Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com Triathlon Training, Gear, Nutrition, Photos, Race Results & Calendars Wed, 30 Jul 2014 23:09:30 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.5.2 2014 Ironman Boulder Start List http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/race-coverage/2014-ironman-boulder-start-list_103207 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/race-coverage/2014-ironman-boulder-start-list_103207#comments Wed, 30 Jul 2014 21:05:32 +0000 Liz Hichens http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=103207

Photo: Nick Salazar

The inaugural 2014 Ironman Boulder is set for this Sunday, Aug. 3.

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Photo: Nick Salazar

The inaugural 2014 Ironman Boulder is set for this Sunday, Aug. 3. See the complete pro start list below:

Men’s Start List
1 Richie Cunningham (AUS)
2 Justin Daerr (USA)
4 Scott Defilippis (USA)
5 Mark Hillers (USA)
6 Karol Kristov (EST)
7 Jared Milam (USA)
8 Joe Umphenour (USA)
10 Dantley Young (USA)
11 Steven Zawaski (USA)
12 Kyle Buckingham (RSA)
13 Fabio Carvalho (BRA)

RELATED – Dispatch: Rebekah Keat’s Running Tips

Women’s Start List
18 Uli Bromme (USA)
19 Carrie Lester (AUS)
20 Christine Hammond (USA)
21 Laura Bennett (USA)
22 Danielle Kehoe (USA)
23 Morgan Chaffin (USA)
24 Alyssa Godesky (USA)
25 Olesya Prystayko (UKR)

RELATED: Locals Pack The Podium At 70.3 Boulder

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Why You’re Cramping On The Run http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/nutrition/dealing-cramping-run_103210 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/nutrition/dealing-cramping-run_103210#comments Wed, 30 Jul 2014 20:59:11 +0000 Lauren Antonucci http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=103210

Photo: Shutterstock.com

In a long-course race, I felt super tired and my muscles cramped up two-thirds of the way into the run, despite drinking tons of fluid.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

Q: In a recent long-course race, I felt super tired and my muscles cramped up two-thirds of the way into the run, despite drinking tons of fluid. Where did I go wrong?

A: I’m pretty sure you failed to take in enough sodium during your long-course race. Although I’m sure you’ve heard of the dangers of both under-hydrating and hyponatremia (over-hydrating, or diluting your electrolytes), the entire topic of hydrating can be very confusing to even the smartest of triathletes. You can still become dehydrated despite adequate fluid intake if you’re not keeping your sodium balance in check. It is likely that you took in too little sodium, and I recommend you increase your intake of sodium before and during your next long training or race. Increase your sports drink consumption to at least 50–75 percent of your total fluid intake during your training and race. Use an endurance sports drink (with 200 milligrams of sodium per 8 ounces versus the usual 110). I would also recommend you conduct a few sweat tests to more accurately determine your sweat rate and help ensure you are drinking the correct amount. Finally, add electrolyte tabs as needed until you are drinking enough fluid to nearly match your sweat rate. The combination of adequate total fluid and much-needed sodium will help propel you to a strong and safe finish in your next race.

RELATED: Get Serious About Sodium

More Nutrition Q&As.

Lauren Antonucci, R.D., is a board-certified specialist in sports dietetics, three-time Ironman finisher and the founding director of Nutrition Energy in New York City.

The 2014 Events DC Nation’s Triathlon is set for Sept. 7, 2014. Learn about the all-new sprint race and relay options at Nationstri.com.

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Racing Weight: Beverage Consumption And Weight Management http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/nutrition/racing-weight-beverage-consumption-and-weight-management-3_35534 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/nutrition/racing-weight-beverage-consumption-and-weight-management-3_35534#comments Wed, 30 Jul 2014 19:18:25 +0000 Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=35534

Learn how cutting wasteful beverage calories from your diet is one of the easiest and most effective ways to get lean for peak performance.

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Racing Weight author Matt Fitzgerald explains how cutting wasteful beverage calories from your diet is one of the easiest and most effective ways to manage your overall caloric intake and get lean for peak performance.

More Racing Weight advice.

The 2014 Events DC Nation’s Triathlon is set for Sept. 7, 2014. Learn about the all-new sprint race and relay options at Nationstri.com.

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Back Pain Treatment, Exercises And Prevention http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/training/back-pain-treatment-exercises-prevention_103194 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/training/back-pain-treatment-exercises-prevention_103194#comments Wed, 30 Jul 2014 17:20:43 +0000 Jordan D. Metzl, M.D. http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=103194

Photo: iStock

Nothing can derail your training like back pain—address the weaknesses at the source to avoid unnecessary downtime and discomfort.

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Photo: iStock


Nothing can derail your training like back pain—address the weaknesses at the source to avoid unnecessary downtime and discomfort.

The Symptoms

Muscular back pain usually comes on instantly. Pain radiates from both sides of the spine and the muscles feel as though they’re locked up. It can be severe and debilitating.

What’s Going On In There?

Muscular back pain is the most common type of back pain. It involves the paraspinal muscles, which are strong muscles on either side of the spine that enable you to move, twist and bend the spine.

So what brings on the pain? In general, the paraspinous muscles are too tight, too weak or both. A sudden twisting or wrenching, bending forward, and even a direct impact on the muscle can set it off.

RELATED: Preventing Lower Back Pain

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Race Radar: Iowa’s Pigman Triathlon http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/features/race-radar-iowas-pigman-triathlon_103191 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/features/race-radar-iowas-pigman-triathlon_103191#comments Wed, 30 Jul 2014 16:39:54 +0000 Bethany Mavis http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=103191

The Pigman Triathlon is a local favorite and the longest-running race in the region—its long-course race has been around since 1998.

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Located just outside of Cedar Rapids in eastern Iowa, the Pigman Triathlon is a local favorite and the longest-running race in the region—its long-course race has been around since 1998. The name comes from something Iowa is known for around the world: pigs. Organizers expect 600 total athletes this August—400 for the half-iron-distance race, and 200 for the Olympic-distance race.

The swim for both the half-iron-distance and Olympic races starts from Pleasant Creek State Park swimming beach, with water typically around 76 degrees. The bike is challenging but scenic, as it winds through Iowa’s scenic, bucolic countryside. The out-and-back run is on a country road with small rolling hills and has little protection from the sun. With the success of the half-iron-distance race, race organizers JMS Racing Services added an Olympic-distance race on the same day and a sprint race in June.

One of the main things that sets this local race apart from other races in the region is a large prize purse—Pigman hands out $4,900 total in cash awards to top elite, age-group, Clydesdale and Athena athletes, as well as the top club (the first-place overall male and female each get $1,250, and the top club receives $250). The prize money keeps the level of competition high—American pro triathlete David Thompson races it year after year, as do top amateur racers. Thompson also enjoys racing Pigman for the consistently accurate swim, bike and run courses; the great post-race food; the abundance of experienced and enthusiastic volunteers; the showers that are available after the race; and the consistently hot and windy conditions—“[It has a] hot, memorable run course you can complain about after you finish—a worthy challenge,” he says. The race’s affordable entry fees and high-quality production also keep athletes coming back year after year, and the timing makes it a great training day for athletes signed up for Ironman Wisconsin.

RELATED: 16 Bucket-List Triathlons (Outside Of Kona)

Details

What: Pigman Triathlon
Where: Pleasant Creek State Park, Iowa
When: Aug. 17, 2014 (also a sprint race June 7, 2015)
Distance: Olympic (1.5K swim, 40K bike, 10K run) and long course (1.2-mile swim, 56-mile bike, 13.1-mile run)
Website: Pigmantri.com

More Race Radars.

If you think your local triathlon should be featured on Triathlete.com, send an email to bmavis@competitorgroup.com with the name of the race, website, and why you think other triathletes should know about it.

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Photos: 2014 Ironman 70.3 Calgary http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/photos/photos-2014-ironman-70-3-calgary_103110 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/photos/photos-2014-ironman-70-3-calgary_103110#comments Wed, 30 Jul 2014 16:23:37 +0000 Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=103110

Athletes swam, bike and ran against a scenic backdrop Calgary, Alberta, Canada at Sunday's Ironman 70.3 Calgary.

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Photos: Matthew Clark

Athletes swam, bike and ran against a scenic backdrop Calgary, Alberta, Canada at Sunday’s Ironman 70.3 Calgary. Andy Potts (USA) and Will Clarke (GBR) battled on the run, with Potts ultimately coming out on top, while Rachel McBride (CAN) dominated the women’s competition to establish a new course record. Read the race recap.

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ProFile: Jan Frodeno http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/features/profile-jan-frodeno_103184 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/features/profile-jan-frodeno_103184#comments Wed, 30 Jul 2014 13:42:32 +0000 As told to Adam Elder http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=103184

Frodeno on his way to the win in Oceanside, Calif. Photo: John David Becker

The man called “Frodissimo” is off to a smashing start in his new long-distance career and has his sights set on the Big Island.

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Frodeno on his way to the win in Oceanside, Calif. Photo: John David Becker

2008 Olympic gold medalist Jan Frodeno is off to a smashing start in his new long-distance career. After retiring from Olympic-distance ITU racing—and its itinerant lifestyle—in 2013 after winning a gold medal for Germany’s mixed relay team at the ITU World Championships, he finished second in the 2013 Ironman 70.3 European Championship in Weisbaden, Germany, then won both the 2014 Ironman 70.3 Asia-Pacific Championship in Auckland in January as well as Ironman 70.3 California Oceanside in March. Earlier this month he finished third at his Ironman debut in Frankfurt. Though he grew up in Germany and South Africa, he and his wife, fellow 2008 Olympic gold medalist Emma Snowsill of Australia, recently relocated to Girona, Spain, as a training hub. The man called “Frodissimo” has his sights ultimately set on the Big Island. (Editor’s note: This interview took place before Ironman Frankfurt)

After many years of training in Germany and now moving to the long distances I needed to find a place where the cycling was so motivating that every day I’d want to do 30K extra. Emma and I went to the south of Switzerland, Italy, the south of France and then Girona—which was recommended by a friend. We found a place that I think is unparalleled in the world in terms of training. It’s obviously known for cycling, but I think the running is better and the swimming is great. So it seems like a fantastic hub.

Initially my coffee addiction started because I saw one of those all-in-one espresso machines that grinds up the beans and looks authentic, and I thought, ‘Wow, my kitchen has got to have one of these things.’ It was five days out from the European champs in 2005. I wanted the machine so badly that I went and got it to kind of put the pressure on me to earn the prize money! I got fifth, which was my greatest result up to then, and that sort of paid for it double or triple.

The team manager from Sram and I sat down to look at what we could do as a marketing gag and created Frodissimo, which is a nickname given to me by the 2007 world champion, Daniel Unger. We thought, ‘Oh, that’s a really cool name for a coffee bean as well!’ So we started trying out different coffee beans, thereby creating Frodissimo [coffee]. My love for coffee goes for three times a day, every day. I’ll test my way around and try different beans, but yeah—three espressos a day.

I’m generally pretty active. I love it when I get a chance to surf or to be on a standup paddleboard. I love mountain biking, and apart from the sporty thing, I really love cooking and of course eating. Which is probably one of the coolest things about going long! I no longer have to diet. I love it. I reckon that could be part of the secret recipe to my success. I don’t have to diet anymore so I’m a happy guy.

RELATED PHOTOS: 2014 Ironman 70.3 St. George

You see a lot of long-course guys come from short course, so they obviously take what they’ve learned with them, and as much as everybody complains about federations, the organization and the science that they bring into training are things that benefit everybody. And I definitely think that since I’ve just changed from that system I bring a lot of that knowledge that’s been passed on to me from the national coaches and the program: whether it’s training to power, or the science of how to break down the run. Whereas for many long-course guys—at least that I know over the years—they just go, ‘Today’s Sunday, so let’s go for a long ride,’ rather than listening to your body more and adapting the training to what could be right for you on the day.

I wanted to race my first full-distance at home, in front of the home crowd, because that always helps. I just believe in going to the bigger races so you know where you stand. You get a realistic idea of where this whole thing can go, rather than going to some event at the end of the year that’s not really on the radar. I think Frankfurt is definitely one of the bigger ones apart from Kona, so it’ll be a good gauge.

Will I miss ITU racing? Totally. You make a lot of friends, and the whole organization of it, the whole professionalism around the races I’m definitely going to miss. It starts off with the podium—it is properly cool. You get the champagne and everybody’s there and it’s a party, whereas that usually doesn’t happen at the 70.3 races. Not the ones I’ve been to. Just a lot of small things.

I certainly love the bike part of triathlon. That’s something that with the time-trial positioning I’ve really come to enjoy. But when you have a good day running there’s nothing more beautiful than floating along for 20K or whatever it is. Which actually doesn’t happen all that often, even to the best of us! And the swimming, which I downright used to hate, I’ve found a really good swim school now and it’s turned out to be great. It goes from a chore to something I enjoy.

It’s really good to have a soul mate who understands what your job and what your life is all about. All traveling sounds great for a bit—but you’re on the road for pretty much 10 months of the year, and living out of a bag the whole time loses the romantic factor quite soon. It’s great to have somebody who knows what our life is about. And to share it with.

RELATED PHOTOS: 2014 Ironman 70.3 California

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2014 Wetsuit Performance Test http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/gear-tech/wetsuit-performance-test_103117 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/gear-tech/wetsuit-performance-test_103117#comments Tue, 29 Jul 2014 20:40:41 +0000 Aaron Hersh http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=103117

Photo: Nils Nilsen

Using patented technology developed for the U.S. Olympic swim team, we rigorously tested wetsuits of every type for speed and comfort.

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Photo: Nils Nilsen

Using patented technology developed for the U.S. Olympic swim team, we rigorously tested wetsuits of every type for speed and comfort.

Fit is the most important attribute of any triathlon wetsuit—it must conform to your body and feel right. But the boost it provides to your stroke is also important, especially when chasing a PR or trying to conserve energy during a long race. Some wetsuits are faster than others, and the difference can’t be perceived in the water or measured with a stopwatch. Triathlete tapped an Olympic sports scientist to quantify the speed gained from nine top wetsuits. Comfort is critical, so the suits were also tested for feel in the water. Here’s how they performed.

The 2014 Events DC Nation’s Triathlon is set for Sept. 7, 2014. Learn about the all-new sprint race and relay options at Nationstri.com.

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Recovery: The Benefits Of Massage For Athletes http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/features/recovery-the-benefits-of-massage-for-athletes_37148 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/features/recovery-the-benefits-of-massage-for-athletes_37148#comments Tue, 29 Jul 2014 18:00:58 +0000 Triathlete.com http://running.competitor.com/2011/08/videos/recovery-the-benefits-of-massage-for-athletes_35660

Regular massage is a great way to foster recovery and provide feedback on how your training is working.

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In this video, Sage Rountree explains the different types of massage available to endurance athletes. Regular massage is a great way to foster recovery and provide feedback on how your training is working.

We’ve gone digital! Sign up for a digital subscription of Triathlete to get our monthly issues for your digital device. In addition to the regular monthly content you’ll get exclusive videos, photos and more embedded in your issue.

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Eat Right: 6 Smart Snacks http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/nutrition/eat-right-6-smart-snacks_69554 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/nutrition/eat-right-6-smart-snacks_69554#comments Tue, 29 Jul 2014 16:55:55 +0000 Pip Taylor http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=69554

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Next time you’re hungry in between meals or need a quick pre- or post-training snack, opt for one of these.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

While snack foods might be convenient, the packaged and processed options tend to encourage more snacking while not adding much nutrient-wise. Next time you’re hungry in between meals or need a quick pre- or post-training snack, opt for one of these.

7 oz Greek yogurt + half-cup fresh blueberries (200 calories)
High in protein, natural fats and probiotics, Greek yogurt is a staple in many athletes’ kitchens. Stick to a natural, full-fat yogurt (to better satiate) and add your own sweetness and antioxidant boost by topping with fresh blueberries, which have also been shown to support heart, brain and eye health.

1 oz corn chips + 2 oz guacamole (200 calories)
Chips and dip might feel indulgent, but this classic combo (in moderation) should be enjoyed guilt-free. Avocadoes, packed with healthy fats, vitamins K, C and E plus potassium and magnesium, are highly nutritious and satisfying. For the best quick guacamole, combine mashed avocado, cilantro, lime juice, chili powder, salt and pepper. Serve with a handful of natural corn chips or veggie sticks.

1 oz cheese + 1 medium pear (200 calories)
This sweet and salty combo also makes for a great pre- or post-workout snack with the carbohydrate-rich pear and small amount of protein and fats from the cheese. Go with a full-flavored natural cheddar for maximum flavor and nutrition.

2 stalks of celery + 1.5 T almond butter (170 calories)
Celery sticks and peanut butter might be a classic pairing, but almond butter is rich in vitamin E, manganese and magnesium as well as being high in protein and healthy fats. Crunchy celery is packed with vitamin K and fiber.

4 salmon nigiri (180 calories)
Supermarket sushi can make a great meal or the perfect athlete snack. Packed with carbohydrates, protein and omega-3 fats, sushi makes a convenient and low-calorie option. A low-cal veggie alternative is the cucumber roll (133 calories).

3 oz chicken + 1 T mayo + 1 lettuce leaf (190 calories)
Baked, smoked or poached, chicken is a smart go-to snack for warding off hunger, as protein is the most satiating of the macronutrients. Have it by itself, or for more flavor add a little mayo or mustard and wrap into a lettuce leaf.

RELATED: Greek Yogurt 10 Ways

The 2014 Events DC Nation’s Triathlon is set for Sept. 7, 2014. Learn about the all-new sprint race and relay options at Nationstri.com.

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Ironman Louisville To Move To October In 2015 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/news/ironman-louisville-move-october-2015_103103 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/news/ironman-louisville-move-october-2015_103103#comments Tue, 29 Jul 2014 16:28:14 +0000 Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=103103

Photo: Larry Rosa/Endurapix

The 2015 Ironman Louisville triathlon presented by Norton Sports Health will move from August to Oct. 11 in 2015.

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Photo: Larry Rosa/Endurapix

The 2015 Ironman Louisville triathlon presented by Norton Sports Health will move from August to Oct. 11 in 2015—promising to provide athletes with cooler race temperatures in the fall.

“The date shift of Ironman Louisville will provide athletes with more comfortable air and water temperatures—improving race conditions and the overall athlete experience. We look forward to continuing to work with the incredible people of Louisville to deliver this first-class event,” said Andrew Messick, Chief Executive Officer of Ironman.

The unique, mostly down-river swim course was the first rolling start swim in Ironman racing, while the scenic bike course goes through La Grange, where thousands of spectators cheer on the athletes in a Tour de France-like atmosphere. The run course passes Churchill Downs, home of the famous Kentucky Derby, and the University of Louisville, so there’s no shortage of attraction for athletes.

Read more: Ironman.com

RELATED: How To Have A Successful Ironman Louisville Race

The 2014 Events DC Nation’s Triathlon is set for Sept. 7, 2014. Learn about the all-new sprint race and relay options at Nationstri.com.

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Photos: Mixed Relay Action From Glasgow http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/photos/photos-mixed-relay-action-glasgow_103058 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/photos/photos-mixed-relay-action-glasgow_103058#comments Tue, 29 Jul 2014 16:15:37 +0000 Liz Hichens http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=103058

In mixed relay’s debut at the Glasgow Commonwealth Games, England put together a fiery race to garner gold.

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In mixed relay’s debut at the Glasgow Commonwealth Games, England put together a fiery race to garner gold with the team of Jodie Stimpson, Jonathan Brownlee, Vicky Holland and Alistair Brownlee. Read the recap here. The International Triathlon Union (ITU) is working to make the Mixed Relay team format part of the Olympic program. The unique race features a man-woman-man relay race, with each athlete completing a 250m swim, 6km bike and 1.6km run.

The 2014 Events DC Nation’s Triathlon is set for Sept. 7, 2014. Learn about the all-new sprint race and relay options at Nationstri.com.

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Get In The (Pre-Race) Zone http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/training/get-in-the-pre-race-zone_62417 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/training/get-in-the-pre-race-zone_62417#comments Tue, 29 Jul 2014 13:21:01 +0000 Mackenzie Lobby http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=62417

An athlete prepares to race at ITU WTS Hamburg. Photo: Janos Schmidt/Triathlon.org

The importance of eliminating pre-race distractions, plus how to visualize race-day success.

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An athlete prepares to race at ITU WTS Hamburg. Photo: Janos Schmidt/Triathlon.org

The importance of eliminating pre-race distractions, plus how to visualize race-day success.

A study published in the European Journal of Applied Physiology confirms the delicate interplay between mind and body when it comes to physical performance (see the complete study here). Researchers at Michigan Technological University sought to prove that physical capacity was negatively affected by mental workload. To do this they had participants perform shoulder exercises while simultaneously answering math questions, with a control group who solely focused on the physical task. Perhaps unsurprisingly to anyone who has ever been mentally distracted during a workout, the arithmetic group tended to lose strength and fatigue more quickly than the control group.

Whether it’s a math problem, a work problem or a family problem that’s nagging you, most athletes can attest to the fact that life’s distractions take a toll on performance. “Total absorption in the task at hand allows us to more likely experience flow and reach peak performance,” explains sports psychologist Dr. Cindra Kamphoff, who works with athletes on mental training techniques at The Runner’s Edge in Mankato, Minn. “Performance requires us to be totally present in the here and now—if we aren’t, we won’t be at our best.”

The concept of “flow” is that feeling of complete enthrallment in the task you’re performing. One of the most effective ways to enter into the flow state is through a tried and true pre-race and pre-workout routine. In establishing this routine, you create a sense of predictability prior to competition so you are less likely to be distracted.

“A pre-race routine can get you to focus on the factors that help you, and minimize the factors that don’t,” says Kamphoff. She advises athletes to “leave everything at the door” and enter into competition mode, which all starts with that routine. She also suggests spending a few moments focusing on the performance itself. “Practicing imagery can help improve mental focus during a workout or race,” she says. Indeed, this is a learned skill that must be trained in the weeks leading up to a big race. While you can’t control everything on the big day, a tactical approach to establishing focus will give you a leg up on the competition.

RELATED – Psych Out: Dealing With Race-Day Anxiety

Pre-Race Routine

Rehearse your routine prior to hard workouts to make sure each element is dialed in. Eat the same breakfast, listen to the same mix and organize your gear in the same manner. Continue hydrating and practice your warm-up. This way you’ll know your body will be adequately fueled, your mind will be primed, and you won’t discover you’re missing equipment when you reach the transition area.

Pre-Race Visualization

A couple of weeks leading up to competition, spend 5–10 minutes a day visualizing your race. Break it down into the following segments:

1. The start. Picture yourself standing at the line, surrounded by the competition. Imagine embracing the feelings of excitement and anticipation.

2. The early sections of the bike. You’ll feel full of energy, so remind yourself not to become overzealous in your pace. At this point, it’s just about enjoying the ride.

3. The latter sections of the run. Dig deep and imagine breaking through the wall.

4. The finish. See yourself successfully running across the timing mats. Imagine how it will feel to reach your goals.

RELATED: Coping With Pre-Race Nerves

The 2014 Events DC Nation’s Triathlon is set for Sept. 7, 2014. Learn about the all-new sprint race and relay options at Nationstri.com.

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USAT Super Sprint Series Returns To Las Vegas http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/news/usat-super-sprint-series-returns-las-vegas_103052 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/news/usat-super-sprint-series-returns-las-vegas_103052#comments Mon, 28 Jul 2014 21:45:27 +0000 Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=103052

Photo: Aaron Hersh

The race will feature a $70,000 prize purse and will again coincide with the Interbike trade show.

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Photo: Aaron Hersh

The race, designated as the 2014 USA Triathlon Elite Sprint National Championships, will feature a $70,000 prize purse and will again coincide with the Interbike trade show.

RELATED PHOTOS: 2013 Super Sprint Triathlon Grand Prix – Men’s Race

RELATED PHOTOS: 2013 Super Sprint Triathlon Grand Prix – Women’s Race

Read the announcement from USA Triathlon below:

USA Triathlon, in conjunction with KANGA Productions, is pleased to announce the 2014 USA Triathlon Super Sprint Series will return to the Las Vegas Convention Center on Thursday, Sept. 11. The event, officially designated as the 2014 USA Triathlon Elite Sprint National Championships, will offer $70,000 in prize money to top elite triathletes in a thrilling, spectator-friendly format.

Featuring the growing super-sprint format, professional triathletes will complete two continuous, non-stop circuits of the same course, including a 300-meter pool swim, 8-kilometer bike and 2.5-kilometer run. Qualifying heats will be held throughout the morning, with finals set to begin at 6 p.m. PT. For the second year in a row, Universal Sports Network will televise the event to a nationwide audience on Oct. 1 at 8 p.m. ET.

The invitation-only elite field, consisting of 30 men and 30 women, will compete for a total of $70,000 in prize money, more than double the amount awarded at this event in 2013. A $62,500 prize purse will be shared equally between the overall men’s and women’s fields, with the winners earning $10,000. The top 15 finishers will earn a portion of the overall prize purse. Additionally, $7,500 will be shared among the top three U.S. men and women for the Elite Sprint Nationals podium.

“Las Vegas was an ideal location for the USA Triathlon Super Sprint Series last fall, and we’re ecstatic to bring this event back to Las Vegas again this year,” said Rob Urbach, USA Triathlon CEO. “Spectators will see the best draft-legal talent competing under lights near the strip at night, due in part to the prize money we’re able to offer the field. This is a must-see event for all.”

This is the second consecutive year that the USA Triathlon Super Sprint Series is contested in Las Vegas. The race will take place during Interbike, the largest annual cycling trade show in North America, allowing endurance industry leaders to experience the engaging course design firsthand. In 2013, Gwen Jorgensen (St. Paul, Minn.), currently ranked No. 1 in the world, captured victory at the Las Vegas event, while Australian Peter Kerr won the overall men’s title.

To be eligible for invitation, athletes must be a current USA Triathlon elite license holder or an international professional. A minimum of 50 percent of the field will be reserved for U.S. athletes, providing an opportunity for the nation’s emerging and Olympic-level triathletes to enhance draft-legal cycling skills and race tactics.

Visit Usatriathlon.org/ss14lasvegas for more information.

RELATED: Why The Super Sprint Matters

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Photos: Limkemann, Kessler Win Challenge New Albany http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/photos/photos-limkemann-kessler-win-challenge-new-albany_103027 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/photos/photos-limkemann-kessler-win-challenge-new-albany_103027#comments Mon, 28 Jul 2014 21:35:29 +0000 Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=103027

Over 1000 participants competed in the inaugural Challenge New Albany over the weekend.

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The United States’ Eric Limkemann bested a strong men’s field which included uber biker Andrew Starykowicz and Australia’s Leon Griffin in the inaugural Challenge New Albany. Limkemann used the fourth-fastest swim (22:51), the day’s fastest bike split of 2:07:14 and the sixth fastest run (1:18:43) to win soundly in 3:50:30.Griffin was second in 3:56:16, followed by Starykowicz, who suffered a crash on the bike, in third in 3:56:35.

On the women’s side, Meredith Kessler used the fastest swim (24:21) and bike (2:24:57) splits to exit T2 with a slight lead over Jennifer Spieldenner. Kessler and Spieldenner were shoulder to shoulder as they entered the hot corner in downtown New Albany less than a half mile into the race. Kessler’s third-fastest (1:27:32) run was good enough to pull away from Spieldnner for the win in 4:19:02. Spieldenner hung tough for second in 4:23:14 and Julian Petersen (4:24:08), Haley Chura (4:29:58) and Carly Johann (4:33:01) rounded out the top five.

Over 1000 participants competed in the inaugural Challenge New Albany over the weekend.

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First Pro Kona Slots To Be Handed Out This Week http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/news/first-pro-kona-slots-handed-week_103017 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/news/first-pro-kona-slots-handed-week_103017#comments Mon, 28 Jul 2014 20:24:55 +0000 Liz Hichens http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=103017

The entire women's podium (Rachel Joyce, Mirinda Carfrae and Liz Blatchford) will return. Photo: John David Becker

Find out which professional triathletes have secured their spots on the start line of the 2014 Ironman World Championship, set for Oct. 11.

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The entire women's podium (Rachel Joyce, Mirinda Carfrae and Liz Blatchford) will return. Photo: John David Becker


With the 2014 Ironman World Championship 75 days away, the first professional spots for the men and women will be handed out this week.

The Kona Pro Rankings (KPR) system was put into place in the fall of 2010 and requires professionals to be ranked against each other based on their finishes at 70.3 and Ironman events around the world. The top ranked 50 men and 35 women in the standings earn starts at the iconic race. A handful of athletes are considered automatic qualifiers and don’t count in the overall rankings. Athletes who have won the Ironman World Championship in the last five years, or who have won the Ironman 70.3 World Championship and Hy-Vee 5150 U.S. Championship in 2013 automatically earn spots in Kona. All athletes, including automatic qualifiers, must validate their start in Kona with a finish at a full Ironman event.

This week marks the end of the first qualifying period, and 40 men and 28 women, plus the automatic qualifiers, will be offered the opportunity to register given that they have validated. If a person has not validated or chooses not to accept his/her slot, it will roll down to the next eligible athlete. The remaining 17 spots (10 men and seven women) will be handed out at the end of August.

Automatic Qualifiers

Frederik Van Lierde (BEL), Pete Jacobs (AUS) and Craig Alexander (AUS) have each won the Ironman World Championship in the last five years and have all validated with an Ironman finish. Though Alexander had previously said he will not return to compete in Kona, he will be offered a slot and told Firstoffthebike.com he will make a final decision by the end of August. Chris McCormack (AUS) is also eligible for a spot based on his 2012 Ironman world championship win, but he has not validated and has not said he intends to compete this year. Sebastian Kienle (GER) also earns a spot based on his 70.3 World Championship win and his validation. Javier Gomez (ESP) won Hy-Vee, but did not validate and has not expressed any intention of racing in Kona this year.

For the women, Mirinda Carfrae (AUS) is an automatic qualifier and has validated. Chrissie Wellington (GBR) and Leanda Cave (GBR) are both automatic qualifiers based on Kona wins. Wellington has retired from the sport, but Cave has Kona on her racing schedule so don’t be surprised if she pops up on the start list for an August Ironman. Melissa Hauschildt (AUS) has a spot locked up thanks to her win at the Ironman 70.3 World Championships. Like Gomez, Hy-Vee winner Emma Moffatt (AUS) has been busy on the ITU circuit and it does not appear she will validate her Kona slot.

RELATED PHOTOS: 2013 Ironman World Championship – Men’s Race

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Ironman Finisher Documents Training Journey http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/video/ironman-finisher-documents-training-journey_103014 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/video/ironman-finisher-documents-training-journey_103014#comments Mon, 28 Jul 2014 19:40:31 +0000 Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=103014

Sterling Morris signed up for Ironman Ceour d'Alene and made a goal to shoot, cut and produce a video about his training journey to the

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As part of his 2014 New Year’s Resolutions, Sterling Morris decided to compete in an Ironman. He signed up for Ironman Ceour d’Alene and made a goal to shoot, cut and produce a video about his training journey to the start line.

“Completing a 140.6 triathlon is hard—it’s very hard,” Morris told Triathlete.com. “I produced the video to illustrate the amount of training and planning that is involved in completing a major goal. I also produced the video in an attempt to inspire viewers to set their own ‘big, hairy, audacious goals.’”

Watch the resulting video above.

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Is The Paleo Diet Right For Triathletes? http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/nutrition/is-the-paleo-diet-right-for-triathletes_81073 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/nutrition/is-the-paleo-diet-right-for-triathletes_81073#comments Mon, 28 Jul 2014 19:29:44 +0000 Kelly O’Mara http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=81073

Photo: Shutterstock.com

It lacks grains, processed sugars and starches, but the paleo diet has its advantages for athletes.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

It lacks grains, processed sugars and starches, but the paleo diet has its advantages for athletes.

After Nell Stephenson contracted a parasite during an Ironman race in 2004, she took the medication prescribed, but for months continued to feel worse. Though Stephenson had always eaten healthy foods, it turned out she had developed a gluten-intolerance and stomach problems.

Stephenson decided to try the Paleo diet—a diet that mimics what people would have eaten naturally during the Paleolithic Period, before the Agricultural Revolution.

“I felt better in three days,” says Stephenson, a trainer and nutritional coach who now runs a popular Paleo informational blog, Paleoista, and has come out with a book of the same name.

Paleo has been growing in popularity among the general community. But its basic tenets seemed to counter to the traditional carbo-loading of runners and endurance athletes. Paleo prescribes a diet of just lean protein, healthy fat, and fresh fruits and vegetables. Dairy, grains, legumes, and refined and processed food are completely avoided.

RELATED: Should You Eat Like A Caveman?

While most athletes eat lean protein and fresh fruits and vegetables (or, at least, they know they should), many still rely heavily on grains, processed sugars and lots of starches.

But athletes can benefit from a Paleo diet with just a few simple adjustments, says Joe Friel, a U.S. Olympic triathlon coach and author the seminal Cyclists’ Training Bible and Triathletes’ Training Bible.

“[Paleo offers] better long-term recovery, due to greater micronutrient content [than a standard high-starch and sugar diet], allowing the athlete to train with a greater stress load,” Friel said.

Friel and Loren Cordain, PhD, authored the authoritative book on the subject, The Paleo Diet for Athletes, which outlines a couple changes athletes should make to the basic Paleo diet.

The key, said Friel, is dividing an athlete’s diet into stages. During most of an athlete’s meals the basic Paleo diet should be followed, but before, during and immediately after workouts some adjustments could be needed.

About two hours prior to a long or hard workout or race, an athlete should eat food with a low to moderate glycemic index and low fiber content.

During an extended athletic event or race, most athletes will still need quickly-processed carbohydrates in the form of sports drink or gels. Even Stephenson, who eats 100 percent Paleo otherwise, acknowledges that she has to use carbohydrate gels during Ironman races and her husband uses them during ultramarathons. During short events less than an hour, though, an athlete can drink just water.

Eventually, an athlete eating a low-carbohydrate diet will teach their working muscles to utilize more fat stores, which is more efficient and can level out blood sugar fluxuations. Friel reportedly experienced this body change about six to eight weeks after adopting the Paleo diet.

Immediately after an intense or long workout, an athlete should have a recovery drink with carbohydrates and protein in a 4-5:1 ratio. Eating in the short window after a workout is important to ensure that an athlete is recovering and rebuilding muscles.

The few hours after hard exercise is the time to focus on carbohydrates and to possibly eat non-Paleo—starchy foods like bagels or pasta—because the high glucose is needed for the recovery process. The perfect recovery foods in this period, said Friel, are raisins, potatoes and yams.

A lot of problems that athletes have with Paleo come from either not understanding the diet, not planning, or not listening to their bodies. Most importantly, Paleo is not a low-calorie or calorie-restrictive diet — a mistake Stephenson said she’s seen top athletes make.

RELATED: The Imaginary Perfect Diet

Nate Helming, a CrossFit and triathlon coach in San Francisco, tried Paleo for about eight months, but had a hard time eating appropriately for sustained endurance. He was focusing on sweet potatoes, applesauce and dates for energy, but while training 10-15 hours a week, “you have to hit a lot of dates,” he said.

While it’s possible to plan your food intake appropriately, it simply takes more work. Additionally, Helming said, because he was already eating relatively healthy and close to Paleo before, except for some grains and legumes, “I didn’t see a big change.”

But, two of his athletes who tried Paleo lost large amounts of weight—one of them dropping 26 pounds in seven months.

Stephenson also had some athletes who were eating no vegetables and living on electrolyte drinks and sports nutrition bars around the clock come to her for help. For these people, Paleo provides a structure to a healthy diet.

Friel says that most importantly, a Paleo diet—as opposed to a high-starch and sugar diet, like many athletes eat—can have the following effects: more vitamins and antioxidants to keep a strong immune system; increased fat oxidation, which helps long-event endurance; balanced pH levels; and better retained and recovered muscles. All of which makes you faster in the long run.

“My body is functioning optimally,” noted Stephenson.

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About The Author:

Kelly O’Mara is a journalist/reporter and recovering professional triathlete. She lives in the San Francisco Bay Area and writes for a number of magazines, newspapers, and online news sites. And, she eats a lot of brownies.

Get the latest in triathlon training, gear, nutrition and news sent straight to your inbox. Sign up for Triathlete’s newsletter.  

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Video: Prevent Achilles Tendon Strains http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/training/monday-minute-eccentric-calf-raise_10103 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/training/monday-minute-eccentric-calf-raise_10103#comments Mon, 28 Jul 2014 15:50:24 +0000 Triathlete.com http://video.competitor.com/2010/06/running/monday-minute/monday-minute-eccentric-calf-raise/

Tim Crowley and friends demonstrate an effective move for the prevention of calf muscle and Achilles tendon strains.

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Tim Crowley and friends demonstrate an effective move for the prevention of calf muscle and Achilles tendon strains.

More “Monday Minute” exercises.

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Using A Band In Swim Workouts http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/training/using-band-swim-workouts_103001 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/07/training/using-band-swim-workouts_103001#comments Mon, 28 Jul 2014 14:21:10 +0000 Sara McLarty http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=103001

Photo: Nils Nilsen

There’s a reason pros like Jordan Rapp and Lisa Norden are big on swim sets using a band.

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Photo: Nils Nilsen

Add a challenge by bringing a band to your next workout.

There’s a reason pros like Jordan Rapp and Lisa Norden are big on swim sets using a band. It not only takes away the “cheating” of kicking while wearing a buoy during pull sets, but wearing one around your ankles sans buoy can also be a powerful strength builder in the pool. Also, if you find it difficult to hold a buoy between your thighs for a long period of time and tend to get cramps, a band will hold your legs together and effortlessly keep the buoy in place for the entire set.

Training with just a band is very difficult because your feet, legs and hips will sink very low in the water when your ability to kick is completely removed.

Start with a short and simple set like 4×25 with full recovery. When wearing a band, focus on swimming with a fast stroke rate or tempo. The faster you swim, the higher your legs will ride through the water. Using a band is a great drill to help increase arm turnover and develop a “sprint” technique. Improve your horizontal body position by using core and lower back muscles to elevate your hips and legs in the water and avoid using dolphin kicks to move your lower body toward the surface.

When first starting out, avoid using paddles and take plenty of rest, as swimming with a band can increase the pressure on the shoulders and upper back. Start with 25s and build up to 50s when you are able to hold your form and maintain a fast stroke tempo for the entire lap.

You can purchase a band from one of the major swim brands like Speedo or Finis, or you can make your own out of an old bike tube. Cut a punctured tube into thirds and tie the pieces into small loops (about 12–15 inches in diameter).

RELATED – Ask A Pro: Why Do I Hate Everything That Is Good For Me?

Band Sets

- 4x[200 band and buoy on 3:00, 4x50 band only on :60]

- 8×75 on 1:30
(50 free/25 back)

- 24×25 on :30
(4 band only, 2 swim fast, repeat)

RELATED: Four Swim Sets For 70.3 Training

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