Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com Triathlon Training, Gear, Nutrition, Photos, Race Results & Calendars Fri, 06 Mar 2015 16:13:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0.1 Life Time Cuts Pro Prize Purse http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/news/life-time-cuts-pro-prize-purse_113103 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/news/life-time-cuts-pro-prize-purse_113103#comments Fri, 06 Mar 2015 15:46:30 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=113103

The pro women start the race at the 2014 Life Time Tri Minneapolis race. Photo: Nick Morales

The decision continues the ongoing discussion of what role professionals and prize money play in the growth of the sport.

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The pro women start the race at the 2014 Life Time Tri Minneapolis race. Photo: Nick Morales

The decision continues the ongoing discussion of what role professional triathletes play in the sport and how much they should be paid for top performances.

Life Time Tri, the leading race series for short course, non-drafting competition, revealed this week it would eliminate most of its professional prize purse in favor of focusing on the age-group experience.

“We continue to see significant opportunities to introduce more men and women to engage in this healthy way of life sport, while enhancing the range of available tools and training programs they need to prepare and succeed,” Life Time Senior Vice President Kimo Seymour said in an email to Triathlete on Thursday, March 6. “With this in mind, and in order to concentrate our investments in this realm, we have made the decision to discontinue offering a pro purse (aside from the Panasonic New York City Triathlon).”

Last year the pro series consisted of Life Time Tri South Beach, Life Time Tri Cap Tex, Life Time Minneapolis Triathlon, the New York City Triathlon, the Chicago Triathlon and the championship race in Oceanside. At that final event in Oceanside in October, Life Time handed out a $200,000 prize purse for the individual race, $200,000 for the overall series and $50,000 as part of its Toyota Triple Crown Series.

The shift in focus (and dollars) will turn to growing existing and new triathlon events as well as other Life Time initiatives, such as the beginner-friendly Commit to Tri series and the Women For Tri initiative.

What This Means For Non-Drafting, Short Course Athletes

Life Time’s news came as a devastating blow to many short-course specialists, still reeling from last month’s news the HyVee Elite Cup Triathlon, once a 1.1 million dollar event, would cease to exist.

“With the Hy-Vee Triathlon no longer taking place in addition to the Life Time Series, short course non-drafting is almost nonexistent for professionals,” said pro Sarah Haskins, who won the series championship in 2011 and 2012. “There are still a few iconic races on the schedule, like the St. Anthony’s Triathlon and Alcatraz.”

“I’m disappointed about the loss of a great American race series that provided both new and experienced local professionals with an opportunity to race in the states, in front of home crowds, while providing motivation and encouragement to triathletes that usually just watch us on webcasts while we race in remote destinations,” said pro Sara McLarty, who won the series in 2010.

American Alicia Kaye, the two-time reigning series champion who has made a large part of her living on the Life Time Series, expressed concern over what this means for the sport on Twitter.

@AliciaKayeTri: “Stunned that @LTFTriSeries is cancelled. Grateful & thankful to be a part of it for 4 years, but saddened to see iconic US races w/ no pros.”

“Also curious how no Oly. Distance non draft pro racing w/ $, may affect the development of our sport.”

Thanking Life Time

Though the reaction from the pro community has been mostly of concern for the distance/sport, a few pros also thanked Life Time for their contribution over the years.

Greg Bennett, who made a career off of the series back in the early 2000s and took home a large chunk of change for sweeping the entire series in 2007, reacted on Twitter.

@GregBennett1: “@LTFTrisSeries @LifeTimeFitness Thanks for the most amazing 14 years. Your support & commitment to #Triathlon and the pro’s was 2nd to none!”

“I am very grateful for the opportunity to race in the Life Time Series in years past,” Haskins told us. “I hope that soon another prestigious short course non-drafting race series will happen here in the United States.”

“I am grateful for the many years that I raced the Lifetime/Toyota Cup races and the support that they have provided for 10-plus years,” McLarty commented.

Four-time Olympian Hunter Kemper, who has consistently raced on the Life Time circuit, also thanked the organization on Twitter.

@HunterKemper: “THANK YOU @LifeTimeTri @lifetimefitness for changing triathlon w/ your historic prize $, media, and visibility the past 15 years! GRATEFUL!”

The Big Picture

The Life Time news is a part of a bigger development happening in the sport of triathlon. Last year, we named the issue of prize purse changes the most impactful development of 2014. What are professional triathletes’ roles in the growth of the sport and how much do they deserve to be paid for top performances?

ITU, Ironman, Rev3, Challenge and now Life Time have all made drastic prize purse changes—some adding, some redistributing and some all-together eliminating money—over the past 12 months on this front.

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Quick Set Friday: Paddles And Fins http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/training/quick-set-friday-paddles-and-fins_60218 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/training/quick-set-friday-paddles-and-fins_60218#comments Fri, 06 Mar 2015 15:31:22 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=60218

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Bored at the pool? Here is a fun swim workout to try out this weekend.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

Triathlete contributor and swimming all-star Sara McLarty has a blog with more than 500 creative workouts used in her Masters swim program in Clermont, Fla. We’ll feature a workout every Friday so you have new ideas to take to the pool. On her blog (Mastersswimworkoutsbysaramclarty.blogspot.com), you can pick a Monday set for a long distance focus, a Wednesday set for sprint training, or Friday for creative open water skills.

The A sets are between 4–5000 yards total, with intervals ranging from 1:20–1:30 per 100. The B sets are 3000–3500 total, with intervals of 1:50–2:00 per 100. The C sets are 2000–2500 total and all based on a rest interval.

A:
500 warm up
8×50 @ :60 (kick/drill by 25…IM order)
8×75 @ 1:20 (odds: fly/bk/br; evens: bk/br/free)
8×25 pull @ :30
5×150 pull @ 2:05
8×25 swim @ :30
5×150 swim @ 2:10
8×25 w/fins @ :30
5×150 w/fins @ 2:00
8×50 @ :60 freestyle drill choice
200 cool down
*4900 Total*

RELATED – Ask Coach Sara: Battling Foot Cramps

B:
500 warm up
6×50 @ 1:20 (kick/drill by 25)
6×75 @ 1:30 (3/5/3 breathing pattern by 25)
6×25 pull @ :40
4×150 pull @ 3:00
6×25 swim @ :40
4×150 swim @ 2:45
6×25 w/fins @ :30
4×150 w/fins @ 2:30
200 cool down
*3700 Total*

RELATED – Ask Coach Sara: What Is A Normal Breathing Pattern?

C:
400 warm up
6×50 w/:20 sec rest (kick/drill by 25)
6×75 w/:30 sec rest (3/5/3 breathing pattern by 25)
6×25 pull @ :50
3×150 pull w/:30 sec rest
6×25 swim @ :50
3×150 swim w/:30 sec rest
100 cool down
*2500 Total*

More Quick Set Friday workouts.

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Avoid The Dreaded Race Bonk http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/nutrition/avoid-race-bonk-fuel_72386 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/nutrition/avoid-race-bonk-fuel_72386#comments Fri, 06 Mar 2015 15:11:14 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=72386

Illustration by Matt Collins.

Never underestimate your fueling needs on the bike (and run), even at a shorter distance.

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Illustration by Matt Collins.

Never underestimate your fueling and nutrition needs on the bike (and run), even at a shorter distance.

My 2012 race season culminated with a trip to France for the World Duathlon Championships in late September. I’d spent the summer achieving my very best run and bike fitness to date and was physically prepared for a top-10 age-group placing—or so I had hoped.

I began by running a surprisingly comfortable 38:16 opening 10K, which put me into the top 20 of a highly competitive 45–49 age group. I moved up steadily, while repeating my chosen mantra for the day: “This is so cool, this is so cool, this is so cool!”

With a smooth and swift transition I was on the bike and fired up to tackle a challenging course that seemed custom-designed for my strengths as a roadie.

Through three of five laps, I’d moved into 10th place—easily passing otherwise stronger time-trialers who were struggling through the technically demanding sections. Soon after starting my fourth lap, however, I started to lose focus and my power dropped from the 240 watts I’d been averaging to less than 160 watts. I was a little nauseous while simultaneously feeling really hungry, and could do nothing to stop my race goals from slipping away as I weaved through those final two agonizing laps.

I stumbled through transition and headed out onto the final 5K run, but I was barely able to make a running motion as my hand found the course tape to ensure that I stayed both upright and heading in the proper direction. Forty-one pitiful minutes later I’d achieved the very rare distinction of having covered the closing 5K in more time than the opening 10K. I had bonked spectacularly.

Deconstructing the “bonk”
A bonk is technically the depletion of stored glycogen, which is the primary fuel source for higher intensity exercise. When you “hit the wall,” you are forced to slow significantly to utilize your only remaining fuel source—fat, which requires a far greater presence of oxygen. You can avoid bonking by topping off carbohydrates in the day or two leading up to your event, having a good understanding of how fast and far you can go before depleting your supply, and adequately replenishing carbs during the race. While we burn a mix of carbs (limited) and fat (unlimited) during moderate exercise, most of us will burn nearly 100 percent carbs at the intensity required for a race of this distance or a sprint or Olympic triathlon.

RELATED – Ask A Pro: What Was Your Biggest Nutrition Mistake?

Do the math!
Had I spent a few minutes projecting the caloric burn for my event, the results would have clearly shown that I’d need at least 2,000 calories to reach the finish line at race speed. Even if I were lucky enough to start the race with a full tank of gas (I wasn’t), I’d still be cutting it really close. Then, factor in a solid warm-up and a three- to four-hour fast following breakfast before my 1:10 p.m. start, and I’d surely need 400–600 carb calories during the race: ideally a gel on the start line, a 20-ounce bottle of sports drink on the bike, and perhaps another gel approaching T2—all quite manageable logistically.

Rehearse
Had I been aware of this critical estimation heading into the specific race prep phase of my training, I would have executed workouts designed not only to improve performance at race pace, but also to practice race fueling strategies.

Write it down
I’ve been using a race plan worksheet for years to help my long-course racing, but now I realize the benefits of this tool for shorter distances. Make your own simple worksheet with prompts such as pre-race meals and snacks, race morning breakfast, start line “top off” snack, race pacing, race fuel, hydration, electrolytes, goals (both time- and non-time-based), and anything else you think will best help you to visualize and plan your best race.

RELATED – World Champs Wisdom: Triathlon Lessons From The Pros

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Quick Tip: How To Tackle Hills On The Run http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/training/quick-tip-tackle-hills-run_113098 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/training/quick-tip-tackle-hills-run_113098#comments Fri, 06 Mar 2015 13:32:44 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=113098

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Elite coach Darren Smith provides guidelines for tackling two different types of hills.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com


Elite coach Darren Smith focuses a lot on fine-tuning technique for all three sports with the high-level athletes on his “D-Squad.” He compares the adaptations you need to run well uphill to the ones you make going from swimming in a pool to open water: Start with body alignment and a strong paddle, then incorporate the specifics on top, like sighting efficiently, breathing to the other side every so often and shortening your stroke. When running uphill, Smith says, “layer good basic run mechanics—strong alignment, good core—with more arms and a little bit of lean into the hill. Start with fundamentals and add in the nice bits on top.”

RELATED: The Secrets To Running Downhill Fast

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Recipe Of The Week: BBQ Chicken Chopped Salad http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/magazine/recipe-week-bbq-chicken-chopped-salad_113090 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/magazine/recipe-week-bbq-chicken-chopped-salad_113090#comments Thu, 05 Mar 2015 20:49:08 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=113090

Use rotisserie chicken to make this quick salad, which is loaded with nutrient dense carbohydrates, veggies and flavor.

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Use rotisserie chicken to make this quick salad, which is loaded with nutrient dense carbohydrates, veggies and flavor.

Ingredients

Makes 4 servings
8-10 heaping cups mixed greens, romaine, or baby spinach
¼ cup fresh cilantro, finely chopped
1 rotisserie chicken, meat removed and chopped
2 cups yams or sweet potatoes, chopped
1 1/3 cup corn*
1 cup black beans, drained and rinsed
1 red pepper, chopped
1 avocado, sliced
¾ cup BBQ sauce
¼ cup balsamic vinaigrette
*Try grilling 2-3 cobs corn for extra flavor

RELATED: Roasted Chicken Made Easy

Preparation

1. In a bowl, toss the rotisserie chicken with ½ cup of the BBQ sauce.
2. In another small bowl, whisk together the remaining ¼ cup BBQ sauce with the balsamic vinaigrette, and reserve this dressing.
3. Use a large platter, or four dinner plates/bowls to arrange the salad.
4. Toss the mixed greens and cilantro with a conservative amount of the dressing and place on the platter or plates/bowls.
5. Arrange the remaining ingredients on top of the greens. If making individual plates, divide the greens into four portions. Scatter ½ cup chicken, ½ cup yams, 1/3 cup corn, ¼ cup black beans, and ¼ (each) of the diced red pepper and avocado, over each portion of the greens.
6. Drizzle leftover dressing over the top of the salad if desired.

More recipes from Jessica Cerra.

Jessica Cerra is the owner of Fit Food by Jess, a private chef and catering company in Encinitas, Calif., and the co-founder of Harmony Bar. A former professional XTERRA triathlete, Cerra now races for Twenty16 Women’s Professional Cycling Team.

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Abu Dhabi Debut Kicks Off 2015 WTS Season Saturday http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/news/abu-dhabi-debut-kicks-off-2015-wts-season-saturday_113088 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/news/abu-dhabi-debut-kicks-off-2015-wts-season-saturday_113088#comments Thu, 05 Mar 2015 20:28:30 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=113088

Gomez will compete in Abu Dhabi one week after a DNF at Challenge Dubai. Photo: Getty images for Challenge

Both reigning ITU world championships will race this weekend in Abu Dhabi.

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Gomez will compete in Abu Dhabi one week after a DNF at Challenge Dubai. Photo: Getty images for Challenge

The ITU World Triathlon Series kicks off this weekend in Abu Dhabi and a stellar pro field will be on the start line, including both reigning ITU world champions. This will be the first time that a WTS race has been held in the Middle East (this is the 16th country that has hosted a WTS race since the series started in 2009), and the race will be a sprint (750-meter swim, 20K bike, 5K run)—the eighth ever sprint race in the series. With the potential of warm temperatures and high winds, Abu Dhabi could make for an exciting venue and might have new athletes atop the podium.

Men’s Race
In the men’s race four-time ITU world champion Javier Gomez (ESP) headlines a deep pro field that includes nine of the top 10 ranked men, but Gomez has yet to win a WTS sprint race. Three other men in this field have won ITU sprint races, including world No. 3 Jonathan Brownlee (GBR), who’s won four out of the seven ever held, Mario Mola (ESP), ranked second after last season, and Richard Murray (RSA). Other top athletes who could make their way onto the podium include Joao Pereira (POR), Allessandro Fabian (ITA), Vincent Luis (FRA) and Sven Riederer (SUI).

Some up-and-comers who’ll be toeing the line in Abu Dhabi include Under23 World Championship medalists Dorian Coninx (FRA) and Gordon Benson (GBR). Also, fourth-place Olympics finisher David Hauss (FRA) could be a factor in the race. Of note to U.S. triathlon fans, American Alan Webb will be making his WTS debut this weekend.

Find the full men’s start list here.

RELATED: 10 Reasons We’re Excited For The 2015 ITU Season

Women’s race
With the two top women in the world—Americans Gwen Jorgensen and Sarah True (née Groff)—on the start line (with a target on their backs), the race is guaranteed to be an exciting, fast sprint race. Jorgensen is now the winningest woman in WTS history, and she’s claimed two sprint titles out of the seven ever held, but this field features several other women who’ve won on the 5K run, including True, Olympic bronze medalist Erin Densham (AUS), Olympic silver medalist Lisa Norden (SWE), Barbara Riveros (CHI) and Anne Haug (GER).

Both Densham and Norden are both big questions marks in this race, as they’ve been battling injuries and/or illness since London—Abu Dhabi will be a good test of their early-season fitness. Another notable woman on the start list is the extremely consistent WTS winner Andrea Hewitt (NZL), who finished up the 2014 WTS season with a runner-up finish in Edmonton and getting bronze in the series. If the winds pick up on race day, also keep an eye out for strong cyclists such as Hewitt, Lucy Hall (GBR), Haug, Commonwealth Games champ Jodie Stimpson (GBR) and two-time ITU world champ Emma Moffatt (AUS) to take advantage of the conditions.

Find the full women’s start list here.

Watch the races
Follow the action starting at 3 p.m. local time on Saturday, March 7 (that’s 6 a.m. East Coast time and 3 a.m. Pacific time), and the men follow at 5 p.m. local time. Follow all of the action live at Triathlonlive.tv (use code ROADTORIO to get a 20% discount on the season pass) and on Twitter @triathlonlive. You can also check out Trifecta this year—create a new login and pick your favorites at Trifecta.usatriathlon.org.

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Should I Drink Coffee Before My Triathlon? http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/nutrition/should-i-drink-coffee-before-my-triathlon_74426 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/nutrition/should-i-drink-coffee-before-my-triathlon_74426#comments Thu, 05 Mar 2015 17:31:35 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=74426

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Sports dietitian Lauren Antonucci answers a question about coffee on race day and addresses the myth that it can cause dehydration.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

Q: I love my morning cup of coffee. Should I cut it out on race morning to stay hydrated and improve my performance?

A: Every time I give a sports nutrition talk to a group or team, this question is asked. I too look forward to my morning coffee for a host of reasons—taste, warmth, morning ritual, and a wake-up “boost.” Should we cut it out on race morning? Thankfully, the answer is no!

First, let’s dispel the dehydration myth. When consumed regularly, and at moderate amounts (see below), caffeinated coffee does not lead to dehydration or excessive urine loss, and therefore may be counted toward total fluid needs (phew!).

Now what about caffeine’s performance benefits? Dozens of studies have shown performance benefits of caffeine consumption in athletes, including lower RPE (rate of perceived exertion), improved endurance performance and clearer concentration.

However, there are downsides. Caffeine can act as a G.I. stimulant, and while most triathletes are happy to have pre-race toilet time, excessive caffeine consumption (from pre-race coffee and/or caffeinated sports products during a race) can lead to dreaded effects such as diarrhea or jitteriness.

What to do? My recommendation is to start by cutting your usual caffeine intake in half on race morning. Less than your usual caffeine dose, coupled with normal pre-race excitement, should lead to desired alertness and an overall good race situation. Of course, each individual responds differently, so practice in early-season races and adjust this (and all pre- and during race fueling) until you find what works best for you.

RELATED: The Pros And Cons To Caffeine-Infused Training And Racing

How much coffee is OK?
A moderate amount is considered 3–6mg per kilogram of body weight. To convert to pounds, multiply your weight in pounds by 0.45 to find your weight in kilograms. That means for a 120-pound triathlete, you could drink around 160–320 mg of caffeine. A 160-pound triathlete could drink 220–440mg. For reference, one 8oz cup of coffee averages 100–150mg of caffeine.

Clinical nutritionist and certified sports dietitian Lauren Antonucci is the owner/director of Nutrition Energy in New York City.

RELATED – Caffeine for Triathlon Performance: How Little Is Enough?

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10 Reasons We’re Excited For The 2015 ITU Season http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/photos/10-reasons-excited-2015-itu-season_113076 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/photos/10-reasons-excited-2015-itu-season_113076#comments Thu, 05 Mar 2015 17:03:48 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=113076

The 2015 World Triathlon Series, which kicks off this Saturday in Abu Dhabi, will have big Olympic qualifying implications.

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RELATED PHOTOS – 2014 Female Triathlete Of The Year: Gwen Jorgensen

RELATED PHOTOS – 2014 Male Triathlete Of The Year: Javier Gomez

RELATED – 2016 Olympics Update: Where The U.S. Stands Now

Bethany Mavis, Jené Shaw and Liz Hichens contributed to this story.

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How To Get Back To Speedwork http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/training/get-back-speedwork_95041 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/training/get-back-speedwork_95041#comments Thu, 05 Mar 2015 13:16:00 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=95041

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Avoid injury and start your season strong with this progression from off-season workouts to speed training.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

Avoid injury and start your season strong with this progression from off-season workouts to speed training.

Earlier I detailed the steps you should take before you jump back into speedwork for the season. You’ll want to ease back in, and start with 4–6 weeks of baseline running with a focus on form before you hit the hills or track. Once you’re ready, these workouts will serve as a good re-introduction to speedwork.

Workouts

Progression to speed
If at all possible, run a 5K race after your base period to establish some pacing guidelines. Having a pace guideline such as Jack Daniels’ VDOT (Runsmartproject.com/calculator) can help provide perspective on just how fast your intervals should be run.

Warm-up for all workouts
– 10 minutes of easy running. 4 minutes picking up the pace to enter your endurance heart rate zone.
– 10 minutes of dynamic stretching.
– „6×20 sec stride-outs on a 1–2% downhill grade. Work on “letting go” and improving your foot speed rather than effort. Recover back to your starting point after each.
– „During Weeks 5–8, do your stride-outs on a 1–2% uphill grade. Work on building power into that faster stride. Don’t forget to sufficiently cool down after every run!

RELATED: Do Speedwork Now, Benefit Later

Weeks 1–4

Focus: The skill of running fast (foot speed, fluid upper-body movement, posture)

Three run formats: 

1. Pure speed—short intervals. Set example: 4–8 x 200 meters at 5K effort, pushing the foot speed in the final 20 meters of each. Recover fully with 200 meters back to your starting point. Keep these efforts on a flat to 1 percent uphill road. Note: If you fail by more than 10 percent on an interval, your session is finished. This is typically an indication of oncoming injury or that you have sufficiently taxed the system.

2. Fartlek—to work on changing paces (fartleks in this period should be based on time, increasing speed from endurance to no more than 5K pace). Take that 3–4 miles that you were running at your base and add fartlek intervals (20 sec on /40 sec off for a full mile with 2–3 minutes recovery in between).

3. Endurance—a continued challenge of your base run.

RELATED – Dear Coach: When Can I Get Back To Speedwork?

Weeks 5–8

Focus: Expanding the mental skill of holding fast (foot speed under duress, fluid upper-body movement, mental focus at the end of the effort)

Same three run formats:

Fartlek runs can be expanded to longer periods of time or shorter periods of rest. The endurance run should extend slightly over time, but keep it in line with the event you are training for and the timing of your season plan.

Pure speedwork should be done once per week (expand based on experience). Mix up the distances to get 2,500–4,000 meters of speedwork (if you have a coach, work with him or her on what distances are appropriate). Build your repeat distances over time—either vary them for fun or keep them consistent to gauge progress. Run no more than 800 meters (or 4:00) if your mile pace during speedwork is above 7:30 per mile. If you are running sub-7:30 pace, run up to 1,200 or 5:00 max per interval.

RELATED: Beginning Runner’s Speed Workout

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Runner, Interrupted: Alan Webb’s New Olympic Dream http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/features/runner-interrupted-alan-webbs-new-olympic-dream_113062 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/features/runner-interrupted-alan-webbs-new-olympic-dream_113062#comments Wed, 04 Mar 2015 19:52:38 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=113062

Photo: John David Becker

What happens when you take one of the best American runners of all time and turn him into a triathlete? Hopefully an Olympic medal.

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Photo: John David Becker

What happens when you take one of the best American runners of all time and turn him into a triathlete? Hopefully, for Alan Webb, an Olympic medal.

Ask anyone who was on a high school track team around the early 2000s who the biggest name in running was, and chances are they’ll all answer the same: Alan Webb.

Webb first achieved national status when he broke the four-minute mile barrier as a high school senior (in 2001)—first indoors in 3:59.86, and then, months later, by breaking Jim Ryun’s 36-year-old record by a full two seconds with a 3:53.43. In 2007, he set (and still holds) the American mile record, 3:46.91.

For almost a decade, Webb accumulated a list of accolades that solidified his legendary status in the running world: He holds impressive PRs for the 800 meters (1:43) to the 10,000 meters (27:34), he won the 1500-meter final at the 2004 U.S. Olympic Trials; and, perhaps most notably, his record-setting mile, ran at a meet in Belgium in 2007.

His illustrious accomplishments led to a level of celebrity not common for a young track star—an appearance on “The David Letterman Show,” a book written about his sub-4:00 quest, countless magazine covers and articles, a Nike contract and a frequent spot on Internet running forums.

With the trajectory he had become accustomed to, Webb had his sights set high. “I didn’t want to think that the American record was going to be my best. I wanted to break it,” he says. “I wanted to break my own record and run faster and have a medal—I didn’t want to rest on my laurels and sit back and say, ‘Oh this is as good as I can do.’”

Eventually his streak of success started to resemble a rollercoaster. He navigated through a series of discouraging results (including missing the 2008 and 2012 Olympic teams) and an array of injuries. He switched distances, coaches, locations, seemingly anything to try to get back to the runner he once was, all while dealing with toxic message board participants scrutinizing his every move and the feeling of defeat that came along with not living up to his own standards. “I made a lot of mistakes with myself,” Webb admits. “Everything—training, moving and living situations, coaching, just my own mentality, to name a few, but I think that after all that, if things had happened differently, I might have wanted to continue even if I wasn’t setting PRs.” His frustration led to the decision to retire from running after the February 2014 Millrose Games.

“I had lofty goals and I accomplished some of those goals—not all of them to be honest—and I got to the point where I felt like, after another round of injuries and disappointing performances, kind of coming to terms with the fact that I had given everything I could give as a professional runner,” Webb says. “I had come to the point where I just wanted to do something else.”

That “something else” for some retired athletes is a transition to coaching or corporate America. For 32-year-old Webb, it’s racing triathlon. And not just as a side hobby—he wants to go to the 2016 Olympics.

RELATED: Alan Webb Makes Triathlon Debut

“My original dream was to be an Olympic swimmer.”

Webb was in eighth grade when Athens was awarded the 2004 Olympics, and his sister Lisa brought him back a T-shirt from her visit to Greece. At the time, he wore it with the dream of competing in the Games—as a swimmer. Growing up in Reston, Va., he swam on a club team starting at age 11. He excelled in the pool, but his talent in running was undeniable, and juggling the two sports became too much by the time he was a sophomore in high school. He had to make a choice, and that choice was running.

“It was tough at the time—to give up that journey,” Webb says. “It was maybe a false hope at that point to think I could be an Olympic swimmer, but to give that up to be a runner … I think I made the right choice. I had instant success and I realized, ‘Whoa—I’m not good, I’m really good.”

He held on to that T-shirt, though, and wore it during warm-up at every meet in 2004 leading up to Athens, where he ran the 1500 meters (he got cut after the first qualifying round). And even though he stopped competing in the pool as a teenager, he never completely lost sight of swimming—Webb actually says his best years in running (2006–2007) were when he was cross-training the most in the pool.

RELATED: Alan Webb Becomes A Triathlete

“I’m in uncharted territory.”

Nearing the end of his running career, Webb started conversations with the leaders of USA Triathlon’s High Performance Team, whose goals are to identify and develop elite athletes with Olympic potential. Head coach Jonathan Hall urged him to come watch a super-sprint race in San Diego in the fall of 2013. Webb’s somewhat naïve curiosity led to genuine interest.

“It took someone grabbing the reins and bringing him down here to have a look at it,” Hall says. “And reassuring him that it was something he was capable of doing. I guess we were recruiting from one point of view, but trying not to sell anything, so to speak. We wanted to give him a clear picture if this was something he wanted to do.”

For someone who lived and breathed one regimented sport for most of his adult life, the idea of the unknown appealed to Webb. The pressure of beating his old times would be lifted. The lack of expectations would allow for a fresh start. And he could have the potential to be really good again.

USAT coaches took Webb under their collective wing and guided him through the process of learning what draft-legal ITU racing was all about and essentially taught him how to train for triathlon. Hall added more purpose to Webb’s swim workouts, introduced him to some tools like a power meter on the bike, and structured his training to get the most out of his time as a husband and father (he and wife Julia have a 2.5-year-old daughter, Joanie).

“I’m in uncharted territory for myself,” Webb says. “It’s a little bit scary. It’s kind of an exciting thing.”

Webb’s unique pedigree didn’t fit perfectly into any of USAT’s current programs, but he was in a similar situation to some of the athletes in the Collegiate Recruitment Program (CRP), best known for helping turn college runner and swimmer Gwen Jorgensen into the ITU world champion she is today. Last June, Webb attended a camp at the Olympic Training Center in Chula Vista, Calif., with some of the CRP athletes and Hall at the helm. “We make no apologies—the Collegiate Recruitment Program is kind of fast-track, predominantly athletes who have been competing at a high level mainly in track and field, that’s aimed to have success in the Olympics,” Hall says.

RELATED: The Search For Future U.S. Olympians

“I feel like I can’t really lose.”

Throughout the latter half of 2014, Webb eased his way into racing with a few sprints, first taking a win at the Life Time Tri Marquee in April. He got a spot on the U.S. mixed relay team that placed fifth at the World Triathlon Series race in Hamburg alongside Jorgensen, Kaitlin Donner and Ben Kanute. He placed in the top 10 in two Pan American Cups, and his most confidence-boosting result came at a World Cup in Tongyeong, Korea, in October, where he got 10th.

“You have dreams and you set goals for yourself, but there’s a difference between a goal and a realistic goal,” Webb says. “I think I was really happy the way I progressed last summer and it confirmed things that I wanted to believe. I really started to believe special things could happen for me in this sport.”

It was enough to convince him to go all-in and temporarily uproot the family from Beaverton, Ore., to Scottsdale, Ariz., in order to train exclusively with a small group of USAT high-level athletes through April 2015.

Thankfully he’s always had the important buy-in from Julia. “I had been bouncing this idea off of her a lot,” Webb says. “She knew how frustrated I was getting. I didn’t want to keep putting so much into my running and not getting anything out of it and not enjoying it. She saw that, and she saw the fact that triathlon presented a new type of goal for me, and she was really supportive of it. She knows that, in athletics, there’s a timeline for these goals.”

Although he’s still a relative newbie who admits he’s made plenty of mistakes—like looking down at his feet while putting on his bike shoes and winding up with his face on the sidewalk during a race—Webb’s athletic hunger has been revived.

“It’s brought back my desire to be competitive, or to feel like I have the potential to be competitive,” he says. “That’s part of what I lost—I didn’t really see the light at the end of the tunnel. I guess I wanted to redefine what competitive means. It was hard for me to keep having to lower my expectations for myself as a runner. I had reached a pretty high level, the highest level, and so it was hard to dig real deep to claw my way back to that. I understood you have to take steps, but it was difficult to readjust my goals properly. … Whereas now, I’m starting from the bottom. You have to. My expectations are a little bit different than they would have been, in a positive way.”

Without backing from a big-name sponsor or the knowledge base to navigate the complicated Olympic qualifying system, Webb has relied heavily on (and has been grateful to have) USAT’s guidance. He knows the next two years will involve a lot of travel and racing to acquire enough points to earn his spot on the starting line of WTS races (ITU’s highest level) in 2015. He’s taking his new venture step by step with a renewed sense of optimism.

“I feel like I can’t really lose—and I love being in that position,” Webb says. “I’ve been through a lot and I have a different perspective now. It’s only going to be a success, because the purpose is to get the best out of myself. You can’t tell me that I failed; I’m the only person who’s measuring that. I’m the only person who knows if I’m giving it my all. I know I can do that—and I am.”

RELATED – 2016 Olympics Update: Where The U.S. Stands Now

Olympics 2016: What are his chances?

There has never been an American man to podium at the Olympic Games. In 2012, the highest American male was Hunter Kemper, who placed 14th. Could Webb break that streak? “The door is surely open for [an American] man to take that spot and Alan certainly has the raw ingredients to do so if he continues on the current trajectory,” coach Jonathan Hall says. “Obviously the end game is to get him to Rio. And not just get him to Rio, but we quite openly talk about him on the podium in Rio.”

Training With Alan

What it’s like to have a running celebrity in the training group.

“Alan Webb is a larger-than-life character and there’s a lot of myth surrounding him. I think not only is this about looking at his now Olympic aspiration, but having him in the group with the athletes brings an incredible amount of character, humanity and humility. He’s a very interesting man, and it’s been already a huge positive to the program just to have him involved.”
–Coach Jonathan Hall

“It’s funny because a couple years ago, you would say ‘Alan Webb’ and you’d think—whoa. But now, it’s good because we’re friends [so] he’s just Alan Webb. He has been through a lot and has gone through the whole Olympics process through running, so he knows a lot about what works and what doesn’t. He brings a lot of experience in that way. I’ve been doing triathlons for a long time and he can ask me triathlon questions, and he’s been a great role model and mentoring me through questions I have.”
–Kevin McDowell, one of Webb’s Scottsdale training partners

RELATED: How Gwen Jorgensen’s 10K Time Stacks Up

Webb’s Running PRs

A look at his fastest times throughout his pro career.

800m — 1:43.84 (2007)

1,500m — 3:30.54 (2007)

Mile — 3:46.91 American Record (2007)

2 mile — 8:11 (2005)

5,000m — 13:10 (2005)

10,000m — 27:34* (2006)

*As a triathlon comparison, gold medalist Alistair Brownlee ran an open 10K on the track in 2013 in 28:32.

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Quick Look: Gear Geek Box http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/gear-tech/quick-look-gear-geek-box_113059 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/gear-tech/quick-look-gear-geek-box_113059#comments Wed, 04 Mar 2015 18:16:11 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=113059

The new Gear Geek Box is aimed at triathletes who love trying new products and gadgets.

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Subscription services have become popular in the nutrition realm, but the new Gear Geek Box is aimed at triathletes who love trying new products and gadgets. Each box is filled with more than $100 worth of gear such as goggles, waterproof sunscreen, massage tools or hydration products catered to your needs as an athlete. The curators come from an endurance sports background with roles at big name companies like Nike and Specialized, but they have an eye out for emerging brands with innovative products to share with the Gear Geek Box community. A single box starts at $50, and the cost per box goes down the more months you order at a time (three-, six- or 12-month options are available). Geargeekbox.com

RELATED: Try Our Favorite Snacks! Triathlete Partners With The Feed

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7 Simple Food Swaps For Better Nutrition http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/nutrition/tasty-and-simple-food-swaps-for-better-nutrition_26228 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/nutrition/tasty-and-simple-food-swaps-for-better-nutrition_26228#comments Wed, 04 Mar 2015 18:15:01 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=26228

Photo: Shutterstock.com

The key is to get creative and truly interested in your health and your food.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

Q: What are some easy switches I can make to my diet to yield the greatest nutritional benefits?

A: Minimizing refined carbohydrates such as sugary snacks and candy, white breads, pastas, cookies, cereals and sodas will be beneficial, and there are some great whole grains you can add to your diet, such as oats, barley, quinoa, bulgur, brown and wild rice, faro and spelt. Search for whole grain varieties of pastas, cereals and breads—just make sure you read labels carefully, including the back of the packet ingredient list and not just the front, where marketers weave their magic. True whole-grain varieties will be dense, filling and create less havoc with blood sugar levels and insulin response. Legumes, including lentils, garbanzo beans and cannellini beans, are also good substitutes for refined grains and provide valuable nutrients, including protein and fiber. The key is to get creative and truly interested in your health and your food.

RELATED: What Are Some Quick Swaps I Can Make To Improve My Diet?

Try some of these tasty and simple swaps:

1. Choose steel cut or whole rolled oats for breakfast over sugary refined cereals.

2. Replace white bread with pumpernickel or whole grain bread (not to be confused with multigrain).

3. Use barley, wild or brown rice to make a risotto or pilaf instead of white rice.

4. Substitute quinoa instead of pasta to make a lunch or side salad.

5. Puree white cannellini or butter beans with a little garlic and a dash of olive oil in place of mashed potatoes or boiled pasta.

6. Use yogurt instead of sour cream as a topping or dip.

7. Always use sugar, not artificial sweeteners. These can play havoc with your metabolism as well as train your taste buds to constantly require sweetness. You are better off using real ingredients and simply reducing portion sizes.

RELATED: 10 Healthy Grocery Store Options

 

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More People Finding Triathlon At An Older Age http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/news/people-finding-triathlon-older-age_113054 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/news/people-finding-triathlon-older-age_113054#comments Wed, 04 Mar 2015 17:07:56 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=113054

Athletes compete at the 2014 ITU Grand Final in Edmonton. Photo: Janos Schmidt/Triathlon.org

New York Times author Elizabeth Olson writes about the growing number of people using triathlon as a tool to stay healthy at an older age.

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Athletes compete at the 2014 ITU Grand Final in Edmonton. Photo: Janos Schmidt/Triathlon.org

New York Times author Elizabeth Olson writes about the growing number of people using triathlon as a tool to stay healthy at an older age.

Last  year, at 66, Jenny F. Scott was not an obvious triathlete. A retired special education teacher, she had suffered a stress fracture running decades ago and took up serious bicycling only when she was 64 years old.

But Ms. Scott, of West Columbia, S.C., and a friend decided to “bite the bullet last year, with no expectation other than we wanted to live through it,” she said of the swim-bike-run training needed to participate in the triathlon held locally each July.

“I didn’t win any prizes,” she said of last year’s race, adding, “I’m not about speed, just about finishing.”

She signed up for training again this year, and like growing numbers of people in their 50s and 60s — and some older — she has found a new challenge in triathlons and other sports that test discipline and endurance. Some opt to train for competitive swimming, or the senior tennis or golf circuits.
Continue reading the main story
Related Coverage

“There’s a dramatic shift taking place because more older people are adopting the attitude that I can—not that I’m unable because I’m older,” said Colin Milner, an expert on aging, who urges physical activity to stave off disabilities that often trouble seniors.

Read more: Nytimes.com

RELATED: Triathlon Training And Recovery For Ages 60+

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Jenks, Demarest Given USAT Junior Elite Honors http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/news/jenks-demarest-given-usat-junior-elite-honors_113050 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/news/jenks-demarest-given-usat-junior-elite-honors_113050#comments Wed, 04 Mar 2015 16:37:55 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=113050

Stephanie Jenks. Photo: Scott Taylor/ITU

Stephanie Jenks and Brent Demarest were today announced as the 2014 USA Triathlon Junior Elite Triathletes of the Year.

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Stephanie Jenks. Photo: Scott Taylor/ITU

Youth Olympic Games silver medalist Stephanie Jenks and 2014 USA Triathlon junior elite national champion Brent Demarest were today announced as the 2014 USA Triathlon Junior Elite Triathletes of the Year.

Read the announcement from USA Triathlon below:

Jenks (Aurora, Iowa) earned her spot on the U.S. Youth Olympic Games team with a win at the Games qualifier in Monterrey, Mexico. She then captured the silver medal at the in Nanjing, China, on her 17th birthday. Jenks, a top performer on the track, also raced her way to victory at the PATCO North American Junior Championships in Sarasota, Florida, and finished the season as the No. 1 ranked junior elite woman in the U.S.

“Stephanie was a true international performer in 2014, representing Team USA at Youth Olympic Games and both triathlon and track and field junior worlds championships,” said Steve Kelley, USA Triathlon Junior/U23 Program Manager. “She has a bright future in triathlon.”

Demarest (Charleston, S.C.) also had a standout year, winning the 2014 USA Triathlon Junior Elite National Championships and the Flatland Junior Elite Cup. Demarest was also the top U.S. finisher at the PATCO North American Junior Championships in Sarasota, finishing fifth overall. In addition to triathlon, Demarest attends the University of Virginia and is a member of the Cavaliers’ cross country team.

“Brent demonstrated great perseverance throughout the season,” Kelley said. “He is a talented up-and-coming triathlete, and had ITU Junior Worlds not conflicted with his obligation to report to his university cross country program, I believe we would have seen him battling for the podium.”

Jenks, Demarest and a number of other rising stars also earned recognition on USA Triathlon’s list of Junior Elite and Youth Elite All-Americans. The honor goes to the top up-and-coming triathletes in the United States and is based on their final national ranking and performance in top junior and youth draft-legal events.

RELATED: USA Triathlon Announces 2014 Triathletes Of The Year

2014 USA Triathlon Junior Elite Triathletes of the Year
Stephanie Jenks (Aurora, Iowa)
Brent Demarest (Charleston, S.C.)

2014 USA Triathlon Junior Elite All-Americans – Women (ages 16-19)
Avery Evenson (Colorado Springs, Colo.)
Tamara Gorman (Rapid City, S.D.)
Stephanie Jenks (Aurora, Iowa)
Taylor Knibb (Washington, D.C.)
Kyleigh Spearing (Frankfort, Ill.)
(HM) Megan Dustin (Feeding Hills, Mass.)
(HM) Katie Patrick (Sioux Falls, S.D.)

2014 USA Triathlon Junior Elite All-Americans – Men (ages 16-19)
Brent Demarest (Charleston, S.C.)
Eli Hemming (Kiowa, Colo.)
Seth Rider (Germantown, Tenn.)
Darr Smith (Atlanta, Ga.)
(HM) Max Bennett (Parker, Colo.)
(HM) Dillon Nobbs (La Verne, Calif.)

2014 USA Triathlon Youth Elite All-Americans – Girls (ages 13-15)
Kira Stanley (Acworth, Ga.)
Devon Kroeker (Colorado Springs, Colo.)
Page Lester (Washington, D.C.)
(HM) Audrey Ernst (South Elgin, Ill.)
(HM) Grace Obando (Herndon, Va.)
(HM) Sophia West (Decatur, Ga.)
(HM) Kenzi Wilson (Carmel, Ind.)

2014 USA Triathlon Youth Elite All-Americans – Boys (ages 13-15)
Nick Johnson (West Des Moines, Iowa)
Evan Parres (Dardenne Prairie, Mo.)
Ricardo Reyes (Riverview, Fla.)
(HM) Lane Barron (The Woodlands, Texas)
(HM) Julienne Harrison (Marietta, Ga.)
(HM) Drew Sotebeer (Parker, Colo.)
(HM) Zach Wilson (Carmel, Ind.)

HM – Honorable Mention

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Pro Bikes Of Challenge Dubai http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/photos/pro-bikes-challenge-dubai_113026 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/photos/pro-bikes-challenge-dubai_113026#comments Wed, 04 Mar 2015 14:08:15 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=113026

Get a look at the bikes the top athletes rode last weekend in the desert.

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Last weekend’s Challenge Dubai featured a stellar pro lineup. Get a look at the bikes the top athletes rode last weekend in the desert.

Photos provided by Triathlete Europe.

RELATED PHOTOS: 2015 Challenge Dubai

RELATED: Terenzo Bozzone, Daniela Ryf On Top At Challenge Dubai

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Life Time Tri Soma Becomes Ironman 70.3 Arizona http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/news/life-time-tri-soma-becomes-ironman-70-3-arizona_113020 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/news/life-time-tri-soma-becomes-ironman-70-3-arizona_113020#comments Tue, 03 Mar 2015 21:35:23 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=113020

Athletes compete at the 2014 Ironman Arizona. Photo: Rocky Arroyo/Endurapix

The half-iron distance Soma Triathlon, which has been produced by Life Time Fitness, will be Ironman 70.3 Arizona going forward.

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Athletes compete at the 2014 Ironman Arizona. Photo: Rocky Arroyo/Endurapix

The half-iron distance Soma Triathlon, which has been produced by Life Time Fitness, will be Ironman 70.3 Arizona going forward.

Ironman announced today that the first Ironman 70.3 Arizona will take place on Oct. 18 in Tempe. The event will replace the Soma Triathlon, which was first produced by Red Rock Co. and then Life Time Fitness. The race has been a staple on the Arizona triathlon schedule, with many Ironman Arizona participants choosing to compete as a warm-up for the longer event. The swim and run courseslike Ironman Arizonatake place in and around Tempe Town Lake. For the past few years, there has been chatter among Phoenix-area triathletes about the possibility of a less loopy bike course, but it appears the 56-mile leg will still feature three laps within the City of Tempe.

Ironman 70.3 Arizona is a part of the partnership between Ironman and Life Time Fitness that also includes the “exchange” of the Boulder Peak and Boulder Sprint triathlons. The race will offer 30 qualifying slots for the 2016 Ironman 70.3 World Championship. Registration opens on March 11 at Ironman.com.

RELATED PHOTOS: 2014 Ironman Arizona

 

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31st Running Of Ironman New Zealand Set For Saturday http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/news/31st-running-ironman-new-zealand-set-saturday_113016 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/news/31st-running-ironman-new-zealand-set-saturday_113016#comments Tue, 03 Mar 2015 20:59:31 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=113016

Kessler on the way to the win in 2014. Photo: Dell Carr

Cameron Brown, Terenzo Bozzone, Meredith Kessler and Gina Crawford highlight the Ironman New Zealand start list.

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Kessler on the way to the win in 2014. Photo: Dell Carr

This weekend, the 31st running of Ironman New Zealand will feature a pro race with returning champions and international fields. The event, which has been in the town of Taupo on New Zealand’s North Island since 1999, is known for its incredible scenery. It starts with a freshwater lake swim in Lake Taupo followed by a two-loop bike that passes through forests and a spectator-crowded three-loop run course.

The Men’s Race
Highlighting the men’s professional start list is 10-time (yes, 10) Ironman New Zealand champion and Kiwi Cam Brown. He last won the race in 2011, and, at age 42, he’s nearing the end of his career, but he’s been on the podium at this race every year for 15 years, so we might see an incredible 11th win.

His toughest competition will come from countryman and 2008 Ironman 70.3 world champ Terenzo Bozzone, who’s fresh off of an impressive win over a deep pro field at the half-iron-distance Challenge Dubai last weekend. Since Bozzone won’t have fresh legs on Saturday, it will be a good chance for other pro men to have a shot at the podium. Other top names on the start list include Kiwi Dylan McNeice, who won the iron-distance Challenge Wanaka last month and frequently records fastest swim splits; American Andrew Yoder, who’s known for his bike strength but is not an experienced long-course racer; and Nick Baldwin (SEY); James Cotter (NZL) and Joel Jameson (GBR).

RELATED PHOTOS: 2014 Ironman New Zealand

The Women’s Race
It looks like the professional women’s race will come down to a battle between two experienced long-course women: American Meredith Kessler, the three-time* defending champion, and Kiwi Gina Crawford, who’s racing on home soil and has finished second to Kessler the last two years. Like Bozzone, Kessler is traveling Down Under from the Middle East after racing Challenge Dubai. Crawford won Challenge Wanaka in February and seems to be on an upward trajectory in her Ironman career with another top-10 Kona finish in October.

*Kessler has won Ironman New Zealand the last three years, but 2012 it was shortened to a 70.3 due to weather.

RELATED PHOTOS: 2013 Ironman New Zealand

Pro men
Cameron Brown (NZL)
Terenzo Bozzone (NZL)
Joel Jameson (GBR)
Nick Baldwin (SEY)
Mike Schifferle (SUI)
Dylan McNeice (NZL)
Jose Jeuland (FRA)
Andrew Yoder (USA)
Simon Cochrane (NZL)
Todd Skipworth (AUS)
Johan Borg (AUS)
James Bowstead (NZL)
James Cotter (NZL)
Luke Martin (AUS)
Daiki Masuda (JPN)
Graham O’Grady (NZL)
Yong Hwan Oh (KOR)
Carl Read (NZL)
Alex Reithmeier (AUS)
Chris Sanson (NZL)
Shanon Stallard (NZL)
Ricky Swindale (AUS)
Marcus Hultgren (SWE)

Pro women
Meredith Kessler (USA)
Gina Crawford (NZL)
Melanie Burke (NZL)
Mareen Hufe (GER)
Stephanie Jones (USA)
Conny Dauben (GER)
Erin Furness (NZL)
Jocelyn McCauley (USA)

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A Plant-Based Cookbook That Caters To Athletes http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/nutrition/plant-based-cookbook-caters-athletes_113007 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/nutrition/plant-based-cookbook-caters-athletes_113007#comments Tue, 03 Mar 2015 20:31:36 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=113007

Thrive Energy Cookbook is a collection of 150 plant-based recipes, all designed to provide easy-to-digest energy to fuel your athletic

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The most recent release from former pro triathlete and vegan Brendan Brazier, Thrive Energy Cookbook ($23, Thriveenergycookbook.com) is a collection of 150 plant-based recipes, all designed to provide easy-to-digest energy to fuel your athletic goals. The meals are categorized as transitional (for those who are new to following a plant-based diet), gluten-free, protein-rich, raw and super nutrient dense (based on the ratio of calories to nutrients). The recipes, which range from smoothies and soups to burgers and noodle bowls, are creative and flavorful, and many feature a slant toward Asian flavors, such as curry and miso. While the ingredient lists are typically long for the more hearty meals—and may require you to buy ingredients from specialty markets—the directions are all simple enough for any home chef to follow. There is also a collection of athlete-focused recipes for pre-, during or post-workout fueling. And if the tasty recipes aren’t enticing enough to get you to try a vegan diet, the stunning food photography featured throughout will definitely do the trick. Try this vegetable-packed rice bowl recipe from the cookbook and see for yourself.

RELATED: 4 Plant-Based Endurance Nutrition Options

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One-Hour Workout: Power-Based Steady State Trainer Session http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/training/one-hour-workout-power-based-steady-state-trainer-session_113011 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/training/one-hour-workout-power-based-steady-state-trainer-session_113011#comments Tue, 03 Mar 2015 20:22:14 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=113011

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Stuck indoors? Try this training session from coach Andrew Shanks.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

Every Tuesday we’ll feature a different coach’s workout you can complete in 60 minutes (or less!).

This week’s workout comes from Andrew Shanks, a coach for Dynamo Multisport based in Atlanta, Ga. He uses this set as part of a steady-state training buildup. He suggests using power numbers as your first choice, otherwise you can use heart rate or perceived exertion as a measure of effort. Percentages are based on FTP/Lactate Threshold Heart Rate, etc.

Warm-up:
10 min fairly easy, building towards Zone 2
3×30 sec high cadence, 30 sec soft pedal recovery
3 min Zone 2
2 min Zone 3
2 min easy
= 20 min total

RELATED: Make Peace With Your Bike Trainer

Main Set:
[Do this four times through]
3 min at 80–85% power/85–90% HR
2 min at 95–100% power/95–100% HR
3 min at 50% power/easy effort, HR should get back to Zone 2
2 min at 60% power/HR should be steady Zone 2

Cool-down:
Take a few extra minutes to spin easy here if/as needed

More one-hour workouts.

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2015 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide On Newsstands Now http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/news/2015-triathlete-buyers-guide-newsstands-now_112987 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/03/news/2015-triathlete-buyers-guide-newsstands-now_112987#comments Tue, 03 Mar 2015 13:12:09 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=112987

Our 2015 guide features reviews of 184 different triathlon-related products in more than 20 categories.

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Looking to get some new gear for the 2015 triathlon season? Look no farther than the 2015 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide, which features reviews of 184 different triathlon-related products in more than 20 categories.

Some of the categories included are triathlon bikes, run shoes, wetsuits, wheels, cycling shoes, goggles, power meters and aerobars. Also included in the issue is female-specific triathlon training and racing gear, off-road gear and swim, bike and run accessories. Collected specifically for triathlon newbies, you’ll also find the essentials a beginner needs for swim, bike, run and transition to easily and comfortably get through a first race.

Among the expert reviewers are a swim coach, a bike fitter, an Ultraman finisher and multiple Ironman athletes. If you want to find a piece of tri gear expertly reviewed and that will fit your budget, the Buyer’s Guide is your resource.

Buy the digital version now.

Enter to win the bike on the cover!

 

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