Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com Triathlon Training, Gear, Nutrition, Photos, Race Results & Calendars Thu, 30 Oct 2014 17:31:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 How To Run More Efficiently http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/training/how-to-run-more-efficiently_66124 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/training/how-to-run-more-efficiently_66124#comments Thu, 30 Oct 2014 17:06:00 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=66124

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Use less energy to go faster with these tips to improve your efficiency.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

Use less energy to go faster with these tips to improve your efficiency.

While we aren’t all born with the long-limbed, thin bodies of world-class runners, we can maximize what we do have by working on technical efficiency. Focus on these five areas to run more economically:

Stride Length: Over-striding occurs when the foot strikes the ground in front of your center of gravity, which is essentially like putting on the brakes. If you glance down while running and can see your toes way out in front of you, focus on keeping your feet directly below your hips.

Run Cadence: Shoot for a run cadence similar to cycling. Around 85–90 strides per minute is good for taller men, while 90–100 is efficient for smaller athletes. Cadence can be quantified by counting footfall on one leg for one minute.

Forward Motion: Run tall and proud, but don’t bounce. Bouncing causes unnecessary vertical braking forces. Imagine running under a low ceiling: If you bounce too high you’ll bang your head.

Arm Motion: Arms provide some rotational stability, but the movement should not be excessive. Keep elbows bent at approximately 90 degrees, and don’t let your arm swing cross your vertical center line. Arms also drive the legs. The faster you swing your arms, the faster your legs move. Lightly pumping your arms is really helpful for running uphill and sprinting.

Leg Recovery: A slightly bent leg requires less power to bring the leg through during the recovery phase of your run stride. The faster you run, the higher your heel lifts on recovery. Don’t exaggerate heel lift when running at slow speeds. The best triathlon runners have a low, limber gate with a relaxed leg recovery.

RELATED VIDEO: 3 Drills For A Better Running Stride

LifeSport head coach Lance Watson has coached a number of Ironman, Olympic and age-group Champions over the past 25 years. He enjoys coaching athletes of all levels. Join Lance to tackle your first triathlon or perform at a higher level.

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Recipe Of The Week: Curry Chicken Bowl http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/nutrition/recipe-week-curry-chicken-bowl_108789 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/nutrition/recipe-week-curry-chicken-bowl_108789#comments Thu, 30 Oct 2014 16:50:18 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=108789

Here’s a great way to use a rotisserie chicken to make a flavorful meal in less than 30 minutes.

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Here’s a great way to use a rotisserie chicken to make a flavorful meal in less than 30 minutes. Customize the dish by adding the extra veggies from your CSA box or produce drawer and serve over rice, quinoa, or potatoes.

Ingredients

1 rotisserie chicken, all meat removed and roughly chopped
1 tablespoon canola or grape seed oil
2 large carrots, diced
¼ cup celery or fennel, diced
1 yellow onion, diced
2 teaspoon minced garlic
2 teaspoons minced fresh ginger
1 heaping tablespoon yellow curry powder
1 teaspoon cinnamon
¼ teaspoon nutmeg (optional)
1 can diced tomatoes
½ cup dates, pits removed and finely chopped
1 cup dry white wine (Chardonnay works well)
¼ cup toasted slivered almonds
2 tablespoons freshly chopped cilantro

RELATED: Recipes For Recovery

Preparation

1. In a large pot or Dutch/French oven, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the carrots, fennel or celery, and onion and sauté for 5 minutes until golden and softened.
2. Add the garlic and ginger and sauté for one minute until fragrant.
3. Stir in the curry powder, cinnamon, and nutmeg and sauté another minute.
4. Add the chicken to the pot and toss until coated with the garlic, ginger and spices.
5. Add the tomatoes, dates, and white wine and stir to combine, breaking up the dates with a wooden spoon.
6. Cover and let cook on medium-low for 15 minutes.
7. Sprinkle the almonds and cilantro over the top before serving.

More recipes from Jess Cerra.

Jess Cerra is the owner of Fit Food by Jess, a private chef and catering company in Encinitas, Calif. Jess recently launched Harmony Bar, and all natural gluten-and soy free bar designed to tasted like a soft baked cookie. She is an ex-professional XTERRA triathlete and mountain biker, and current elite amateur road cyclist for the SPY GIANT RIDE p/b MRI Endurance team. Follow Jess’ recipes on her “Fit Food by Jess” Facebook page, as well as the “Harmony Bar” Facebook page. Also on twitter @fitfoodbyjess and @harmonybars.

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10 Highlights Of The Future “Triathlete Disneyland,” TriHabitat http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/news/10-highlights-future-triathlete-disneyland-trihabitat_108768 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/news/10-highlights-future-triathlete-disneyland-trihabitat_108768#comments Thu, 30 Oct 2014 13:32:49 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=108768

The TriHabitat facility will span over 1,100 acres in North Carolina.

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We talked with Bill Scott, the CEO of TriHabitat, about his plans for his “Disneyland for Triathletes” slated to be built near Wilmington, N.C., by 2016. Scott has been a triathlete since 1982 and a triathlon race director for 25 years, starting Set Up Events on the east coast.

“It was about 15 years ago that I began to question what we, as a sport, were going to do to move into the future,” Scott says. “We were constantly running into situations where we were losing ability to shut down roads and close down lanes. I’ve had multiple events that we have been pushed out of town because of growth and infrastructure—it gets so expensive to produce some of these races. I started thinking, ‘What if?’”

What he came up with was the TriHabitat facility, which will span over 1,100 acres in North Carolina. Here are some of the cool features that are in the works for the project, which will take 12–14 months once ground is broken.

1. Ultimate swim course. They will be able to control water quality, and the 25-acre lake will have lane ropes and distance markers all around the horseshoe-shaped course.

2. Destination location. With gorgeous beaches, consistently great weather, and a location that’s hallway between New York City and Miami, it’s an easy trip for a lot of triathletes living in multisport hubs.

3. “Better than the Olympics” transition racks. The transition area will be permanent, and each station will have a six-foot pole with a bar to rack your bike, a seat and a hook to hang your wetsuit.

4. Bike rental fleet. The “Bike Barn” will house a collection of high-end rentals and be home to the tech support.

5. Nighttime (or afternoon) races! Because they won’t have to deal with road closures, TriHabitat can start races at anytime, including under the lights at night or at 1 p.m. for the optimal time of day from a temperature perspective.

RELATED: This New Triathlon Facility Looks Insane

6. Spectator friendliest. It’s nearly impossible to view much of a triathlon in normal circumstances, so Scott’s vision was to copy the PGA and create multiple, natural stadiums with elevated mounting so spectators can walk 200 yards from the epicenter and be able to see everything. Plus, spectators can even follow the swim with a sidewalk that will be built around the course.

7. Ideal setup for camps. The 20-room lodge will have a conference room and kitchens with two work stations so multiple groups can prepare meals.

8. Multiple race options. In addition to traditional sprint, Olympic and half-iron distance races, Scott says they’re open to new formats for triathlons as well as running races, bike time trials and open water swim races.

9. Activities for everyone. The venue is also right on a river, so there will be a marina for kayak, paddleboard and jet ski rentals.

10. Smooth surfaces for riding. No more dealing with potholes, cones and various road surfaces. Or even tight corners—the 14-mile loop will be two feet wider than a standard highway and have banked turns.

RELATED: A Triathlete’s Dream Job

Learn more at Trihabitat.com and watch this YouTube video.

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Women’s Collegiate National Championships Debut Sunday http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/news/womens-collegiate-national-championships-debut-sunday_108783 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/news/womens-collegiate-national-championships-debut-sunday_108783#comments Wed, 29 Oct 2014 22:19:09 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=108783

The first-ever race of its kind is set for Sunday, Nov. 2, at Lake Louisa State Park in Clermont, Fla.

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Top triathletes around the country will compete this weekend in the first-ever Women’s Collegiate Triathlon National Championships, set for Sunday, Nov. 2, at Lake Louisa State Park in Clermont, Fla.

Race-day action will begin at 10:30 a.m. and athletes will compete on a sprint-distance 750-meter swim, 20-kilometer bike, 5-kilometer run course within the park. The draft-legal competition structure and rules will be used at the collegiate level when triathlon is granted official NCAA sport status.

Athletes on the start list were invited to compete based on results from the 2014 USA Triathlon Collegiate Club National Championships and the 2014 Junior Elite rankings. Additionally, invitations were sent to athletes who may not be affiliated with a collegiate or junior club team and have posted competitive times in previous draft-legal events. Nearly 20 teams will be represented.

UCLA’s Kelly Kosmo, who finished third at the Draft-Legal Collegiate Championships and 11th in the traditional Olympic-distance race at Collegiate Club Nationals earlier this year, highlights the start list. Also on the start list are women who finished within the top 20 percent of the Collegiate Club Nationals Olympic-distance event, which featured 451 female finishers. Those athletes include Bria Edwards (Penn State), Stephanie Murphy (U.S. Naval Academy), Savannah Dearden (UCSB) and Hannah Dalsing (Northern Arizona).

&ead more about these athletes and this weekend’s event at usatriathlon.org

RELATED PHOTOS: 2014 USAT Collegiate Nationals

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Relieve Nerves With Breathing Techniques http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/training/recovery-breath-exercises_16612 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/training/recovery-breath-exercises_16612#comments Wed, 29 Oct 2014 21:33:09 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/2011/09/videos/recovery-breath-exercises_17822

Get nervous before a race or hard workout? Learn to relax with these great exercises.

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In this video Sage Rountree explains how breathing has a direct physical effect on your mind and body. She also offers examples of exercises you can use to feel calmer and more relaxed before races and hard workouts–portable recovery tools that can be very powerful.

More recovery tips.

We’ve gone digital! Sign up for a digital subscription of Triathlete to get our monthly issues for your digital device. In addition to the regular monthly content you’ll get exclusive videos, photos and more embedded in your issue.

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5 Essential Pre-Ride Checks http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/gear-tech/5-essential-pre-ride-checks_108763 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/gear-tech/5-essential-pre-ride-checks_108763#comments Wed, 29 Oct 2014 21:21:16 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=108763

Photo: John David Becker

Keep your bike in ready-to-roll condition with this checklist.

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Photo: John David Becker


Keep your bike in ready-to-roll condition with this checklist.

Being aware of the condition of your bike’s moving parts will save you time and money, as neglected parts can be pricey to replace and potentially dangerous if overlooked (think large gash in the sidewall of your tire). Run through this five-point checklist before every ride.

1. Check tire pressure.

In addition to checking how much air is in your tires (it’s personal preference, but it’s best to not let tires get lower than 80–90 psi), you should also examine the shape and condition of the rubber and tread. If the tire looks squared off or if you see any cracks or gashes, it may be time for some new tires.

RELATED: 5 Causes Of A Recurring Flat Tire

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Video: 2014 XTERRA World Championship Highlights http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/video/video-xterra-world-championship-highlights_108765 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/video/video-xterra-world-championship-highlights_108765#comments Wed, 29 Oct 2014 17:39:39 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=108765

A short highlight video from the 2014 XTERRA World Championships.

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Spain’s Ruben Ruzafa claimed his third XTERRA world title, while Bermuda’s Flora Duffy continued her dominance of the 2014 season and grabbed her first world crown. Watch a short highlight video above.

Read the race recap.

PHOTOS: 2014 XTERRA World Championships

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5 Steps To Prevent Ear Infection http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/training/5-steps-prevent-ear-infection_108759 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/training/5-steps-prevent-ear-infection_108759#comments Wed, 29 Oct 2014 16:51:20 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=108759

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Otitis externa can be both painful and a training deterrent.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

Your five-step plan to prevent ear infections.

Otitis externa, commonly known as “swimmer’s ear” due to its prevalence in swimmers, can be both painful and a training deterrent. Do your best to prevent ear infections with this five-step plan from Dr. Douglas Hetzler, a triathlete and ear, nose and throat specialist with Palo Alto Medical Foundation.

1. Earplugs (whether custom-made or from a drugstore) decrease the risk of infections. Wear a silicone swim cap over the ears for an additional layer of protection.

2. Use a mixture of equal parts rubbing alcohol and white vinegar in each ear canal after water exposure (swimming, an extra sweaty run or showering). The rubbing alcohol evaporates retained water, and vinegar suppresses bacterial growth.

3. If you listen to tunes while you train, clean your earbuds with white vinegar after a few wears.

4. Skip the Q-tips: “If a person is aggressively cleaning his ears with cotton swabs and removes the protective wax layer, he may increase his chance of ear canal skin infection,” Hetzler says.

5. Call your doctor if you have extreme discomfort in the ear canal; swelling in the skin on the face, cheek, neck or earlobe; or your symptoms last more than a week.

RELATED: Swim Healthy

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Your Diet After The Last Triathlon Of The Year http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/nutrition/your-diet-after-the-last-triathlon-of-the-year_41744 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/nutrition/your-diet-after-the-last-triathlon-of-the-year_41744#comments Wed, 29 Oct 2014 16:00:54 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=41744

Photo: Paul Phillips

How should your eating habits change with the race season now behind you?

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Photo: Paul Phillips

How should your eating habits change with the race season now behind you?

Most North American triathletes have now completed their last triathlon of 2014. In most cases that means they’re taking a short break from training and then going into “maintenance-training mode” through the holidays.

Every triathlete knows that training and diet go hand in hand. When you’re training hard for races, you need to maintain a diet that optimally supports performance and recovery. But what should happen to your diet at the present time of year? How should your eating habits change to match up with changes in your training?

Logically, food intake should decrease as training does. Otherwise fat gain is the inevitable result. But human beings are not completely logical. We’re also emotional creatures, and many triathletes feel an emotional desire to reward themselves after completing a season of discipline and restraint by allowing themselves to indulge in some fattening treat foods—fried foods, beer, desserts, whatever your special craving may be.

I believe that a brief, post-season food reward period is a perfectly acceptable practice to engage in. We tend to define health too narrowly—too physically. Sometimes a thing that is unhealthy for your body can be healthy for your mind and spirit, and sometimes what’s healthy for the mind and spirit can trump what’s unhealthy for the body. Cutting yourself some slack with your diet for a week or two after you’ve completed your last race of the year could be the very thing that enables you to stay disciplined in your eating habits for the rest of the year.

They key word is “brief,” however. Your season of feasting and bacchanal should last no longer than your break from training. If you let your bike sit idle, your running shoes lie empty, and your pool pass go unused for two weeks, then eat and drink whatever you want for two weeks and no longer.

RELATED: Healthy Holiday Menu

If you tend to struggle with your weight, you might want to consider doing even less than that. Research has demonstrated that those individuals who maintain significant weight loss most successfully are those who maintain the most consistent eating habits year-round. For some people who struggle with their weight, a “just this once” period of pigging out around the holidays is all too similar to a smoker’s “just this once” cigarette to celebrate a year without smoking.

Okay, so what happens after the off-season break, when you move into maintenance-level training—consistent but much less intensive than the workload you bear at the height of the summer race season?

Two main things. First, your carbohydrate intake should decrease. Carbohydrate is fuel and nothing else. It is not used structurally in the body. Therefore the amount of carbohydrate you need each day is tied directly to your activity level. As your training load goes up, so should you carbohydrate intake. And as your training workload comes down in the off-season, so should your carb consumption. If you’re training four hours a week or less, don’t eat more than 2.75 grams of carbs per pound of body weight daily. If you’re training five to six hours a week, allow yourself 2.75 to 3.25 g/lb. And if you train seven to 10 hours a week even in the off-season, aim for 3.25 to 3.75 grams per pound.

The other thing about your diet that needs to change in the off-season is your total calorie consumption. Unless you actually want to get fat, your daily calorie intake must decrease by an amount roughly matching the reduction in the number of calories you burn daily through training. Fortunately, your lowering of carbohydrate intake can pretty much take care of that. For example, if your training load drops from 10 hours per week to five, and you lower your carb intake from 3.75 g/lb daily to 2.75 g/lb, then you’ve just lowered your total daily energy intake by 600 calories (assuming you weigh 150 lbs and assuming your diet remains otherwise unchanged).

You may be able to trust your appetite to help with this adjustment. Typically, appetite increases and decreases appropriately with training load, so that you will naturally find yourself eating less in the off-season. But not everyone can trust his or her appetite all the time. So you might want to conduct what I call a calorie audit at the start of the off-season—that is, sit down and use online resources such as Calorieking.com to calculate how many calories you burn each day so you can set a calorie intake target that prevents weight gain and doesn’t put you in a hole when it’s time to start training for the 2015 season, which will be here before you know it.

RELATED: Fueling Your Winter Workouts

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Photos: 2014 Life Time Tri Oceanside http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/photos/photos-2014-life-time-tri-oceanside_108478 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/photos/photos-2014-life-time-tri-oceanside_108478#comments Wed, 29 Oct 2014 16:00:20 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=108478

Recap the day of racing at Sunday's Life Time Tri Oceanside.

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Photos: Rich Cruse

Sunday in Oceanside featured several opportunities for professionals to walk away with prize money, with the Life Time Tri Series, Toyota Triple Crown and Oceanside race titles all on the line. Americans Joe Maloy and Alicia Kaye claimed the Life Time Tri Oceanside victories against tough fields featuring several Olympians. American Ben Collins finished fourth to claim the Toyota Triple Crown title. And finally, Kaye and American Cameron Dye repeated as Life Time Tri Series Champions. Overall, a total of $450,000 was handed out at the awards ceremony following the race.

Read the race recap.

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Your Off-Season Swimming Goals http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/training/your-off-season-swimming-goals_66330 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/training/your-off-season-swimming-goals_66330#comments Wed, 29 Oct 2014 14:10:03 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=66330

Alternative motivators for getting in the pool this winter.

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Alternative motivators for getting in the pool this winter.

Every athlete should take a mental and physical break after the race season. But, after a two- to four-week hiatus for rest and recovery, it’s time to dive back in the water with fresh objectives.

Get personal stroke instruction.

Look for private coaching from a knowledgeable and experienced swim coach, specifically with a triathlon focus. Use word-of-mouth recommendations as well as Internet searches. Working with a local coach is advantageous because you can see him or her multiple times and easily schedule a follow-up session a few weeks later. However, if you are traveling for work or pleasure, check if anyone at your destination is renowned for his or her ability to improve technique and efficiency.

RELATED: Get Your Swim Stroke Analyzed

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Orange Is The New Safe: POC Sports’ Apparel Line http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/gear-tech/orange-new-safe-poc-sports-apparel-line_108752 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/gear-tech/orange-new-safe-poc-sports-apparel-line_108752#comments Tue, 28 Oct 2014 20:54:14 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=108752

Photo: John David Becker

The Swedish company’s focus is on high performance and comfort with “proactive safety” in mind.

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Photo: John David Becker

POC Sports’ apparel line is undeniably eye-catching. The Swedish company’s focus is on high performance and comfort with “proactive safety” in mind, and its can’t-miss-it-orange, white and black kits stand out not just for their colors but for their clean, crisp lines and smart details. When you first put it on, the jersey cut feels a little shorter in the front compared to others, but that’s a purposeful move, as it’s made to be most comfortable in a riding position. The entire kit feels incredibly smooth (read: aerodynamic) on, and the fabric is sleek, seamless and stretches easily—it feels noticeably more luxurious than your average bike shop jersey. In addition to all the reflective details, one of the coolest features is the labeled “My Info” pocket where you can store your ID and cell phone, making it obvious where to go if you got into a crash. Our only issue: Although the kit wicks well, you might want a slightly more breathable material for temperatures in the upper 80s or higher.

POC Sports Essential Jersey ($170) and Essential Bib Shorts ($200) | Sizes S–XXL, available in both men’s and women’s, Pocsports.com

RELATED: 12 Pieces Of Clever Gear

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Quiz: Finding The Right Triathlon Coach http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/training/quiz-finding-right-triathlon-coach_108744 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/training/quiz-finding-right-triathlon-coach_108744#comments Tue, 28 Oct 2014 20:37:13 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=108744

Photo: Shutterstock.com

The right coach can take a triathlete’s performance from good to great. What kind of coach is right for you? Take our quiz to find out.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com


What kind of coach is right for you? Take our quiz to find out.

The right coach can take a triathlete’s performance from good to great. But finding the right coach is more than just Googling for someone who lives in the area or qualified for Kona. In your search for a coach, it’s important to look for someone who “speaks your language” and prioritizes the same things as you when it comes to a training plan. Find your best match with this quick quiz:

1. What kind of feedback do you prefer in training?
A: encouragement
B: analytical
C: give it to me straight
D: hands on
E: face to face

2.When I have a bad workout, I:
A: lament on Facebook or Twitter. The replies from my friends always cheer me up!
B: analyze the training data to look at where things went wrong.
C: get back out there and do it again—this time, I’ll get it right.
D: Google. There must be an explanation (and a solution)!
E: take an extra recovery day. It’s not that big of a deal.

3. What’s blaring through your earbuds before a race?
A: “Happy” by Pharrell
B: A voicemail from my coach reviewing the race plan, goal wattages and nutrition schedule.
C: “Thunderstruck” by AC/DC
D: Nothing—I like to find a quiet place in transition, close my eyes and visualize what I’m about to do.
E: A recording of my children singing and laughing.

4. I simply cannot race without:
A: a very loud cheering section. B: my bike computer and heart rate strap.
C: a grimace. I came here to suffer!
D: a comprehensive race plan to perform my very best.
E: my wedding ring.

5. What’s the best compliment you could receive from a fellow triathlete?
A: “You inspire me!”
B: “How do you sustain so many watts?”
C: “You’re a BEAST!”
D: “It’s been fun to watch your progress and improvement in the sport.”
E: “You really seem like you’ve got it together. How do you balance it all?”

6.Why are you a triathlete?
A: I am happier and healthier when I swim, bike and run.
B: I enjoy quantifying my performance and comparing my data to others.
C:I want to see how fast and how hard I can go.
D: It’s fascinating to learn from others—just when I think I know it all, I learn something new from a train- ing partner.
E: To serve as an example of health for my children, spouse, colleagues, and friends.

7. My biggest fear about race day is:
A: that I’m not good enough.
B: a dead battery on my power meter or GPS.
C: not finishing. Not an option!
D: forgetting the things I’ve learned in training.
E: getting called in to work at the last minute.

8. What sounds most like your mantra during tough sessions?
A: “Believe you can, and you will.”
B: “Spin it to win it.”
C: “Shut up, legs!”
D: “Relax the shoulders, engage the core.”
E: “Pain is temporary.”

RELATED: Getting To The Start Line Of Your First Tri

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Yoga Styles For Triathletes http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/training/yoga-styles-for-triathletes_90404 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/training/yoga-styles-for-triathletes_90404#comments Tue, 28 Oct 2014 18:30:56 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=90404

Photo: iStock

Yoga serves as the perfect cross-training for triathletes for its restorative benefits and ability to build body awareness.

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Photo: iStock

Choose the style of yoga that best suits your needs as an athlete.

Yoga serves as the perfect cross-training for triathletes for its restorative benefits and ability to build body awareness.

“When I began practicing yoga, I realized I really was not using my body properly,” says Kona qualifier and certified yoga instructor Allison Woodward. “I was pounding each day on my feet instead of utilizing my feet to make them stronger. I had horrible posture from being hunched over on a bike. I thought my core was strong, but it really wasn’t. Through yoga, I learned how to use each part of my body more efficiently.”

Looking for the best style to suit your needs? Follow this quick guide.

Hatha

Considered an “introduction” to yoga. Basic asanas (poses) and pranayama (breathing techniques) orient students to the postures.

Good for: Increasing range of motion. “Build into it gradually,” cautions Kellye Mills, a USAT Coach and yoga instructor in Woodstock, Ga., “yoga is a practice, not a race.”

Vinyasa

A more fast-paced yoga that uses vinyasas, like sun salutations, to “flow” between each of the poses.

Good for: Cardio, core strength. Woodward says she sees most of her multisport students in Vinyasa classes: “It’s very vigorous and it’s a great workout. It combines a cardiovascular element as well as an emphasis on balance and flexibility.”

RELATED: Four Yoga Poses For Cyclists

Bikram

Known as “hot yoga,” Bikram is a series of 26 poses practiced in a room at or above 100 degrees Fahrenheit and 30 to 60 percent humidity.

Good for: Flexibility, heat adaptation. “Bikram makes for excellent practice for trying to maintain physical strength, endurance and composure in conditions similar to that of racing in the heat,” says Mills.

Ashtanga

The practice evolves through a series of asanas, each more challenging than the last.

Good for: Strength, breath awareness. “Learning how to utilize proper breathing techniques can help dramatically in [triathlon] competition,” says Woodward.

Iyengar

With an emphasis on alignment and precision, students are directed to move within a pose only to correct alignment. Props are used to get the desired benefits from the postures without sacrificing the alignment of the pose.

Good for: Injury prevention. Iyengar places the body in multiple postures requiring stability and training the neuromuscular system to respond appropriately.

Yin

Generally consisting of only four to five asanas per class, students hold poses for extended periods of time, allowing for gentle stretching.

Good for: Recovery after long training days. “Physically, you’re taking the time for the body to send a message to the brain that its hard work is done,” says Mills. “By receiving that message, your body begins all of the processes necessary to begin recovering, which is often the most overlooked portion of triathlon training.”

RELATED – One-Hour Workout: Strength, Cardio And Yoga Fusion

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Tasty Meatless Protein Options http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/nutrition/tasty-meatless-protein-options_108740 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/nutrition/tasty-meatless-protein-options_108740#comments Tue, 28 Oct 2014 17:39:29 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=108740

Legumes are a great source of protein. Photo: Shutterstock.com

Many triathletes are moving toward vegetarian or plant-based diets.

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Legumes are a great source of protein. Photo: Shutterstock.com

Q: What are some tasty meatless protein options?

A: As many triathletes move toward vegetarian or plant-based diets, and because the protein needs of athletes are higher than that of our less active friends, I answer this question often in my practice.

Soy products—including tofu, tempeh and edamame—are high-protein meat alternatives. Tofu can be marinated and grilled, or cooked into a delicious breakfast scramble (add vegetables and salsa for flavor and fiber). Edamame is available both frozen (in the shell and already shelled) and dried for an easy snack. At 20 grams of protein per cup of tofu and 17 grams per cup of edamame, soy is a protein powerhouse.

Legumes (including beans and lentils) are also high in protein. Pinto, black and kidney beans are easy to add to almost any meal, and provide 15 grams of protein per cup. Lentils come in many shapes and sizes, and at 18 grams of protein per cup, are worth trying. Azuki beans (17 grams of protein per cup) can be made into great-tasting soups or sweetened desserts. Seitan is another alternative made from wheat gluten, the protein found in wheat, so it is not suitable for those seeking a gluten-free diet. It is a chewy protein alternative delivering 18 grams of protein per 3-ounce serving. By including many of these foods in your daily diet, along with triathlete favorites like oatmeal (5 grams of protein per cooked cup), Greek yogurt (13–16 grams of protein per 5 ounces), cottage cheese (13–16 grams of protein per half-cup) and protein-rich vegetables (about 3 grams per half-cup each for peas, corn and potatoes), you have many options to ensure you meet your daily protein needs.

Lauren Antonucci, R.D., is a board-certified specialist in sports dietetics, three-time Ironman finisher and the founding director of Nutrition Energy in New York City.

RELATED: How To Transition To A Vegetarian Diet

More Nutrition Q&A.

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Photos: 2014 Ironman 70.3 Austin http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/photos/photos-2014-ironman-70-3-austin_108548 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/photos/photos-2014-ironman-70-3-austin_108548#comments Tue, 28 Oct 2014 17:30:22 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=108548

Recap Sunday's Ironman 70.3 Austin.

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Photos: Mario Cantu

Australia’s Christian Kemp and the United States’ Lesley Smith showed strong late-season form to earn the victories at Sunday’s Ironman 70.3 Austin.
Read the recap.

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Win Craig Alexander’s Kona Helmet! http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/news/win-craig-alexanders-kona-helmet_108727 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/news/win-craig-alexanders-kona-helmet_108727#comments Tue, 28 Oct 2014 15:56:11 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=108727

You could own the custom helmet that 3-time Ironman world champion Craig Alexander wore in Kona just a couple weeks ago.

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You could own the custom helmet that 3-time Ironman world champion Craig Alexander wore in Kona just a couple weeks ago, courtesy of Crowie, helmet sponsor Road ID and Triathlete magazine. MSRP is $1,000. Enter to win here.

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One-Hour Workout: Bike-Run Race Prep http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/training/one-hour-workout-bike-run-race-prep_108723 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/training/one-hour-workout-bike-run-race-prep_108723#comments Tue, 28 Oct 2014 11:30:54 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=108723

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Tune up for your next race with this set and get some speed into those legs!

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

Every Tuesday we’ll feature a different coach’s workout you can complete in 60 minutes (or less!).

This week’s swim workout comes from coach Mike Ricci, owner of D3 Multisport (D3multisport.com) based in Boulder, Colo. “This is a great workout to add some speed to your training as you are getting ready to race an Olympic or sprint-distance race, but maybe you are short on time,” Ricci says. “You hit a few key areas during this workout:
 Efficiency with the one-leg drills, VO2 max with the majority of the set, and then of course pacing as you learn to hold back as you know the set is only going to get tougher. Tune up for your next race with this set and get some speed into those legs!”

RELATED: Hour Of Power Triathlon Brick Workout

Warm-up
13 minutes total, as:
10 min easy
After 5 min, add in 4×30 sec each leg of one-leg drill
Then 4×30 sec all-out with 30 sec rest
Easy spin 1 min

Main Set
5x through:
30 sec on/off, 45 sec on/off, 1 min on/off = 4.5 min per set

After the last rep, get off the bike and run a 3 min warm-up, and then right into:

3x through:
2 min fast (at 10K pace), 1 min recovery, 1 min faster (at 5K pace), 1 min recovery, 30 sec fastest (at sub-5K pace), 1 min recovery.  = 6.5 min per set.

RELATED: Three Running Workouts For The Treadmill

Cool-down
Remaining time; take extra as needed!

More one-hour workouts.

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Race Radar: Florida’s TriRock Clearwater http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/features/race-radar-floridas-trirock-clearwater_108720 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/features/race-radar-floridas-trirock-clearwater_108720#comments Tue, 28 Oct 2014 02:20:16 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=108720

The 2013 TriRock Clearwater race. Photo: Eve Edelheit/TriRock

Registration for the Nov. 9 race is open through Wed., Nov. 5. (Register using the discount code "TRIATHLETE" to save $20!)

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The 2013 TriRock Clearwater race. Photo: Eve Edelheit/TriRock

Now in its third year, TriRock Clearwater is becoming a favorite among Floridians, thanks to its flat and fast course and fun finish-line festival on Pier 60. It’s a great way to cap off the triathlon season, with ideal weather conditions and a scenic venue. Race organizers are expecting 900 athletes to race this year across both the sprint and intermediate distances, and registration is open through Wed., Nov. 5. (Register using the discount code TRIATHLETE to save $20!)

The course starts from white-sand beaches and follows a single loop (for both distances) in the warm, calm waters of the Gulf of Mexico. The one-loop bike course is flat and fast along the coast as well as inland through some residential areas and over the causeway (the only real hill) back to Clearwater Beach. The run is flat, except for the causeway bridge, and finishes at Pier 60 Park. The finish-line festival features a beer garden, band, food and post-race massage. The course is also great for spectators—you can watch the swim from atop Pier 60, follow the athletes as they pass through transition then see them multiple times on the bike and run.

TriRock Clearwater is a must-race for locals because of its cool-weather timing, spectator-friendly course and beautiful white sands venue. Other perks include three-deep awards (beer mugs), participant tech tees and TYR drawstring bags, and the top 10 tri clubs based on number of registered participants have designated areas to relax in the finish line area pre- and post-race.

RELATED PHOTOS: 2013 TriRock Clearwater Triathlon

Details

What: TriRock Clearwater
Where: Clearwater, Fla.
When: Nov. 9, 2014
Distance: Intermediate/Olympic (1500-meter swim, 24.6-mile bike, 6-mile run) and sprint (500-meter swim, 12.2-mile bike, 3-mile run)
Website: Trirockseries.com

If you think your local triathlon should be featured on Triathlete.com, send an email to bmavis@competitorgroup.com with the name of the race, website, and why you think other triathletes should know about it.

Note: The TriRock Triathlon Series is owned by Competitor Group, Inc., the same company that owns Triathlete magazine.

More Race Radar.

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Photos: 2014 XTERRA World Championships http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/photos/photos-2014-xterra-world-championships-2_108669 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/10/photos/photos-2014-xterra-world-championships-2_108669#comments Mon, 27 Oct 2014 19:48:45 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=108669

Ruben Ruzafa and Flora Duffy continued their domination of the XTERRA circuit.

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Spain’s Ruben Ruzafa earned a significant lead on the bike and held on to defend the crown and earn his third XTERRA World Championship title. Bermuda’s Flora Duffy continued her domination of the 2014 season, grabbing her first XTERRA World Championship thanks to a well-rounded effort across swim, bike and run. Read the recap.

RELATED – Flora Duffy: It Was A Huge Day For Me

RELATED – Ruben Ruzafa Recaps His World Championship Day

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