Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com Triathlon Training, Gear, Nutrition, Photos, Race Results & Calendars Mon, 06 Jul 2015 21:54:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0.1 Reid, McQuaid On Top At Challenge St. Andrews http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/news/reid-mcquaid-on-top-at-challenge-st-andrews_118570 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/news/reid-mcquaid-on-top-at-challenge-st-andrews_118570#comments Mon, 06 Jul 2015 21:54:04 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=118570

Men's champion Taylor Reid.

Canada's Taylor Reid and Melanie McQuaid claimed the victories at Sunday's Challenge St. Andrews in British Columbia, Canada.

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Men's champion Taylor Reid.

Canada’s Taylor Reid and Melanie McQuaid claimed the victories at Sunday’s Challenge St. Andrews in British Columbia, Canada.

Read the recap from Challenge Family below:

Last year’s guest, Hurricane Arthur, did not return for this year’s Challenge St. Andrews weekend; instead, athletes were treated to warm Maritime temperatures and the beautiful scenery surrounding the resort community of St. Andrews-by-the-Sea. Spectators got the chance to see Rob Velhelst (Fireman Rob) race towards his Guinness World Record as he completed his 14th Half distance race this year. Amazingly, he does all of this while wearing full fire fighter gear on the run.

In the professional race, this year’s event saw a larger field than in 2014 with 18 elite athletes competing. The first athlete out of the water in the elite field was Italian Alberto Alessandroni, followed by John Kenny. After exiting Katy’s Cove onto the bike, Alessandroni rocketed down the bike course on his way to a 2:12 bike split. As the pro men came back into St. Andrews, Reid quickly took over the lead and screamed out onto the run course. Reid looked comfortable and under control as he went on to a 1:13 run to claim the men’s title with an overall time of 3:54:14.

In the women’s race, McQuaid took the lead from the start with a fast 23:23 swim, followed by Kristen Marchant, Isabelle Rouleau and Jillian Peterson. McQuaid, a multi-time world champion and five-time Ironman 70.3 champion continued to dominate the day as she entered the run course. Reid’s teammate, Kristen Marchant, took off after McQuaid on the run and was able to take some time back, but it was not enough and McQuaid went on to take the women’s title with a 4:26:57 clocking.

Challenge St. Andrews
St. Andrews, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada – July 5, 2015
1.2-mile swim, 56-mile bike, 13.1-mile run

Men
1. Taylor Reid (CAN) 3:54:14
2. Alberto Alessandroni (ITA) 4:03:46
3. Iain Alexandridis (USA) 4:06:50
4. Alistair Eeckman (USA) 4:09:20
5. John Kenny (USA) 4:10:11

Women
1. Melanie McQuaid (CAN) 4:26:57
2. Kristen Marchant (CAN) 4:29:21
3. Jillian Petersen (USA) 4:29:43
4. Isabelle Rouleau (CAN) 4:44:00 * F20-24
5. Charisa Wernick (USA) 4:44:16

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Photos: More From Frankfurt http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/photos/photos-more-from-frankfurt_118521 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/photos/photos-more-from-frankfurt_118521#comments Mon, 06 Jul 2015 20:58:41 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=118521

Photographer Paul Phillips shares some select images from the 2015 Ironman European Championships in Frankfurt, Germany.

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Photos: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image/@Compimagephoto

Photographer Paul Phillips shares some select images from the 2015 Ironman European Championships in Frankfurt, Germany.

See our first gallery here
.

Read the race recap here.

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Jamie Whitmore Shares Her Life Lessons http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/news/jamie-whitmore-shares-her-life-lessons_118517 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/news/jamie-whitmore-shares-her-life-lessons_118517#comments Mon, 06 Jul 2015 20:23:04 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=118517

Jamie Whitmore at the 2011 XTERRA U.S. Championships. Photo: XTERRA

Two-time XTERRA world champion Jamie Whitmore shares her life lessons and future sporting plans with Glamour magazine.

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Jamie Whitmore at the 2011 XTERRA U.S. Championships. Photo: XTERRA

Two-time XTERRA world champion Jamie Whitmore shares her life lessons and future sporting plans with Glamour magazine.

By the age of 31, Jamie Whitmore was the most decorated off-road triathlete of all time. That all changed within months when Jamie was stricken with cancer and told she would never be able to race again.

While Whitmore was a talented athlete, competing in triathlons, racing mountain bikes, and becoming the most successful female athlete in XTERRA triathlon history with 37 wins, six national titles, and one world title—nothing compared with the battle that is cancer. There were surgeries (the removal of her left gluteus), radiation, chemotherapy, infections (including damage to the sciatic nerve), and paralysis of muscles near her ankle that left Whitmore fighting for her life.

And yet, she survived. She not only survived but thrived, accepting her new reality as not enough reason to prevent her from going after her dreams. She went on to have twin boys, and returned to competition as a challenged athlete. She won her first Paralympic national title and, since then, has become one of the top female cyclists in the world. But how? How does one fight through such despair and pain when it looks as if the world is crumbling around you? On this holiday weekend, we asked Jamie to share with us the advice and wisdom that no doubt got her through the darkest days so she could enjoy the most promising future.

Jamie’s Life Lessons:

– Trust your judgment and what your body may be trying to tell you. We athletes know our bodies the best. If something isn’t feeling right, don’t disregard it. Take care of it ahead of time because you could face worse consequences in the long run.

– When my doctor told me I would never be able to run or ride a mountain bike again, rather than becoming discouraged I felt inspired to prove him wrong. I encourage other disabled or challenged athletes out there to do the same and take any negative thoughts or feedback and turn them into things that motivate you to prove others wrong.

Read more: Glamour.com

RELATED – Jamie Whitmore: Back In The Saddle

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New Company Launches Insole-Based Power Meter System http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/gear-tech/new-company-launches-insole-based-power-meter-system_118514 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/gear-tech/new-company-launches-insole-based-power-meter-system_118514#comments Mon, 06 Jul 2015 20:05:54 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=118514

Photo: John David Becker

The RMP² insoles could lead to a new generation of versatile power meters.

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Photo: John David Becker

The RMP² insoles could lead to a new generation of versatile power meters.

The advancement and development of power meters may be the fastest growing gear segment in the multisport industry, and a new company called RPM² (Remote Performance Measurement and Monitoring) is aiming to revolutionize the category with an insole-based system that has sensors embedded in the inserts to monitor the distribution of pressure on the sole of each foot.

Concept

When used in cycling mode, the insoles provide power data for each leg and can even identify if your foot is pronating or supinating through your pedal stroke. There are several advantages to an insole-based power system (over a hub- or crank-based power meter), such as the ability to easily swap the inserts between shoes. The price—ranging from $700 to $750—also makes it one of the cheapest power-measuring products available.

RPM² also has run functionality, which measures ground contact time, flight time, cadence and sequential force strike, which shows where you land on your foot as well as how much you pronate. The insoles measure bilateral range of motion to analyze ankle dorsiflexion, knee extension and hip flexion and extension. The system works through an app on your phone and has the goal of improving efficiency by revealing imbalances.

RELATED: How To Use A Power Meter In A Race?

Execution

Weighing about as much as a racing flat, these insoles should be considered a training tool and probably not something you’d use on race day. Another drawback is the lack of ANT+ connectivity, so you can currently only pair it with your phone. Battery life is about five hours and it takes 45 minutes to recharge each insole using an included charging mat.

Our wish list of refinements: a sleeker design and ANT+ connectivity (which RPM² is close to launching). Even without those additions, RPM² has developed a unique tool that could lead to a new generation of versatile power meters to help athletes further optimize their training.

RPM2 Insoles ($700–$750)
Rpm2.com

RELATED: 6 Power Meters Reviewed

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Everything An Athlete Needs To Know About Protein http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/nutrition/everything-an-athlete-needs-to-know-about-protein_118509 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/nutrition/everything-an-athlete-needs-to-know-about-protein_118509#comments Mon, 06 Jul 2015 17:09:58 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=118509

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Your questions about this essential macronutrient, answered by Lauren Antonucci, R.D.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

Your questions about this essential macronutrient, answered by Lauren Antonucci, R.D.

I have received several reader questions regarding protein—optimal daily intake, best sources, timing, etc.—so I’m taking this chance to tell you everything an athlete needs to know about protein.

First the basics: Proteins are nitrogen-containing foods that contain different combinations of 20 amino acids. Eight of those amino acids are considered essential, meaning that our bodies cannot make them and we therefore need to consume them in foods on a regular basis. Protein intake is critical for muscle repair and synthesis as well as production of hormones, enzymes and hemoglobin, and contributes greatly to satiety (feeling of fullness) and immune function.

A triathlete’s daily protein needs are higher than the USDA’s recommendation of 0.8 grams per kilogram per day. Most of us likely need 1.2–1.6 grams of protein per kilogram per day. This equals 65–83 grams for a 120-pound triathlete and 87–116 grams for a 160-pound triathlete. Inadequate total protein intake could lead to muscle breakdown, poor recovery, increased injury rate and compromised immune function.

Pre-workout intake of protein can help spare muscle glycogen during exercise. Aim for 8–20 grams of protein 1–2 hours before training sessions along with your usual carbohydrate fuel.

During endurance exercise lasting more than two hours, studies support the intake of protein (along with carbohydrate) to help preserve muscle. During endurance exercise, your energy expenditure can be made of 1–6 percent protein, and up to 10–15 percent in some instances. Taking in adequate carbohydrate along with 6–8 grams of whey protein per hour will maximize protein sparing and muscle breakdown.

Post-training, you should aim for 15–20 grams of protein to help support muscle repair and synthesis, and support immune function. Aim to consume this within the first 30-minute “recovery window,” and also include carbs to help replenish glycogen (the carbs also cause insulin to be secreted, which helps your body uptake the needed amino acids from your protein).

How much is too much? The absorption rate of protein from the GI tract varies with type of protein eaten but reaches a max of 8–10 grams per hour. Also, excessive protein intake that exceeds the liver’s ability to convert excess nitrogen to urea stresses the body and can lead to increases in ammonia and insulin, as well as nausea, diarrhea and calcium loss, and increases overall fluid needs. Finally, when protein intake exceeds need, it is likely that other nutritious foods—and therefore critical nutrients, vitamins and minerals—are being “crowded out” and deficiencies may result.

So as with most things, adequate protein intake is critical to overall health, weight control and athletic performance, but more is not always better. If you are unsure whether your current protein intake is meeting your needs, find a certified sports dietitian to ensure your attention to nutrition and training efforts pays off!

RELATED: 4 Protein-Rich Snacks

Common Protein Sources

Eggs
6–7 grams each

Greek Yogurt
13–16 grams per 5 ounces

Red Meat
20–25 grams per 3 ounces

Tofu
6 grams per 3 ounces

Low-Fat Milk
8 grams per cup

Cooked Beans
8–9 grams per half cup

RELATED: Tasty Meatless Protein Options

Lauren Antonucci is a board-certified specialist in sports dietetics, three-time Ironman finisher and the founding director of Nutrition Energy in New York City.

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Pyramid Scheme: A Track Workout For New Speed http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/training/pyramid-scheme-a-track-workout-for-new-speed_118506 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/training/pyramid-scheme-a-track-workout-for-new-speed_118506#comments Mon, 06 Jul 2015 16:54:18 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=118506

Photo: shuterstock.com

Breaking up a track session into a pyramid format not only keeps things interesting, it forces you to examine your pacing.

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Photo: shuterstock.com

Planning for an “A” race later this fall? Try this simple early- to mid-season track workout for new speed.

Breaking up a track session into a pyramid format not only keeps things interesting, it forces you to examine your pacing, since the way back “down” the set mirrors the way you went up. This track session from Jonathan Cane of New York City’s City Coach Multisport is one he does often during the start of race season. “In the early season I like to avoid too much ‘changing gears,’ and therefore create increased stress via distance rather than speed,” Cane says. “Later in the season I might manipulate speed rather than distance in order to increase the challenge, but in the spring or early summer, that’s probably a little aggressive for most distance folks.”

RELATED: Interval Workouts To Try On The Track

The Workout

After a thorough warm-up (at least 10–15 minutes), do this main set on the track:

  • 2×400 at 5K pace with 200 recovery jog
  • 1×800 at 5K pace with 400 recovery jog
  • 1×1600 at 5K pace with 800 recovery jog
  • 1×800 at 5K pace with 400 recovery jog
  • 2×400 at 5K pace with 200 recovery jog

Follow it with a thorough cool-down.

RELATED: How To Get Back To Speedwork

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Video: An Exercise To Prevent Achilles Tendon Strains http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/training/monday-minute-eccentric-calf-raise_10103 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/training/monday-minute-eccentric-calf-raise_10103#comments Mon, 06 Jul 2015 16:50:24 +0000 http://video.competitor.com/2010/06/running/monday-minute/monday-minute-eccentric-calf-raise/

Tim Crowley and friends demonstrate an effective move for the prevention of calf muscle and Achilles tendon strains.

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Tim Crowley and friends demonstrate an effective move for the prevention of calf muscle and Achilles tendon strains.

More “Monday Minute” exercises.

RELATED: Treatment And Prevention Of Achilles Injuries

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Photos: 2015 Ironman European Championships – Frankfurt http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/photos/photos-2015-ironman-european-championships-frankfurt_118443 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/photos/photos-2015-ironman-european-championships-frankfurt_118443#comments Mon, 06 Jul 2015 00:31:32 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=118443

Germany's Jan Frodeno and Switzerland's Daniela Ryf turned in blazing performance's in hot conditions at Sunday's Ironman European

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Photos: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image/@Compimagephoto

Germany’s Jan Frodeno and Switzerland’s Daniela Ryf, both members of the newly-formed Bahrain Endurance 13 team, turned in blazing performance’s in hot conditions at Sunday’s Ironman European Championships to establish new course records on the way to earning the key victories. Read the race recap.

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Frodeno, Ryf Get Course Records In Hot Conditions In Frankfurt http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/news/frodeno-ryf-get-course-records-in-hot-conditions-in-frankfurt_118437 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/news/frodeno-ryf-get-course-records-in-hot-conditions-in-frankfurt_118437#comments Sun, 05 Jul 2015 15:19:15 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=118437

Ryf, who is also a member of Bahrain Endurance 13 team, was stellar in her fourth attempt at Ironman. Photo: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image

Jan Frodeno and Daniela Ryf were impressive against top competition on a tough day of racing in Frankfurt, Germany.

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Ryf, who is also a member of Bahrain Endurance 13 team, was stellar in her fourth attempt at Ironman. Photo: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image

Germany’s Jan Frodeno and Switzerland’s Daniela Ryf earned the Ironman European Championship titles today in Frankfurt, Germany by outlasting hot conditions and an extremely competitive professional field. Despite the 100 degrees F heat, Frodeno and Ryfwho are both members of the newly-formed Bahrain Endurance 13 teampowered through the swim, bike and run to establish impressive new course records. Frodeno and Ryf finished on the Kona podium last year and, with these wins, will both be considered top contenders as they each pursue their first Ironman world titles this October. In addition to the automatic Kona spots handed out to each winner, professionals were also competing for their share of $150,000 and coveted KPR points.

RELATED PHOTOS: 2015 Ironman European Championship

Men’s Race
It was the 2.4-mile swim that set the tone for a strong day for Frodeno. The 2008 Olympic gold medalist exited the water in 46:02, with only fellow German Andi Boecherer (46:56) exiting within a minute of the eventual race winner. 2013 Ironman world champion Frederik Van Lierde (2 minutes back) and 2014 Ironman world champion Sebastian Kienle (4 minutes back) started the bike with some work to do.

Frodeno rode strong out front and it initially looked like Kienlewho is known for his cycling abilitieswould catch him before the end of the 112-mile ride. At the 60K mark, the gap from Frodeno to Kienle had shrunk down to 1:16. From about that point in the race, it went the other way as Frodeno pushed the pace on his way to a blistering course record 4:08:43 bike split. By the time bike turned to run, Frodeno’s lead was a solid 6 minutes over Kienle and Boecherer, and 11 over Van Lierde, Eneko Llanos (ESP), Tyler Butterfield (ESP) and Bas Diederen (NED).

Frodeno capped off his wire-to-wire win with a 2:50:49 marathon, putting him across the finish line in 7:49:48 and besting Kienle’s 2014 course record of 7:55:14 by more than 5 minutes. Kienle was solid in second, posting a 2:56:44 marathon to cross the line in 8:01:39. Boecherer rounded out the championship podium in 8:03:49. Diederen ran his way to fourth at 8:05:36, with Van Lierde claiming fifth in 8:07:09.

RELATED – PROfile: Jan Frodeno

Women’s Race
Switzerland’s Caroline Steffen established a slim early lead, exiting the water in 52:42, with Denmark’s Michelle Vesterby (52:45), Ryf (52:46) and Germany’s Julia Gajer (52:47) all following close behind. Steffen started the ride out front, but was quickly forced to the side of the road to deal with a mechanical on the bike. Ryf also lost some time very early, as she stumbled while trying to mount her bike out of T1.

Vesterby inherited the lead, with Gajer chasing close behind. Once Steffen and Ryf got settled from their mishaps, they were able to bridge the gap up to the leaders. As Vesterby fell off of the pace, Gajer, Ryf and Steffen rode neck and neck through much of the first half of the bike. With about 40 miles left in the ride, Ryf decided to make a move. The three-women race quickly became all about Ryf as she used a 4:47:50 bike split to power her way to a sizable lead to start the run. Gajer was next into T2 (7:38 back), with Steffen (10 minutes back) and Vesterby (14 minutes back) following. Ryf maintained her lead throughout the marathon, posting a 3:06:06 marathon to best Chrissie Wellington’s 2008 course record (8:51:24) and take the win in 8:51:00. Gajer was impressive in front of her home crowd, crossing the finish line second in 9:01:58. Steffen rounded out the top three in 9:11:55. Germany’s Sonja Tajsich was fourth, with American Ruth Brennan-Morrey posting a fast 3:04:59 marathon to run her way to fifth.

RELATED – PROfile: Daniela Ryf

Ironman European Championships
Frankfurt, Germany – July 5, 2015
2.4-mile swim, 112-mile bike, 26.2-mile run

Men
1. Jan Frodeno (GER) 7:49:48
2. Sebastian Kienle (GER) 8:01:39
3. Andi Boecherer (GER) 8:03:49
4. Bas Diederen (NED) 8:05:36
5. Frederik Van Lierde (BEL) 8:07:09

Women
1. Daniela Ryf (SUI) 8:51:00
2. Julia Gajer (GER) 9:01:58
3. Caroline Steffen (SUI) 9:11:55
4. Sonja Tajsich (GER) 9:19:29
5. Ruth Brennan-Morrey (USA) 9:21:09

Complete results.

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Photos: Pre-Race From The Ironman European Championships http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/photos/photos-pre-race-from-the-ironman-european-championships_118412 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/photos/photos-pre-race-from-the-ironman-european-championships_118412#comments Sat, 04 Jul 2015 15:39:18 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=118412

Some of the biggest names in the sport have traveled to the Ironman European Championships in Frankfurt, Germany.

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Photos: Paul Phillips/Competitive/@Compimagephoto

Some of the biggest names in the sport have traveled to the Ironman European Championships in Frankfurt, Germany to compete for automatic Kona qualifying spots, coveted KPR points and a share of the $150,000 prize purse. The race will feature by far the most competitive lineup of any Ironman to this point in the season and includes defending Ironman world champion Sebastian Kienle, 2013 Ironman world champion Frederik Van Lierde, defending Ironman 70.3 world champion Daniela Ryf, 2008 Olympic gold medalist Jan Frodeno, two-time ITU long distance world champion Caroline Steffen and more. With race day temperatures expected to reach 101 degrees F, pros did their best to stay cool in the days leading up. See the complete lineup here. Check back Sunday for a race recap and photo gallery.

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Four Workout Options For July 4 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/training/four-workout-options-for-july-4_118409 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/training/four-workout-options-for-july-4_118409#comments Thu, 02 Jul 2015 19:57:13 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=118409

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Enjoy the holiday weekend with one (or hey, why not all?) of these one-hour workouts.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

Enjoy the holiday weekend with one (or hey, why not all?) of these one-hour workouts.

Swim

This broken endurance set keeps the mind engaged with a different focus for each interval.
Get the workout.

Bike

This workout is designed to give a longer interval near race pace with an aggressive surge in the middle and an end like you may experience during a race.
Get the workout.

Run

This workout targets a sprint- or Olympic-distance athlete looking to add a bit more speed to his or her fitness.
Get the workout.

Strength

This cross-training workout mixes strength, yoga and stretching in one session.
Get the workout.

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Recipe Of The Week: Shrimp Tacos http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/nutrition/recipe-of-the-week-shrimp-tacos_118404 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/nutrition/recipe-of-the-week-shrimp-tacos_118404#comments Thu, 02 Jul 2015 17:48:04 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=118404

A must-add to your summer menu, these shrimp tacos are surprisingly easy to make.

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Robust cumin crusted shrimp pair well with a creamy avocado mash, salty queso fresco and bright jicama slaw. A must-add to your summer menu, these shrimp tacos are surprisingly easy to make.

Ingredients

Makes 8 tacos
24 medium-size shrimp (16-20 count per pound), deveined tail-off
2 TBSP cumin
1 TBSP chili powder
1 TBSP olive oil
½ tsp sea salt
¼ fresh cracked pepper
8 thick corn tortillas
1 cup green cabbage, thinly cut
1 cup jicama, cut into thin matchsticks
¼ cup freshly chopped cilantro
Juice and zest of one lime
2 tsp agave
1 large avocado
2 TBSP non-fat plain yogurt
½ cup crumbled queso fresco
extra limes for serving

RELATED RECIPE: Papaya, Cucumber And Peanut Shrimp Salad

Preparation

1. Heat oven to high broil. Prepare a baking sheet with foil and non-stick cooking spray. Position oven rack on the second to top shelf.
2. Pat shrimp dry with paper towel. In a small bowl, toss the shrimp with the cumin, chili powder, olive oil, salt and pepper until well coated.
3. Broil for about 2 min per side, until spices are golden and the shrimp are just cooked through. Do not overcook.
4. To cook tortillas, place directly onto the burners of a gas stove over the flame (medium heat). Watch closely and let char just slightly on either side. If working with an electric stove, place tortillas in oven under the broiler for 30-60 seconds per side, until they start to crisp just slightly.
5. Combine the cabbage, jicama, cilantro, lime and agave in a bowl.
6. In a separate bowl, mash together the avocado and yogurt with a small amount of salt and pepper.
7. To assemble the tacos, spread a small amount of the avocado mash on the tortillas. Place 3 shrimp on each tortilla over the mash. Sprinkle each with 1 TBSP queso fresco, and evenly divide the slaw over the top (about ¼ cup each).
8. Serve with lime slices.

More recipes from Jessica Cerra.

Jessica Cerra is the owner of Fit Food by Jess, a private chef and catering company in Encinitas, Calif., and the co-founder of Harmony Bar. A former professional XTERRA triathlete, Cerra now races for Twenty16 Women’s Professional Cycling Team.

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Two New Polarized Goggles http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/gear-tech/two-new-polarized-goggles_118399 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/gear-tech/two-new-polarized-goggles_118399#comments Thu, 02 Jul 2015 17:31:23 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=118399

Photo: John David Becker

Both Aqua Sphere and Blueseventy have added polarized lens options to their most popular open water frames.

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Photo: John David Becker


Two new polarized goggles take the glare out of your open-water swims.

During races with varying light conditions—for instance, going straight into the sun one direction and not on the way back, or racing with a moving cloud cover—polarized lenses can reduce glare and keep your line of vision to the buoys clear. Both Aqua Sphere and Blueseventy have added polarized lens options to their most popular open water frames.

Blueseventy Hydra-Vision

$35, Blueseventy.com

Available in a bronze or smoke-colored polarized lens, the curved, wide lenses of the comfortable and light Hydra-Vision make sighting a cinch. Blueseventy also offers a $30 mirrored version and $25 non-mirrored clear or yellow option.

RELATED – 2015 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide: Goggles

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2016 U.S. Olympic Triathlon Spots Up For Grabs In One Month http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/news/first-2016-u-s-olympic-triathlon-spots-up-for-grabs-in-one-month_118397 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/news/first-2016-u-s-olympic-triathlon-spots-up-for-grabs-in-one-month_118397#comments Thu, 02 Jul 2015 16:51:31 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=118397

Katie Zaferes, Gwen Jorgensen and Sarah True are all slated to compete in the Olympic text event in one month. Photo: Janos Schmidt/Triathlon.org

The 2015 Rio de Janeiro ITU World Olympic Qualification Event is set for Aug. 2, and at least 12 Americans are expected to toe the line.

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Katie Zaferes, Gwen Jorgensen and Sarah True are all slated to compete in the Olympic text event in one month. Photo: Janos Schmidt/Triathlon.org

USA Triathlon released the following easy-to-follow guide about U.S. qualification for the 2016 Rio Olympics.

The 2015 Rio de Janeiro ITU World Olympic Qualification Event is set for Aug. 2, and at least 12 Americans are expected to toe the line in search of individual and team spots in the first qualification opportunity for the 2016 U.S. Olympic Triathlon Team.

The World Olympic Qualification Event, which serves as the Olympic test event for next year’s competition, will be centered at Copacabana Beach and Avenida Atlantica. The elite women are set to race at 8 a.m. ET (9 a.m. local time) on Aug. 2, with the elite men to follow at 11:15 a.m. ET (12:15 p.m. local time). The top-three finishers in each race will earn a spot that helps their respective National Federations earn country spots to field a team for the 2016 Olympic Games triathlon, set for Aug. 18 and 20, 2016.

For U.S. athletes, the event also has individual qualification implications.

Qualifying for the U.S. Olympic Triathlon Team

The Rio World Olympic Qualification Event is the first individual qualifier for Americans vying for a spot on the 2016 U.S. Olympic Triathlon Team. The top two U.S. finishers in the top eight overall automatically earn a spot on the team.

Only two spots are available for qualification at the Olympic test eventif three U.S. athletes finish in the top eight, only the top two will qualify. If two athletes qualify in Rio, the third spot will be available at a yet-to-be-determined event held between March and May 2016; no additional qualifying opportunities will take place in 2015. If one or no athletes qualify in Rio, one spot will be available at the ITU World Triathlon Grand Final Chicago, held in the city’s Grant Park on Sept. 18-19, provided the athlete finishes in the top eight overall.

Breakdown of available spots for the U.S. Olympic Triathlon Team

Aug. 2 – 2015 Rio de Janeiro ITU World Olympic Qualification Event
Two spots available; top-eight finish required

Sept. 18-19 – 2015 ITU World Triathlon Grand Final Chicago (World Championships)
One spot available (only if two spots are not filled at the Aug. 2 event); top-eight finish required

Spring 2016 (March-May) – Yet-to-be-determined U.S. qualification event
One spot available; finish requirement dependent on event level
WTS event: top-three finish required
World Cup event: top-three finish required if Quality of Field* is 16 percent or better; victory required if QoF is less than 16 percent
Continental Cup: victory required
*Quality of field is defined by ITU: every athlete ranked in the top 20 of the current ITU Points list who starts the race will increase the value of the race by 2 percent up to a maximum of 20 percent per event.

If spots still remain open after these three qualification events:
One spot may be allocated as a domestique selection
Any remaining spots will be allocated through a USA Triathlon Objective Rankings System, based on performances at five international events

Outlook for the 2016 U.S. Olympic Triathlon Team

Since triathlon has been held in the Olympic Games, beginning with the Sydney 2000 debut, the field has been comprised of 55 men and 55 women. Only eight nations are able to qualify a maximum of three athletes per gender; all other nations will field teams with two or fewer athletes per gender. In 2000, 2004 and 2008, the U.S. qualified for the maximum team size – three men, three women. In 2012, the U.S. Olympic Triathlon Team had three women and two men.

Heading into the 2016 Olympic Games, the U.S. is in a better position to qualify three athletes per gender in comparison to the last Olympiad. Based on the Rio 2016 Olympic Qualification List rankings alone (as of July 1), the U.S. would be the first nation to qualify three women and the fifth nation to qualify three men. The rankings are one way for Americans to secure the three team spots for the United States; the U.S. may also solidify team spots with a win at the Pan American Games on July 11-12 or podium finishes at the Rio World Olympic Qualification Event on Aug. 2. Four additional continental qualifiers (Africa, Asia, Europe and Oceania) also play a role in determining team size for other National Federations in those respective regions.

Forty nations are expected to have representation during the 2016 Olympic Games triathlon, but only three nationsUnited States, Great Britain, Australiaare projected to have full six-person teams based on ITU’s current Olympic Simulation. More on the current rankings, the Olympic Qualification List and the Olympic Simulation can be found at triathlon.org/rankings.

With six events completed on the 2015 ITU World Triathlon Series (WTS) circuit, the U.S. women are leading the way for Olympic qualification and world championship titles. An American woman has finished on the podium in all six WTS races, including two U.S. podium sweeps from the women at series stops in Gold Coast and London. The U.S. women have won 12 of 18 available medals in the first six races, owning two-thirds of the overall WTS medal haul so far this season, and have also earned a medal in three of the four World Cup races held so far in 2015.

Who from the U.S. will compete in the Olympic test event?

For U.S. athletes to earn a place on the start list for the World Olympic Qualification Event or World Triathlon Grand Final Chicago, USA Triathlon uses an objective system of measurement that accounts for top performances in Olympic-distance competition and athletes’ ITU Points List scores. Based on this system, the following U.S. elite women are expected to compete in Rio on Aug. 2:

Gwen Jorgensen: five wins in five WTS starts (Abu Dhabi, Auckland, Gold Coast, Yokohama, London); 10 consecutive WTS wins dating back to May 2014; 2014 ITU World Champion, 2012 Olympian
Katie Zaferes: five medals in five WTS starts (silver in Abu Dhabi, Auckland, Cape Town, London; bronze in Gold Coast)
Sarah True: silver medal at WTS Gold Coast, bronze at WTS London; top-nine WTS finishes in Abu Dhabi and Auckland; 2012 Olympian
Lindsey Jerdonek: two top-eight WTS finishes in Abu Dhabi and Gold Coast
Renée Tomlin: fourth at WTS Yokohama, winner of Chengdu ITU World Cup
Kirsten Kasper: sixth at WTS Cape Town, third at Huatulco ITU World Cup

The U.S. elite men will earn starts based on their position on the ITU points list, with the following six athletes expected to race in Rio on Aug. 2:

Jarrod Shoemaker: 12th at WTS Cape Town, 2008 Olympian
Joe Maloy: 10th at New Plymouth ITU World Cup, 20th at WTS Auckland
Kevin McDowell: third at Chengdu ITU World Cup, fourth at Huatulco ITU World Cup, 16th at WTS Cape Town; 2010 Youth Olympic Games silver medalist
Ben Kanute: ninth at WTS Auckland
Greg Billington: seventh at Chengdu ITU World Cup, 17th at WTS Yokohama
Hunter Kemper: fourth at Chengdu ITU World Cup, third at Monterrey CAMTRI Championships; four-time Olympian

RELATED – 2016 Olympics Update: Where The U.S. Stands

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The Positives Of A Negative Bike Split http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/training/the-positives-of-a-negative-bike-split_58654 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/training/the-positives-of-a-negative-bike-split_58654#comments Thu, 02 Jul 2015 16:05:47 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=58654

Photo: Tami Freed / Shutterstock.com

Applying more effort to the second half of the bike in a race is a powerful strategy for three important reasons.

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Photo: Tami Freed / Shutterstock.com

To negative split is to go faster in the second half of a race leg than in the first. In reality, however, due to the layout of courses, winds and other factors, it’s more accurate to negative split your effort, applying more effort to the second half of the bike. This is a powerful strategy for three important reasons.

1. Start slow so you don’t blow.

Nearly everyone experiences a significant disconnect between heart rate, effort and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) in the first 20–60 minutes of the bike leg. That is, it may feel easy, like you’re not working hard at all, but your heart rate and effort applied to the bike are telling you something quite different. It can take several minutes for heart rate and RPE to reflect your effort level. By committing to backing off in the first third or half of the bike leg, you avoid the common mistake of working too hard without realizing it.

RELATED: How To Pace Your Race

2. Stockpile your energy for changing conditions.

Triathlon bike courses seldom get easier. Wind and heat pick up, mental and physical fatigue set in. By going easy when it’s easy, you create a mental and physical reserve to co

RELATED: Power Boost Your Brick Runs With Plyos

3. Gain confidence and finish strong.

These guidelines set you up for success on the run. Understand that 80 percent of the field will not be racing this way: They will ignore the early disconnect between actual effort and perceived effort, working much too hard without realizing it, and not saving energy for increasingly difficult conditions. So gain confidence knowing you’ve executed the bike correctly and have set up a great run!

This advice to negative split your bike leg becomes more urgent as the length of your race increases—a long race creates more opportunities to make mistakes, and those mistakes have more time to express themselves on the run. Think you’ve ridden the first third of the Ironman bike too easy? You now have 26 miles to fix that. But if you rode too hard, that mistake now has 26 miles to express itself. How good will that bike split look when you’re walking 10 miles in the dark?

RELATED: 3 Keys To Unlock A Run PR

Rich Strauss is the co-owner of Endurance Nation, a coaching outfit that has trained more than 5,000 athletes since 2007 (Endurancenation.us).

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Lionel Sanders On Overcoming Drug Addiction http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/news/lionel-sanders-on-overcoming-drug-addiction_118391 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/news/lionel-sanders-on-overcoming-drug-addiction_118391#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 23:39:11 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=118391

Sanders competing at Ironman 70.3 California in Oceanside. Photo: John David Becker

From substance abuser to successful pro, Lionel Sanders chats about his extraordinary path to becoming a triathlon champion.

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Sanders competing at Ironman 70.3 California in Oceanside. Photo: John David Becker

From substance abuser to successful professional triathlete, Lionel Sanders chats with USA Today about his extraordinary path to becoming a triathlon champion.

A mile into the marathon, Lionel Sanders was in the hurt box. That’s what Erin MacDonald, his fiancee, called it as she watched from their home in Canada. She could see that no matter how Sanders finished this Ironman, his body was going to pay.

For his two years as a pro triathlete, Sanders had excelled at subjecting his body to pain. He even calls the room where he trains the pain cave.

By the time he’d started the 26.2-mile run in the North American Ironman Championships in May, Sanders had overcome a more than 9-minute deficit from the 2.4-mile swim and briefly taken the lead during the 112-mile bike leg. In the 86-degree heat, it came at a cost.

“I had never seen him look that bad that early in a run,” says MacDonald.

In second place going into the final leg, Sanders struggled as he finished fourth. It was the most he’d suffered in a race, he said afterward, and the hardest he’d pushed himself since his first Ironman as an amateur five years ago.

By breakfast the next day, he was grateful. With six wins in Ironman and 70.3 races under his belt, Sanders had come to Texas to stand atop the podium.

Perhaps reflective of the journey he’s been on for the past five years — one that’s seen him emerge from drug addiction to being one of the most promising young triathletes in the world — Sanders was not disappointed.

“(That race) was a very joyful experience, though it might not have shown on my face and in my words,” says Sanders, 27. “But behind it all, I love that stuff. I love it.”

He heads into this weekend’s 70.3 race in Muskoka, Ontario, with eyes ahead to the Ironman World Championships in Kona in October. For a guy who signed up for his first Ironman in 2010 on a lark as he struggled to overcome addiction, the chance to compete in that race (and with a good chance to contend for a podium spot) is remarkable reminder to his path here.

Read more: Usatoday.com

RELATED: Lionel Sanders’ Path To 70.3 Champion

 

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Why You’re Cramping On The Run http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/nutrition/dealing-cramping-run_103210 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/nutrition/dealing-cramping-run_103210#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 21:25:11 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=103210

Photo: Shutterstock.com

In a long-course race, I felt super tired and my muscles cramped up two-thirds of the way into the run, despite drinking tons of fluid.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

Q: In a recent long-course race, I felt super tired and my muscles cramped up two-thirds of the way into the run, despite drinking tons of fluid. Where did I go wrong?

A: I’m pretty sure you failed to take in enough sodium during your long-course race. Although I’m sure you’ve heard of the dangers of both under-hydrating and hyponatremia (over-hydrating, or diluting your electrolytes), the entire topic of hydrating can be very confusing to even the smartest of triathletes. You can still become dehydrated despite adequate fluid intake if you’re not keeping your sodium balance in check. It is likely that you took in too little sodium, and I recommend you increase your intake of sodium before and during your next long training or race. Increase your sports drink consumption to at least 50–75 percent of your total fluid intake during your training and race. Use an endurance sports drink (with 200 milligrams of sodium per 8 ounces versus the usual 110). I would also recommend you conduct a few sweat tests to more accurately determine your sweat rate and help ensure you are drinking the correct amount. Finally, add electrolyte tabs as needed until you are drinking enough fluid to nearly match your sweat rate. The combination of adequate total fluid and much-needed sodium will help propel you to a strong and safe finish in your next race.

RELATED: Get Serious About Sodium

More Nutrition Q&As.

Lauren Antonucci, R.D., is a board-certified specialist in sports dietetics, three-time Ironman finisher and the founding director of Nutrition Energy in New York City.

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Photos: 2015 ITU Long Distance World Championships http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/photos/photos-2015-itu-long-distance-world-championships_118324 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/photos/photos-2015-itu-long-distance-world-championships_118324#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 21:19:14 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=118324

Professionals, amateurs and paratriathletes descended on the Swedish town of Motala to compete for world titles.

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Photos: Janos Schmidt/Triathlon.org

Professionals, amateurs and paratriathletes descended on the Swedish town of Motala to compete over a two-lap 4km swim in the bay, followed by a picturesque three-lap hilly 120km bike and finally a three-lap 30km run that traversed the stunning shoreline of Lake Vattern. Ultimately it was the United States’ Mary Beth Ellis and France’s Cyril Viennot who claimed the first world titles of their careers at the ITU Long Distance World Championships. Read the race recap.

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Top Names To Tackle Ironman European Championships http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/news/top-names-to-tackle-ironman-european-championships_118322 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/news/top-names-to-tackle-ironman-european-championships_118322#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 20:59:29 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=118322

Kienle celebrated a course record on his 30th birthday last year. Photo: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image

Unquestionably the best professional Ironman race outside of the Ironman World Championship this season will take place this Sunday.

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Kienle celebrated a course record on his 30th birthday last year. Photo: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image

Unquestionably the best professional Ironman race outside of the Ironman World Championship this season will take place this Sunday, July 5, in Frankfurt, Germany. The bragging rights for the two athletes crowned Ironman European champs will be huge, but there are also important season implicationsguaranteed Kona spots, KPR points and prize moneyfor several pros on the start list.

There are no less than a handful of male athletes who could claim the win on Sunday, with several current and former Kona podium finishers on the start list. Reigning Ironman world champion Sebastian Kienle (GER) will be racing this distance for the first time since his big Kona win, and will look to defend his European crown in his home country. 2013 Ironman world champion Fredrik Van Lierde (BEL) finished second to Kienle at this race last year and then went on to have a disappointing race in Kona, but he’s coming off of an impressive victory at the Ironman African Championships back in March and is showing the form that earned him the world title two years ago. Perhaps the athlete that many will be most excited to watch is 2008 Olympic gold medalist and 2014 Kona third-place finisher Jan Frodeno (GER). Frodeno has competed in two Ironman events (this race last year and Kona) and, despite several setbacks in both races, managed to finish third each time. Other top Ironman veterans making the start include Eneko Llanos (ESP), Andreas Raelert (GER), Bas Diederen (NED), Andi Bocherer (GER), Marko Albert (EST) and Tyler Butterfield (BER).

The big story in the women’s race is the battle between Swiss starsand Bahrain Endurance 13 teammatesCaroline Steffen and Daniela Ryf. Steffen will be looking to again prove her ability to dominate at the distance after struggling in Kona last year and in Melbourne this year. Triathlon fans will be excited to see how Ryf can perform on this big stage. The former ITU star has been nearly flawless in her transition to long course, with an Ironman 70.3 World Championship title and Kona runner-up honors to her name. A dominant win in Frankfurt could solidify her status as a pre-race favorite for the Ironman World Championship title. Other contenders on the start list include Julia Gajer (GER), Tine Deckers (BEL), Kristin Moeller (GER), Michelle Vesterby (DEN) and Sonja Tajsich (GER).

RELATED PHOTOS: 2014 Ironman European Championships

See the professional start lists below:

Men
1 Sebastian Kienle (GER)
2 Frederik Van Lierde (BEL)
3 Jan Frodeno (GER)
4 Eneko Llanos (ESP)
5 Andreas Raelert (GER)
6 Bas Diederen (NED)
7 Andy Boecherer (GER)
8 Miquel Blanchart Tinto (ESP)
9 Carlos Lopez (ESP)
10 Michael Ruenz (GER)
13 Marko Albert (EST)
14 Simon Billeau (FRA)
15 Thomas Bosch (GER)
16 Tyler Butterfield (BER)
17 Emanuele Ciotti (ITA)
18 Martijn Dekker (NED)
19 Martin Droell (GER)
20 Thomas Kaiser (GER)
21 Lachlan Kerin (AUS)
22 Maxim Kriat (RUS)
23 Ludovic Le Guellec (FRA)
24 Wouter Monchy (BEL)
25 Young Hwan Oh (KOR)
26 Gilian Oriet (SUI)
27 Mark Oude Bennink (NED)
29 Lukas Polan (CZE)
30 Mario Radevic (GER)
31 Evgenii Rulevskii (RUS)
32 Evert Scheltinga (NED)
33 Andreas Thissen (GER)
34 David Dellow (AUS)
35 Marek Nemcik (SVK)
37 Alfred Rahm (GER)
39 Frederic Limousin (FRA)
40 Ivan Jezko (SVK)
41 Anton Blokhin (URK)
42 Juha Laitinen (FIN)
43 David Jilek (CZE)
44 Fabio Carvalho (BRA)
45 Mathias Nagel (GER)
46 Maksim Kalinin (RUS)
47 Lewis Elliot (USA)

Women
51 Caroline Steffen (SUI)
52 Daniela Ryf (SUI)
53 Julia Gajer (GER)
54 Tine Deckers (BEL)
55 Kristin Moeller (GER)
56 Michelle Vesterby (DEN)
57 Ruth Brennan-Morrey (USA)
58 Katharina Grohmann (GER)
59 Helena Herrero Gomez (ESP)
60 Tine Holst (DEN)
61 Annett Kamenz (GER)
64 Nicole Woysch (GER)
66 Sonja Tajsich (GER)
67 Astrid Ganzow (GER)

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Etiquette Rules Of Trail Running http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/training/etiquette-rules-of-trail-running_118318 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/training/etiquette-rules-of-trail-running_118318#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 19:42:18 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=118318

Illustrations in the book are by Charlie Layton.

Trail runners are a pretty laid-back crew, which means that trail running etiquette isn’t necessarily about hard-and-fast rules.

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Illustrations in the book are by Charlie Layton.

Trail runners are a pretty laid-back crew, which means that trail running etiquette isn’t necessarily about hard-and-fast rules. It’s mainly about good manners and courtesy. This excerpt from veteran trail runner Lisa Jhung’s new book Trailhead: The Dirt on All Things Trail Running offers handy rules of thumb on how to be a good trail citizen.

etiquette \’et-i-kit, -ket\ n. 1. The practices and forms prescribed by social convention or by authority. 2. A code of ethical behavior that makes the trail (and the world) a better place.

Two Golden Rules of the Trail

  1. Be courteous. The most important thing for all trail users to remember is to be courteous. A smile and a friendly attitude go a long way in keeping everyone’s trail experience positive.
  1. Follow the rules. In some instances, there are actual written rules. Some trail signs let users know who’s allowed: horses, bikes, foot travelers, or some combination of these. Some signs alert users to one-way trails—most common at Nordic centers (open to runners in the dry months), and mountain bike centers.

Some trails are open only to bikes on certain days of the week and only to foot travel and/or equestrians on other days. It is important for safety and courtesy to follow all trail signs.

Right of Way

Runners aren’t the only ones who use trails. Mountain bikers, equestrians, hikers, rock climbers, and birders are all trail users. Some trails are wide enough for multiple trail users to pass one another, but others may be too narrow. Singletrack, by definition, is only wide enough for a single user, and so when two parties meet on a singletrack trail, one must yield to the other.

Rule of Thumb: “Yield” means pull over to the side of the trail to let another pass. When yielding, it is polite to alert the other party that they’ve been yielded to and can proceed freely by saying something like You’re good.

RELATED: 5 Reasons To Try Trail Running

Understanding the Needs of Others

Posted rules or not, putting yourself in the shoes of people you encounter on the trail and understanding their needs and their thinking can help you distinguish who should yield to whom.

Other trail runners. Encountering fellow trail runners while running can be a beautiful thing. You nod cheerfully to one another, say a simple Hi, and pass by knowing you’re part of the same tribe.

Hikers. Trails are filled with hikers of many stripes. Casual hikers may be friends having a serious talk: And then he said, “You’re turning into your mother!Oh, no, he didn’t! Or speed hikers wearing sweat-wicking performance apparel and a determined look on their faces. Or contemplative journalers: I need to get to my rock. And then there are families with small children, doing their best to share nature and keep meltdowns at bay. These hikers are entitled to the trail as much as you are and aren’t necessarily paying attention to you running, so let courtesy and common sense prevail.

Old couples holding hands. Older couples holding hands on trails should always have the right of way. Pass with care.

Up-to-somethings. Groups of young adults sometimes congregate on trails to smoke, drink, make out, or all of the above. Pass with care. And if you see your neighbor’s kid, make a mental note as you pass by.

Dog walkers. Depending on the trail and the dog owner, canines may or may not be on a leash. Be friendly when you pass by, and consider lowering a hand for the dog to sniff.

Birders/naturalists. Folks on the trail with binoculars, walking slowly while looking up, may be birders spotting warblers. Similar folks looking down may be naturalists hunting for mushrooms. Either will be busy identifying flora and fauna and may be unprepared to jump out of your way. Don’t sneak up on them. Announce yourself with a friendly hello. (Or if you can screech like a low-swooping red-tailed hawk, try that.)

Equestrians. Horses are allowed on some of the same trails as runners. Take care not to spook a horse. Speak gently to it, and yield to the horse and rider, passing with care when there’s room. Step to the downhill side of the trail or off to the side. Continue talking calmly as the animal passes by.

Mountain bikers. Mountain bikers sometimes get a bad rap for allegedly ripping around corners and charging down trails, scaring other trail users. But courteous mountain bikers don’t cause problems; jerk mountain bikers (or runners or equestrians) do. While rules give foot traffic the right of way, let’s face it: It’s easier for you to move to the side of a trail than it is for them. Be courteous and consider giving them the right of way so they don’t eat it.

Wheeled, motorized mechanisms. All-terrain vehicles, dirt bikes, and snowmobiles frequent certain trails. They’re big, fast, and— thankfully—noisy, so you can get out of the way when you hear one. This is one of many good reasons to not wear headphones on a trail run.

Adapted with permission of VeloPress from Trailhead: The Dirt on All Things Trail Running by Lisa Jhung with illustrations by Charlie Layton. For more, visit velopress.com/trail.

RELATED: Are You Cut Out For Ultrarunning?

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