish line of his self-made Ironman, but the experience was still the best moment of Alcolea’s life.

“I kept training because maybe someday I could participate in a real Ironman,” says Alcolea.

Meanwhile in Canada, Shelly Laflin got wind of Alcolea’s efforts. As a 10-time Ironman finisher, Laflin felt an immediate kinship with the Cuban and wanted to help a fellow triathlete achieve his dreams. Some of Laflin’s American friends, similarly inspired, had gathered triathlon gear to donate to Alcolea, but the USA’s trade embargo on Cuba made delivery problematic.

“The shipping cost and complications of getting to Cuba from the USA were very complicated,” says Laflin. “Since I was from Canada and could easily go there, they asked if I would be interested in taking a bike and other donated items to Raul. How could I not help?”

Laflin flew to Cuba with a new bike, new and used clothing, tubes, tires, swim goggles, shoes, and copies of triathlon magazines. Meeting Alcolea was an eye-opening experience for Laflin, who recalls being struck by just how limited the resources were for Cuban triathletes:

“They have very, very little, and what they do have they cherish and appreciate like gold. Raul showed me a man’s razor. He was holding onto it like it was precious, as he said it was his one and only and had to make it last close to a year.” Needless to say, Laflin’s haul was life-changing for the working-class athlete.

Since that first meeting almost 10 years ago, Laflin and Alcolea have maintained a close friendship built on triathlon. In 2009, Laflin filed paperwork to sponsor travel for Alcolea to compete in Ironman Canada, but the request was once again denied by the Cuban government. During their frequent phone calls, Laflin tells Alcolea stories about her most recent Ironman races, and Alcolea shares tales of training and racing in Cuba.

The two remain optimistic Alcolea will one day achieve his dream of racing a sanctioned Ironman event. Recent developments in diplomatic relations between the United States and Cuba gives Alcolea hope his travel requests will be approved soon. In the meantime, Alcolea trains every day on gear provided by his Canadian friend.

RELATED PHOTOS: American Athletes Report Back on Racing in Cuba

Paying It Forward

Because triathlon changed his life for the better, Alcolea now works with nonprofit organization One World Running to put running shoes on the feet of Cuba’s emerging athletes.

“There are many challenges in getting shoes to the Cuban runners and triathletes,” says Mike Sandrock, founder of One World Running. “We cannot just load up a cargo container or a load a truck and drive the shoes, as we do for other areas we serve.”

Instead, Sandrock recruits volunteers to travel as a group to Cuba for service trips to help runners. Volunteers use their baggage allowance (44 pounds) almost entirely for donated running shoes. Once on the island, Alcolea helps Sandrock identify aspiring runners and triathletes in need of gear.

“He helps ensure that those who need the equipment benefit,” says Sandrock. “I remember one time, we came to Cuba with some new gear. After everything was distributed to a group of young runners and triathletes, I took an easy run with Raul. I looked down and saw that he had a worn pair of Newtons on that we had given him the year before. ‘Raul, where are your new shoes?’ I asked. ‘I gave them to another athlete who needed them,’ he said.”

RELATED: Canadian Triathletes Bring Gear To Cuba

The post This Cuban Triathlete Is Clearing The Way For Others appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Why You’re Cramping On The Run http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/08/nutrition/dealing-cramping-run_103210 Wed, 24 Aug 2016 21:25:11 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=103210

Photo: Shutterstock.com

In a long-course race, I felt super tired and my muscles cramped up two-thirds of the way into the run, despite drinking tons of fluid.

The post Why You’re Cramping On The Run appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Q: In a recent long-course race, I felt super tired and my muscles cramped up two-thirds of the way into the run, despite drinking tons of fluid. Where did I go wrong?

A: I’m pretty sure you failed to take in enough sodium during your long-course race. Although I’m sure you’ve heard of the dangers of both under-hydrating and hyponatremia (over-hydrating, or diluting your electrolytes), the entire topic of hydrating can be very confusing to even the smartest of triathletes. You can still become dehydrated despite adequate fluid intake if you’re not keeping your sodium balance in check. It is likely that you took in too little sodium, and I recommend you increase your intake of sodium before and during your next long training or race. Increase your sports drink consumption to at least 50–75 percent of your total fluid intake during your training and race. Use an endurance sports drink (with 200 milligrams of sodium per 8 ounces versus the usual 110). I would also recommend you conduct a few sweat tests to more accurately determine your sweat rate and help ensure you are drinking the correct amount. Finally, add electrolyte tabs as needed until you are drinking enough fluid to nearly match your sweat rate. The combination of adequate total fluid and much-needed sodium will help propel you to a strong and safe finish in your next race.

RELATED: Get Serious About Sodium

More Nutrition Q&As.

Lauren Antonucci, R.D., is a board-certified specialist in sports dietetics, three-time Ironman finisher and the founding director of Nutrition Energy in New York City.

The post Why You’re Cramping On The Run appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Finding The Perfect Time Trial Position http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/08/gear-tech/finding-perfect-time-trial-position_136093 Wed, 24 Aug 2016 20:17:09 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=136093

Photo: Michael Rauschendorfer / Endurapix

A bike guru ahares his advice for developing and maintaining the perfect position on the bike.

The post Finding The Perfect Time Trial Position appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
A bike guru’s advice for developing and maintaining a perfect time trial position.

Professional triathlete Laura Siddall credited her second-place breakthrough performance at February’s Challenge Wanaka to working with coach Paul Buick, a New Zealand native who serves as the Purplepatch Fitness bike guru. Buick is known for going beyond just the bike fit—he assists athletes with how they should interact with the bike.

While it’s not practical for most athletes to work so closely with a personal cycling coach, Buick shares his advice for developing and maintaining the perfect position on the bike.

RELATED: Bike Fit Fixes

Saddle

In order to find what works for you, saddle selection comes down to personal preference as well as trial and error. When testing saddles, Buick advises athletes to focus on the “saddle-short-athlete” combination to find the most comfortable seat:

Test saddles in your triathlon race shorts. Not only will it help you find the saddle combination that will work for you during a race, but it will help you avoid artificially lowering your seat compared to testing and training in the thicker chamois of a training bib.

RELATED – 2016 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide: Saddles

Seated position

Paying attention to where you are seated on the saddle in your fitted position is also critical. Not only should your bike fit be biomechanically efficient, it should be a position that you can maintain throughout the duration of a race. Your perfectly dialed aero position goes to waste if you are fidgeting around on your saddle during the ride.

Identify your seated position and aim to maintain it throughout the duration of your training rides. A slight shift forward on the saddle will trigger a number of further adjustments that will compromise your overall position, such as hands choked back on the aero bars, back arched and pelvis rotated backwards.

RELATED: Seven Tips To Get Comfortable In The Aero Position

Posture

Buick recommends that triathletes include road bike rides consistently throughout the season to help with both bike position awareness as well as improved postural fitness. The aero bars of a time trial position add skeletal support, whereas that support does not exist on the road bike.

You can simulate road riding, even if you don’t have a road bike, by riding your triathlon bike on the base bars. Practicing good base bar posture will strengthen your lower back and relieve tension in your neck.

The post Finding The Perfect Time Trial Position appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Do’s And Don’ts Of Running Stronger Off The Bike http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/08/training/run-stronger-off-the-bike_120964 Wed, 24 Aug 2016 17:10:10 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=120964

Photo: Janos Schmidt/Triathlon.org

Make your bike-to-run transition easier by reinforcing a fast turnover.

The post Do’s And Don’ts Of Running Stronger Off The Bike appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Make your bike-to-run transition easier by reinforcing a fast turnover.

Watch the best triathletes transition in any race and one of the things you’ll notice is their ability to seamlessly run off the bike. To start the run without slogging takes a concentrated effort. Set your transition legs up for success with these tips from Steve Trew, a longtime British triathlon coach and co-author of the book 100 Essential Triathlon Sessions.

Maintain A High RPM On The Bike

As discussed on page 52, this tip comes with a warning sticker—some athletes (like Chrissie Wellington) can crank out a very low RPM and still maintain a high run cadence due to how they react to training and their ability to negate muscle memory. But for most athletes, especially at shorter distances, there’s a good case for keeping up the cadence (85+ RPM), particularly toward the end of a discipline, Trew says.

“There’s muscle memory to take into account, and if your legs have been turning over at 85/90/95 RPM, there’s no huge shock to them to try to go into the run discipline at approximately the same [180 foot hits per minute],” Trew says. “To try to transfer 60 RPM on the bike directly into 180 foot hits is a massive ask.”

However, he believes, it may be different for iron-distance races. “There’s a lot of time to get the body and legs to accept the necessary changes, and some distance triathletes can race brilliantly on a bigger gear and slower cadence for Ironman. For half-Ironman, there is now a real need for run speed, so a lot of thinking is required from athletes as to what’s individually best for them.”

RELATED: 4 “Big Gear” Cycling Workouts To Build Leg Strength

Sharpen Up With Short Speedowrk

This workout from Trew’s book (which he co-wrote with coach Dan Bullock) is a set of 400-meter efforts aimed at improving strength, speed and the mental toughness to maintain race pace under pressure.

What it is: A set of repetition 400m efforts, all based at 3,000m race pace*, but with “a sting in the tail.” Ten 400m efforts are run at 3K race pace; the first three are run with just 20 seconds of recovery between them then a 1-minute recovery. The second three follow that same pattern. Finally, a fourth 400m is added to the last round, making this a very demanding session.

*To calculate your 3K race pace, Trew says this: Probably the simplest way is to add on around 15 seconds per mile as you go up a distance. So, if you run a 5-minute mile then you’d run a 10:30 two miles (5:15 mile pace). So for doing reps over 400m, it would be around 4 seconds difference. For example, 6:00 mile pace over a 5K race would give 5:45 mile pace over 3000m, so reps on 400m at 1:26.

RELATED: Do Speedwork Now, Benefit Later

Workout

10x400m total
– 3x400m with 20 sec recovery after each
– 60 sec recovery
– 3x400m with 20 sec recovery after each
– 60 sec recovery
– 4x400m with 20 sec recovery after each
– 60 sec recovery

Variations: Add two extra 400m, making the sub-sets three, then four; and finally five efforts for a total of 12 in all. Even more demanding!

RELATED: 5 Exercises To Bolster Running Form

Maintain A Strong Running Form

Follow these form pointers— and focus on them both in training and during a race—to ensure you’re not blowing your efficiency.

Don’t Do This
Form Fail: Over-striding
Indicator: Braking effect stops momentum with each stride

Form Fail: Seated running
Indicator: Hips back, bum out

Form Fail: Tight shoulders
Indicator: Shoulders are tense and your neck disappears

Form Fail: Forced breathing
Indicator: Shallow breaths or holding your breath, which will lead to early fatigue

Form Fail: Tight head position
Indicator: A rolling, bobbing head, detracts from run technique

Form Fail: Heel strike
Indicator: Foot strike under knee

Form Fail: Vertical movement
Indicator: Bobbing up and down while running

Do This
Form Focus: Deep belly breathing
How To: Focus on breathing out rather than in.

Form Focus: Upright running
How To: Push hips forward, lean forward from your feet.

Form Focus: High stride frequency
How To: Shorten your stride and maintain a good cadence of 90+ RPM on all runs.

Form Focus: Consistent arm swing
How To: Beware of an uneven arm action.

Form Focus: Focus on the ground 15–20 feet ahead
How To: Look ahead and relax your lower jaw—practice on all types of runs.

The post Do’s And Don’ts Of Running Stronger Off The Bike appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Gwen Jorgensen To Run New York City Marathon http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/08/news/gwen-jorgensen-run-nyc-marathon_136096 Wed, 24 Aug 2016 13:46:57 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=136096

There will be no rest for Jorgensen following her gold medal performance. Photo: Delly Carr/Triathlon.org

The Olympic gold medalist has a busy fall of racing planned.

The post Gwen Jorgensen To Run New York City Marathon appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Just a few days after winning her Olympic gold medal in Rio, American Gwen Jorgensen is in New York City to talk about the Olympic experience. One of her first stops was CNBC’s “Squawk Box” where she talked about her journey from a full-time Certified Public Accountant to one of the best triathletes in the world.

When asked what was next, Jorgensen dropped a bit of news that will come as a surprise to many. Instead of taking time off, she has a busy fall planned. The American will compete in the 2016 ITU WTS Grand Final in Cozumel on Sept. 11. She is the defending two-time world champion, but with a busy year of focusing on the Olympics she currently sits in third behind Jodie Stimpson (GBR) and Flora Duffy (BER). She will then head to the Island House Invitational Triathlon in the Bahamas to compete from Oct. 28-30 against triathlon stars from across all distances.

She followed that news with the big announcement saying, “I’m really ready for a new challenge and I’m excited to announce that I’m going to be doing the New York City Marathon.”

Jorgensen expanded on her reasons for competing in the marathon in an a press release from the race. “This has been such an incredible year for me, and I thought what better way to continue to challenge myself than by running my first marathon,” said Jorgensen. “The triathlon will always be my first love, but I am really looking forward to the marathon and cannot think of a better place to make my debut than New York City.”

Watch the CNBC interview here

RELATED: Gwen Jorgensen First American To Earn Olympic Gold

The post Gwen Jorgensen To Run New York City Marathon appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Don’t Dread The Descent! http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/08/training/dont-dread-the-descent_119034 Tue, 23 Aug 2016 21:22:20 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=119034

Liz Lyles descends the back side of Nasty Grade at Wildflower. Photo: Aaron Hersh

Does riding downhill make you skittish? Read these tips.

The post Don’t Dread The Descent! appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Does riding downhill make you skittish? Read these tips.

It’s a simple law of gravity: what goes up must come down. On a bike, however, going downhill can be scary. A steep descent can produce some of the highest speeds most triathletes will reach on a bike—a notion that leaves even the steeliest of triathletes feathering their brakes.

“Nothing is scarier than a high-speed crash,” says Scott Wilkinson, professional triathlete and coach with OutRival Racing. However, Wilkinson says the potential for crashing can be reduced greatly with preparation and practice. Descend like a pro with these tips from Wilkinson.

Do Course Recon

Before any major ride—especially one with significant climbing and descending—drive the route.

“Know the road as well as possible beforehand,” suggests Wilkinson. In addition to getting an idea of what you’re about to undertake, this course recon will allow you to confirm your route is safe. Look for areas with loose gravel, tight corners, or debris—all factors which can contribute to high-speed crashes.

If, for some reason, you can’t drive the route before you ride it, you’ve still got homework. Wilkinson says at the very least, cyclists should research the route online using Google Maps’ “street view” feature.

Seat Yourself

Instinct may prompt you to sit far upright and back on the seat when descending, but consider altering your position when coasting down. Lift slightly out of the saddle and affix your hands on the hoods (for road bikes) or base bar (for tri bikes) for more control.

Look Ahead

Yes, the views from the summit of your climb are gorgeous, but your eyes should be fixed on the road. Because you’ll be traveling faster on the downhills, it will take longer to brake in an emergency. Staying alert and focused on the road will allow you to respond quickly to debris, stopped traffic, or other obstructions in the road.

If your descent is full of twists and turns, your entire face should pointed in the direction you want the bike to go—in other words, turn your head and scan the road instead of just looking to the side with your eyes. Your body’s alignment will allow the bike to follow your view.

It’s Okay to Brake

“The more experienced you become at descending, the less you will need to brake,” says Wilkinson. “However, I would recommend riding the brakes the first time.”

When your descent makes you nervous, squeeze your brakes gently until you’re at a speed that’s more comfortable. Unless it’s an emergency, avoid fast and hard braking, as it increases the risk of crashing and wears out brake components faster.

RELATED: Head (Indoors!) For The Hills

Take the Lane

A bike lane isn’t always guaranteed, especially on mountain passes. When there’s a car on one side and a steep drop-off on the other, hugging the shoulder can be terrifying. Whenever it’s safe to do so, take the lane.

“Since you’re going faster, every inch of road counts,” says Wilkinson. “For really steep descents with low traffic, it’s fair game to take the whole lane, as you’re probably reaching car-like speeds anyway.”

This extra pavement is especially important when turning. Wilkinson instructs descending cyclists to swing as wide as possible going into the turn, get as close to the apex as possible, then exit the turn on the wide angle. This will allow you to take the straightest line through the turn, minimizing the risk of a high-speed crash.

Flat Advice

Getting a flat tire on a descent can be dangerous, especially if the bike is traveling at high speed. A level head is imperative in this situation, says Wilkinson:

“Stay calm, keep rolling in a straight line if possible, and come to a stop at the next safe spot out of the way from other bikes and cars.”

Weather the Wind

Slicing through the air on a downhill is one thing—crosswinds are an entirely different monster to a skittish descender. To minimize the impact of being blown in all directions, Wilkinson says to eliminate anything that might cause a “parachute effect.”

“Shallow depth wheels will help tremendously, especially on the front wheel. I always choose shallow over deep when I’m on a course with a serious descent. Other than that, make sure your jersey is zipped up and nothing is hanging out of your pockets.”

Practice Makes Perfect

With time and practice, nervous riders can learn to master—and even appreciate— the descent. With more comfort comes an added bonus: more speed.

“Even in the pro peloton, there is a wide stratification when it comes to descending skill. It’s all about how much risk you are willing to take,” says Wilkinson. “As you gain more and more experience, you’ll learn your boundaries and you’ll see your times drop more and more.”

RELATED: Climbing Tips For Triathletes From Maik Twelsiek

The post Don’t Dread The Descent! appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>