Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com Triathlon Training, Gear, Nutrition, Photos, Race Results & Calendars Mon, 01 Sep 2014 01:39:52 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.5.2 Photos: Alistair Brownlee Breaks Away In Edmonton http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/photos/photos-alistair-brownlee-breaks-away-edmonton_105029 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/photos/photos-alistair-brownlee-breaks-away-edmonton_105029#comments Mon, 01 Sep 2014 00:56:52 +0000 Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=105029

Alistair Brownlee took the overall win, while Javier Gomez finished third to claim another world title. Photo: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image

Javier Gomez was crowned 2014 ITU World Champion.

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Alistair Brownlee took the overall win, while Javier Gomez finished third to claim another world title. Photo: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image

Photos: Paul Phillips/Leslie Knibb/Competitive Image

Great Britain’s Alistair Brownlee broke away with two other athletes near the end of the 40K bike ride to establish a minute-plus lead over the other main contenders to start the run. The gap was more than enough for the 2012 Olympic gold medalist as he crossed the finish line in first at 1:48:44. Spain’s Mario Mola and Javier Gomez battled through the final miles of the run, with Mola coming out on top to earn the runner-up spot in the race and on the overall world championship podium. Gomez finished third, securing his fourth ITU world championship title. Jonathan Brownlee (GBR) was the fourth finisher across the line, earning the final spot on the overall podium. Jarrod Shoemaker was the top-finishing American in seventh. Complete results.

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ITU Announces Inductees For Inaugural Hall Of Fame http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/news/itu-announces-inductees-inaugural-hall-fame_105044 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/news/itu-announces-inductees-inaugural-hall-fame_105044#comments Mon, 01 Sep 2014 00:44:42 +0000 Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=105044

As a part of its 25th year anniversary celebrations, the International Triathlon Union (ITU) today inducted seven individuals into its

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As a part of its 25th year anniversary celebrations, the International Triathlon Union (ITU) today inducted seven individuals into its inaugural Hall of Fame on the penultimate evening of the 2014 TransCanada Corp. Grand Final Edmonton.

Read the announcement from the ITU below:

“It is a great privilege to induct these nominees into the first Hall of Fame,” said ITU President and IOC Member Marisol Casado. “They set a standard of excellence from the very beginning that was crucial to the development of both triathlon and ITU. Without them, we would not enjoy the global level of exposure and Olympic standard of competition that we have today.”

Following a day of elite racing in which two World Champions were named, the below were inducted into the Hall of Fame:

Elite Women
Erin Baker (NZL) - ITU World Champion (1989), 3 x ITU World Cup wins
Karen Smyers (USA) - 2 x ITU World Champion (1990, 1995), ITU Long Distance World Champion (1996), 7 ITU World Cup wins, ITU World Cup Series winner (1991)
Emma Carney (AUS) -2 x ITU World Champion (1994, 1997), 19 ITU World Cup wins,  3 x ITU World Cup Series winner (1995, 1996, 1997)

Elite Men
Mark Allen (USA) - First ITU World Champion, Multiple ITU Long Distance and World Cup winner
Simon Lessing (GBR) – 4 x ITU World Champion (1992, 1995, 1996, 1998), Long-Distance Triathlon World Champion (1995), 7 x ITU World Cup wins, Olympian
Greg Welch (AUS) -ITU World Champion (1990). ITU World Cup Series winner (1991), ITU Duathlon World Champion (1993), ITU World Long Distance Champion (1996)

Lifetime Achievement
Les McDonald (CAN) - ITU President (1989-2008), Triathlon Canada President (1984-1996),
Largely credited with adding triathlon to the Olympic Games.

The inductees were narrowed down from a shortlist of 25 individuals in the categories of elite female and male athlete accomplishments, as well as lifetime achievements. Those nominated for the men’s and women’s categories were selected based on the criteria that each has a championship title in one or more ITU World Championships, Olympic Games, Paralympic Games, World Cup Series, and/or ITU World Rankings.

Lifetime Achievement Nominees were selected based on their extraordinary, long-term contributions off the field of play or through an exceptional contribution to ITU and the sport of triathlon.

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Alistair Brownlee Wins Edmonton, Javier Gomez World Champion http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/news/alistair-brownlee-wins-edmonton-javier-gomez-world-champion_105023 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/news/alistair-brownlee-wins-edmonton-javier-gomez-world-champion_105023#comments Sun, 31 Aug 2014 20:14:37 +0000 Bethany Mavis http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=105023

Alistair Brownlee took the overall win, while Javier Gomez finished third to claim another world title. Photo: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image

Alistair Brownlee wins the Grand Final race, while Javier Gomez finishes third to earn the ITU World Championship title.

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Alistair Brownlee took the overall win, while Javier Gomez finished third to claim another world title. Photo: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image

Great Britain’s Alistair Brownlee showed his tactical strength to break away on the bike then hang on for the 10K run to win the ITU WTS Grand Final Edmonton, his fourth Grand Final victory. Spain’s Javier Gomez, ranked No.1 in the world going into the race, was crowned ITU world champion for the fourth time with his third-place finish. Fellow Spaniard Mario Mola finished second in the Grand Final as well as silver in the world, while former world champion Jonathan Brownlee finished the season with the bronze after his fourth-place Grand Final finish.

Richard Varga (SVK) led out of the two-lap swim with Alistair in third, Gomez swimming in the top 10 and Jonathan swimming just a few seconds back. Alistair lost his goggles and swim cap during the swim, but still held onto his position. Once on the bike, Alistair quickly shot to the front of the lead pack of 21 men, which had all the top contenders—Mola, Jonny Brownlee and Gomez. Alistair tried to break away multiple times, but he didn’t have success until the fifth lap. “I went in with a plan really to try and distance Jonny from Javier if possible, to give him a shot at winning the world title,” Alistair said after the race. “That didn’t work out the first couple of laps, so then I just had to go it myself, and get that little breakaway and I got very lucky to get that gap.”

The chase pack had pulled within about 10 seconds from the back of the lead group by the end of the fourth lap, right as Alistair, Reinaldo Colucci (BRA) and Kristian Blummenfelt (NOR) were pulling away. During that fifth 5.3K lap, the breakaway group built an incredible 58-second lead over the rest of the field, and 1:26 by the time they started the run.

Many expected the race to come down to the a showdown on the run between the Brownlee brothers, Gomez and Mola for the Grand Final victory, but it turned into the 2012 Olympic champion pretty much having the race in the bag by the start of the 10K run, and the question was who would take the world champion crown. Out of T2, Gomez, Mola and Jonny Brownlee stuck to each others’ shoulders and remained that way through the first three of four laps. Jonny Brownlee was dropped on the bell lap, and while Mola and Gomez gained on Alistair, he still won by a 20-second margin in a time of 1:48:44. Mola finished second, Gomez third and Jonny fourth—all within 38 seconds of each other.

Gomez, the 2012 Olympic silver medalist, has won four WTS races this season (Auckland, Cape Town, Yokohama and Chicago), but last weekend DNF’ed in Stockholm because of a stomach bug. That made the battle for the overall series much closer between him and Jonny, so his primary goal today was staying ahead of Jonny. “The bike was very tactical—different than other races,” Gomez said. “There were two races, you know, for the title and for the race. And when Alistair broke away, I knew this was not my war this time—I had to control Jonathan, and that’s what I did.” Gomez has raced every WTS race this season, and will be racing at the Ironman 70.3 World Championship next weekend in Mont-Tremblant, Quebec, Canada.

Alistair, the 2012 Olympic gold medalist, was battling injury the early part of the season, so going into the race, he was ranked sixth in the overall series. “It would have been great to be in the running for the world series, but I wasn’t, and I made the most of it I think,” Alistair said. He’s starting to show signs of his previous unstoppable form since June, when he won the WTS race in Hamburg, then followed it up with a Commonwealth Games gold medal in July and a runner-up finish in Stockholm last weekend. “Hopefully if I can have a good winter, I’ll be at my best for next year,” he said.

U.S. fans were also excited to see both Americans finish in the top 20—Jarrod Shoemaker ran his way to a seventh-place finish, his best WTS finish since 2010, and Joe Maloy finish in 17th place. “It’s been a good year,” Shoemaker said. “It hasn’t looked good, but it’s been a nice slow build. Neal [Henderson, his coach] and I knew that if we kept working, I was going to get where I needed to get, and I’m super happy.” Shoemaker’s wife and fellow pro triathlete, Alicia Kaye, placed second at the Hy-Vee Elite Cup today, which has the largest prize purse in Olympic-distance racing. “It’s a good day for my family,” Shoemaker said.

2014 ITU World Triathlon Series Edmonton
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada – Aug. 31, 2014
1.5K swim, 40K bike, 10K run

Men
1. Alistair Brownlee (ESP) 1:48:44
2. Mario Mola (ESP) 1:49:04
3. Javier Gomez (ESP) 1:49:07
4. Jonathan Brownlee (GBR) 1:49:22
5. Joao Pereira (POR) 1:49:44
6. Crisanto Grajales (MEX) 1:49:48
7. Jarrod Shoemaker (USA) 1:49:50
8. Joao Silva (POR) 1:49:55
9. Dmitry Polyanskiy (RUS) 1:50:19
10. Reinaldo Colucci (BRA) 1:50:29

Complete results.

Final 2014 Threadneedle ITU World Triathlon Series Rankings

1. Javier Gomez Noya (ESP) 4860
2. Mario Mola (ESP) 4601
3. Jonathan Brownlee (GBR) 4501
4. Alistair Brownlee (GBR) 4006
5. Joao Pereira (POR) 3817
6. Vincent Luis (FRA) 3148
7. Dmitry Polyanskiy (RUS) 3041
8. Richard Murray (RSA) 2911
9. Ryan Bailie (AUS) 2165
10. Aaron Royle (AUS) 2064

Complete rankings.

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Photos: Gwen Jorgensen Crowned World Champion In Edmonton http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/photos/photos-gwen-jorgensen-dominates-edmonton_104993 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/photos/photos-gwen-jorgensen-dominates-edmonton_104993#comments Sun, 31 Aug 2014 17:18:47 +0000 Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=104993

American Gwen Jorgensen ran her way to her fifth WTS victory of the season and the world championship title in Edmonton.

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Photos: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image/@Compimagephoto

American Gwen Jorgensen ran her way to her fifth WTS victory of the season and the world championship title in Edmonton. Fellow American Sarah Groff finished fourth to earn the silver spot on the world championship podium. With the win, Jorgensen becomes the fourth American female to be named ITU world champion and the first since Sheila Taormina did it in 2004. Read the complete race recap.

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Kemper, Frederiksen Earn Big Pay-Days At Hy-Vee http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/news/kemper-frederiksen-earn-big-pay-days-hy-vee_104991 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/news/kemper-frederiksen-earn-big-pay-days-hy-vee_104991#comments Sun, 31 Aug 2014 14:42:13 +0000 Liz Hichens http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=104991

The United States’ Hunter Kemper and Denmark’s Helle Frederiksen earned $100,000 paychecks in Des Moines.

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Due to recent flooding and subsequent road closures in the Des Moines area, race officials were forced to make the decision Friday to change the race course. Under the new plan, elite athletes completed the Olympic distance but with an altered four-lap bike course. All age-group athletes raced on a revised sprint-distance course.

The top field of pros (athletes must qualify to compete eat Hy-Vee) came to Des Moines to compete for their share of a $500,000 pro prize purse, the largest in Olympic-distance racing. The race paid 30 deep, with $100,000 going to first place and $500 going to 30th place. With 30 men and 30 women on the start list, that means every finisher went home with prize money.

In the end it was the United States’ Hunter Kemper and Denmark’s Helle Frederiksen taking the victories with big performances on the run.

Men’s Race
Super swimmer Josh Amberger (AUS) led the men out of the water at 15:34, with Cameron Dye (USA), Clayton Fettell (AUS), Greg Bennett (AUS), Hunter Kemper (USA) and a long string of 13 other athletes following close behind. Dye, who is a specialist at this format of racing, dominated the 40K bike course in a time of 54:40 to earn over-a-minute lead coming into T2. Behind Dye a large group came in together, making it a run race to the finish. Would the American be able to hold off the fleet of former Olympians behind him? Dye struggled to keep pace and fell back, as American Hunter Kemper shined. The 38-year-old, four-time Olympian posted the second-fastest run split of the day (30:56) to propel himself to the front of the race. He crossed the finish line at 1:44:43 to take the win and the $100,000 paycheck. Switzerland’s Ruedi Wild had a solid all-around day to finish second at 1:45:01. Australia’s Brad Kahlefeldt made it an Olympian sweep on the podium, claiming third at 1:45:16.

Women’s Race
American Sara McLarty was first out of the water (16:07) with Frederiksen (16:17) and American Lauren Brandon (16:19) following close behind. Long course stars Mirinda Carfrae (AUS) and Melissa Hauschildt (AUS) had high hopes coming into this race despite some long training in their legs, but slow swims (Carfrae at 18:01 and Hauschildt at 19:30) made it difficult for them to be in contention.

Alicia Kaye (USA) came out of the water one-minute down, but quickly used her strong cycling skills to turn in the fastest bike split of the women (59:54) and find the front. Kaye, Frederiksen and 2010 Ironman 70.3 world champion Jodie Swallow (GBR) led the women into T2. Frederiksen followed her strong swim and bike with the fastest 10K of the women (35:08) to take the win in convincing fashion at 1:54:44. Kaye followed at 1:55:52, with Swallow rounding out the podium in 1:56:09.

Hy-Vee 5150 Elite Cup
Aug. 31, 2014 – Des Moines, Iowa
1.5K swim, 40K bike, 10K run

Men
1. Hunter Kemper (USA) 1:44:43
2. Ruedi Wild (SUI) 1:45:01
3. Brad Kahlefeldt (AUS) 1:45:16
4. Matt Chrabot (USA) 1:45:35
5. Kevin Collington (USA) 1:45: 40
6. Kaleb VanOrt (USA) 1:45:52
7. Greg Bennett (AUS) 1:46:00
8. Ben Collins (USA) 1:46:08
9. Rodolphe Von Berg (ITA) 1:46:15
10. James Seear (AUS) 1:46:32

Complete results.

Women
1. Helle Frederiksen (DEN) 1:54:44
2. Alicia Kaye (USA) 1:55:52
3. Jodie Swallow (GBR) 1:56:09
4. Lauren Goss (USA) 1:58:09
5. Melissa Hauschildt (AUS) 1:58:58
6. Jennifer Spieldenner (USA) 1:59:40
7. Radka Vodickova (CZE) 2:00:00
8. Laura Bennett (USA) 2:00:09
9. Mary Beth Ellis (USA) 2:00:31
10. Svenja Bazlen (GER) 2:00:48

Complete results.

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Gwen Jorgensen Wins Grand Final And World Championship http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/news/gwen-jorgensen-wins-grand-final-world-championship_104966 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/news/gwen-jorgensen-wins-grand-final-world-championship_104966#comments Sat, 30 Aug 2014 20:17:40 +0000 Bethany Mavis http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=104966

Gwen Jorgensen earns the world title. Photo: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image/@Compimagephoto

American Gwen Jorgensen runs her way to her fifth WTS victory of the season and the world championship title in Edmonton.

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Gwen Jorgensen earns the world title. Photo: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image/@Compimagephoto

American Gwen Jorgensen ran her way to her fifth WTS victory of the season and the world championship title in Edmonton. Fellow American Sarah Groff finished fourth to earn the silver spot on the world championship podium. With the win, Jorgensen becomes the fourth American female to be named ITU world champion and the first since Sheila Taormina did it in 2004.

Thanks to winning four consecutive WTS races this season, American Gwen Jorgensen only needed to place 16th or higher in order to be named the ITU world champion, but she ended up running her way into first place on the 10K run for her eighth WTS title and first world championship crown. “I knew I only had to get top 16 to be world champion,” Jorgensen said. “I really wanted to win it on this day, and it’s been the sole focus all year.”

The world title is the perfect end to Jorgensen’s record-breaking 2014 season, in which she earned five WTS titles—she’s the only woman in WTS history to win five events, and she ties the record with Olympic gold medalist Alistair Brownlee of Great Britain, who won five series events in 2009.

Fellow American Sarah Groff finished the race in fourth place and the runner-up in the world, and Kiwi Andrea Hewitt pushed the pace all day and wound up in second place in the Grand Final and third in the world.

The race started in sunny and slightly windy conditions in Hawrelak Park near downtown Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Out of the two-lap swim, Carolina Routier (ESP), Margit Vanek (HUN), Hewitt and Rebecca Clarke (NZL) were first into T1, and Jorgensen and fellow American Katie Hursey made the lead pack on the bike. Jorgensen was only 18 seconds down, behind American Sarah Haskins, coming out of the water but couldn’t stick with the leaders and was in the chase pack, along with Jodie Stimpson (GBR).

In the lead pack on the bike were 18 women, with Kiwis Hewitt, Nicky Samuels and Kate McIlroy pushing the pace, along with Great Britain’s Lucy Hall. The bike course took athletes on two large loops followed by four small loops. Jorgensen struggled at the start of the bike and kept losing time to the leaders—she and the chase pack were 28 seconds off the lead after the first lap, then 40 seconds after the second, and 1:10 after the third. For the final three laps on the bike, however, 2008 U.S. Olympian Haskins—known for her strong swim-bike combo—took the lead in the chase pack, keeping Jorgensen’s deficit to only 68 seconds out of T2.

Hewitt, Groff and Samuels pulled out in front early into the four-lap, 10K run, but Jorgensen started gaining time immediately. She started picking women off and moved into the lead at the start of the fourth lap. ““I tried to get everyone working—well the group tried to work, but you know how it is on the bike,” Hewitt said. “We had just over one minute I think heading onto the run, so we tried our hardest, we went out hard on the run, but [Jorgensen] just kept creeping up, and on that last lap she came past.”

Jorgensen used a 33:24 10K to take the victory and gold in the series, while Hewitt held on for second and the bronze medal overall, and Samuels earned third. Groff fell off the pace during the second lap and finished fourth but with the silver position in the series.

“I think I made the race difficult for myself in the beginning but I was really happy with the finish,” Jorgensen said after the race. “I was very grateful Sarah Haskins was working really hard in our group as was Jodie [Stimpson] and Flora Duffy, so I was really thankful for that.”

Before this year and since 2009, when the world championship title came from points accumulated in the overall series instead of just one race, Groff had been the only American to ever finish on the podium in the overall series, which she did with a bronze in 2011. “Honestly it was just a struggle to stay on the podium for the series for me,” Groff said. “I had to fight the entire day. … Sometimes you’ve got it and sometimes you don’t, and today I had enough.”

The American 1-2 finish bodes well as the U.S. looks toward the 2016 Olympics. “It is huge for the U.S.,” Jorgensen said of the 1-2 American finish. “I think it just shows so much what USA Triathlon has been doing for their athletes and I think it just shows huge dividends and I think it’s really exciting into the qualifying year and going into Rio.”

The points earned today will all go toward Olympic team selections and will help determine how many Olympics spots are allotted to each country.

Several other story lines also developed today, including speculation about why American Sarah Haskins chose to race Edmonton rather than the high-paying Hy-Vee Elite Cup this weekend. Many believe she could have been asked by USA Triathlon to play a domestique role in the Grand Final—to use her swim-bike skills to help Jorgensen earn the victory, which she did by pulling the chase group for the final three laps of the bike then dropping out during the run (Haskins has been battling an injury the second half of this season that has affected her run). The idea of a domestique is something USA Triathlon has said they would entertain for the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio, as long as it’s a tested and proven formula.

Also, Edmonton native Findlay was the only Canadian left racing in front of her home crowd after the bike—Sarah-Anne Brault dropped out after the swim, and Kirsten Sweetland dropped out during the bike. Findlay’s been battling a hip injury for more than two years, and her coach, Siri Lindley, was ecstatic to see her finish 15th with a solid 36:28 10K. Lindley won the ITU world champion crown for the U.S. on this exact course in 2001.

RELATED: “The Best Is Yet To Come” For Gwen Jorgensen

ITU World Triathlon Grand Final Edmonton
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada – Aug. 30, 2014
1.5K swim, 40K bike, 10K run

Women
1. Gwen Jorgensen USA 2:00:05
2. Andrea Hewitt NZL 2:00:21
3. Nicky Samuels NZL 2:00:31
4. Sarah Groff USA 2:01:20
5. Aileen Reid IRL 2:01:21
6. Claudia Rivas MEX 2:01:22
7. Sara Vilic AUT 2:01:24
8. Pamela Oliveira BRA 2:01:26
9. Katie Hursey USA 2:01:27
10. Rachel Klamer NED 2:01:30

Complete results.

Final 2014 Threadneedle ITU World Triathlon Series Rankings
1. Gwen Jorgensen USA 5085
2. Sarah Groff USA 3987
3. Andrea Hewitt NZL 3845
4. Jodie Stimpson GBR 3453
5. Nicky Samuels NZL 3073
6. Helen Jenkins GBR 2903
7. Emma Jackson AUS 2647
8. Aileen Reid IRL 2543
9. Kirsten Sweetland CAN 2540
10. Alice Betto ITA 2518

Complete rankings.

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Can You Be Too Much Of A Triathlon Perfectionist? http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/training/can-you-be-too-much-of-a-triathlon-perfectionist_84376 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/training/can-you-be-too-much-of-a-triathlon-perfectionist_84376#comments Fri, 29 Aug 2014 18:25:55 +0000 Mimi Winsberg http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=84376

Photo: Janos Schmidt/Triathlon.org

Come race day, letting go of preconceived notions of success can be helpful.

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Photo: Janos Schmidt/Triathlon.org

Perfectionists have many positive qualities that transfer well to triathlon—they set very high standards, strive for excellence and pay close attention to detail. But as athletes, they are often too hard on themselves. Psychologists have argued that perfectionists can be divided into two groups: those who use their perfectionism adaptively, and those who become self-defeating in their quest for the ideal.

Top athletes will prepare rigorously and exhibit attention to detail prior to competition. But come race day, letting go of preconceived notions of success can be helpful. Competition requires embracing uncertainty and taking some risk, and in order to win, we must be willing to lose.

Researchers have outlined the difference in strategy among athletes who are playing to win versus those who are playing not to lose. When athletes are racing to win or to achieve a personal best, they exhibit an intensification of effort and a willingness to take risks, whereas athletes who are racing not to lose will be conservative in their efforts and try to avoid mistakes.

In order to reach our athletic potential, we need to be willing to frame racing as a challenge, not a threat. Winning and losing in all of their forms become a vehicle for personal improvement.

RELATED – Confessions Of An Age Grouper: Wag Your Tail

An unhealthy perfectionist with high expectations and a harsh internal judge is likely to be less success-oriented and more failure-avoidant. On race day, he will feel more anxious and less energetic. He will be focused on avoiding mistakes rather than going for it.

Reframing racing as a challenge in which you are not expected to be perfect frees you to take risks and access the brain regions that are associated with reward. In this mode, racers are able to get in a state of flow and be more automatic in their decision making and energized in their efforts. With a growth mind-set, there is everything to gain and nothing to lose.

Use the post-race debriefing process to learn from mistakes rather than judge yourself harshly. Don’t fixate on mistakes and compare yourself negatively to others—grow from your mistakes and embrace the challenge of future races.

More “Dear Coach” articles from Triathlete magazine.

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Quick Set Friday: Short Sprints And Pulls http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/training/quick-set-friday-short-sprints-pulls_104961 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/training/quick-set-friday-short-sprints-pulls_104961#comments Fri, 29 Aug 2014 18:16:49 +0000 Jené Shaw http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=104961

Photo: Shutterstock.com

We’ll feature a workout every Friday so you have new ideas to take to the pool.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

Triathlete contributor and swimming all-star Sara McLarty has a blog with more than 500 creative workouts used in her Masters swim program in Clermont, Fla. We’ll feature a workout every Friday so you have new ideas to take to the pool. On her blog (Mastersswimworkoutsbysaramclarty.blogspot.com), you can pick a Monday set for a long distance focus, a Wednesday set for sprint training, or Friday for creative open water skills.

A:
400 (swim/kick by 100)
400 pull (3/5 breathing pattern by 100)
16×25 @ :30 (1 fast/1 easy, IM order)
8×125 @ 1:50 (25 sprint/100 smooth)
8×75 pull @ :55 (all strong)
8×25 @ :45 (dive in, sprint for half of the pool, swim easy to the wall)
600 swim (100 IM/100 free, repeat)
8×25 @:45 underwater kick
4×150 pull (7/5/3 breathing pattern by 50)
200 choice cool-down
*4600 total*

RELATED – Ask Coach Sara: Stopping Your Legs From Sinking

B:
400 (swim/kick by 100)
400 pull (3/5 breathing pattern by 100)
16×25 @ :40 (1 fast/1 easy)
8×125 @ 2:30 (25 sprint/100 smooth)
8×75 pull @ 1:15 (all strong)
8×25 @ :60 (dive in, sprint for half of the pool, swim easy to the wall)
400 swim with smooth, perfect technique
200 choice cool-down
*3600 total*

RELATED – Ask Coach Sara: Simulating Open Water And More

C:
400 (swim/kick by 100)
400 pull (3/5 breathing pattern by 100)
16×25 w/ :10 rest (1 fast/1 easy)
4×125 w/ :30 rest (25 sprint/100 smooth)
4×75 pull w/15 rest (all strong)
300 swim with smooth, perfect technique
100 choice cool-down
*2400 total*

More swim workouts from Sara McLarty.

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ITU World Champions To Be Crowned In Edmonton http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/race-coverage/itu-world-champions-crowned-edmonton_104954 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/race-coverage/itu-world-champions-crowned-edmonton_104954#comments Fri, 29 Aug 2014 17:55:53 +0000 Bethany Mavis http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=104954

Jonathan Brownlee (GBR), Javier Gomez (ESP), Gwen Jorgensen (USA) and Jodie Stimpson (GBR) receive Edmonton Oilers jerseys from hockey player Andrew Ference at the pre-race press conference. Photo: Delly Carr/Triathlon.org

This weekend, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, will host the always exciting ITU World Triathlon Series Grand Final.

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Jonathan Brownlee (GBR), Javier Gomez (ESP), Gwen Jorgensen (USA) and Jodie Stimpson (GBR) receive Edmonton Oilers jerseys from hockey player Andrew Ference at the pre-race press conference. Photo: Delly Carr/Triathlon.org

This weekend, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, will host the always exciting ITU World Triathlon Series Grand Final, the last event in the extremely competitive eight-race series. The draft-legal format features the speediest short-course athletes in the world battling it out on a multi-loop course in Hawrelak Park for the world champion title. Athletes have accumulated points throughout the season, and the ITU world champion will be determined based on an athlete’s five best finishes. The world championships format changed to a multi-race series from a single-day championship in 2009, so the winner of the Grand Final this weekend won’t necessarily be the world champion.

Elite Women

Going into the race U.S. Olympians Gwen Jorgensen and Sarah Groff are ranked first and second, respectively, in the women’s WTS rankings, and since the multi-race series change in 2009, Groff is the only woman to have ever earned a spot on the overall series podium with third in 2011. Jorgensen earned her 3,885 points with an incredible four consecutive series victories. By winning back-to-back races in Yokohama, London, Chicago and Hamburg, Jorgensen is the only athlete—male or female—to have ever won that many consecutive races in the series. Groff, who finished in fourth in the 2012 London Olympics, just moved into second place last weekend with her first WTS win in Stockholm. Her four top-five finishes on the WTS circuit earned her 3,037 points, which means Jorgensen will have to finish 16th or higher to keep Groff from earning the world champion title. Ranked third in the standings is Great Britain’s Jodie Stimpson, who won the gold medal at last month’s Commonwealth Games, with 2,982 points.

Other top women competing including Andrea Hewitt (NZL), a consistent top performer; Kirsten Sweetland (CAN); Emma Jackson (AUS) and Nicky Samuels (NZL). The other U.S. women racing are Lindsey Jerdonek, who finished a personal-best fifth place in Stockholm, Katie Hursey, Kaitlin Donner and 2008 Olympian Sarah Haskins.

Either way, a new women’s world champion will be named—the four women who’ve earned the title since the change to the multi-race format (Australia’s Emma Moffatt, Sweden’s Lisa Norden, and Great Britain’s Non Stanford and Helen Jenkins) are not on the start list for Edmonton.

RELATED: “The Best Is Yet To Come” For Gwen Jorgensen

Elite Men

On the men’s side, Spain’s Javier Gomez Noya leads the men’s rankings with 3,833 points. The 2012 Olympic silver medalist and three-time (and reigning) ITU world champion has won four races this year, in Auckland, Cape Town, Yokohama and Chicago. Hot on his heels in second is Great Britain’s Jonathan Brownlee, the 2012 Olympic bronze medalist and 2012 ITU world champion, with 3,551 points from his victory in Stockholm and podium finishes in Auckland, Cape Town and Hamburg. With such a narrow margin between first and second, the title will come down to this race—Brownlee must win and Gomez finish fifth or worse for the Brit to regain the world title. Spain’s Mario Mola is ranked third with 3,491 points, thanks to his London win and Yokohama and Chicago podium finishes.

An X factor racing this weekend is 2012 Olympic gold medalist Alistair Brownlee of Great Britain, who’s started to return to form after battling injury early in the season—he won the WTS race in Hamburg, was the runner-up in Stockholm and won the 2014 Commonwealth Games in July. There’s a possibility that he could win the race or help his brother in regaining the title. Joao Pereira (POR), Sven Reiderer (SUI) and Richard Murray (RSA) also have strong chances for the podium in Edmonton. Racing in the elite men’s race for the U.S. are Joe Maloy and Jarrod Shoemaker.

RELATED PHOTOS: Jonathan Brownlee Vs. Javier Gomez

How And When To Watch

The elite women’s race is scheduled for noon MT (2 p.m. ET) on Saturday, and the elite men’s race is the same time on Sunday. The main venue is Hawrelak Park, 15 minutes from Edmonton’s downtown core. The park is located in the heart of Edmonton’s expansive river valley. The swim will take place in Hawrelak Park Lake, while the bike and run courses take athletes through the scenic locations within the river valley. A live webcast of both races will be available from ITU at Triathlonlive.tv. The race will also be televised live on Universal Sports.

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Ask A Mechanic: Wrapping Aero Bars http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/gear-tech/ask-mechanic-wrapping-aero-bars_104951 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/gear-tech/ask-mechanic-wrapping-aero-bars_104951#comments Fri, 29 Aug 2014 16:51:26 +0000 Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=104951

Learn how to wrap your aero bars in this "Ask a Mechanic" video from Velonews.com and Art's Cyclery.

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Learn how to wrap your aero bars in this “Ask a Mechanic” video from Velonews.com and Art’s Cyclery.

More “Ask a Mechanic” videos.

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Treating And Preventing Painful Hernias http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/training/treating-preventing-painful-hernias_104948 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/training/treating-preventing-painful-hernias_104948#comments Fri, 29 Aug 2014 16:42:54 +0000 Jordan D. Metzl, M.D. http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=104948

Photo: iStock

A strong core is the best prevention for a painful hernia.

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Photo: iStock

A strong core is the best prevention for a painful hernia.

The Symptoms

Pain in the lower abdomen (a general hernia) or groin (a sportsman’s hernia) that worsens with coughing or sneezing. Sometimes pain that appears to be muscular persists for months and turns out to be from a hernia.

What’s Going On In There?

A hernia is a tear or weakness
 in the abdominal wall that allows the intestines or another organ 
to get pinched in the gap or push outside the abdomen, usually (but not always) causing pain. A general hernia is usually located in the lower abdomen at hip level. The most common kind of hernia, the inguinal hernia, involves the inguinal canal, which runs through the front wall
 of the abdomen and channels blood and lymph vessels, nerves, the spermatic cord in men, and the round ligament in women from inside the body to closer to the surface. Sections of the intestine or other abdominal organs can poke through at various places along the abdominal wall at the front of the canal, as well as around the inguinal rings at the entrance and exit of the canal.

A sportsman’s, or sports hernia, which is named that because it’s more common in athletes, occurs lower, near the groin. It’s unlike 
a general hernia because it rarely involves protruding organs. It’s a tearing of abdominal muscle, tendon and/or fascia where it attaches to the pubic bone in the lower pelvis. Your adductors attach here as well, and if they are stronger than the abdominal muscles—as they often are if you under-train your core—they can pull down on the pubic bone, causing the tear. A sports hernia is often mistaken for a chronic groin strain.

As for a general hernia, it’s possible to confuse a hernia with an abdominal strain. If you have pain, try this test: Bear down as if you’re having a bowel movement and feel the area where it hurts. Sometimes you can feel a subtle, soft protrusion where the intestine has poked through the abdominal wall. Another signal? Abs strains get better. Hernias don’t—unless you have surgery.

RELATED: 7 Steps To An Injury-Free Season

Fix It

Let the pros handle it. Hernias need surgical repair. If you ignore it, you could face serious complications.

Prevent It

Up your core work. A strong core is the best prevention for a hernia. In fact, there’s no better reason to stay in shape—they’re most often caused by weak abs and being overweight. Planks, crunches and leg raises should be workout staples. Also, I recommend taking a Pilates class a couple times a week.

When To Call A Doctor

As soon as you suspect a hernia. This is also why doctors check for hernias during physicals. If you ignore it, you could have complications:

Strangulation. The tissue that protruded outside the abdominal wall is pinched where it emerges and loses its blood supply. The tissue dies. Then it can turn gangrenous.

Testicular damage. The spermatic cord runs through the inguinal canal, so inguinal hernias can affect the testicles. Some inguinal hernias cause scrotal swelling.

Bowel dysfunction and/or obstruction. If enough of the bowel herniates, you could have intestinal cramping and vomiting. If the bowel is completely obstructed by the pinching, your bowel movements and flatulence will stop.

RELATED: The Injury-Prevention Diet

Do You Need Surgery?

Yes. Both general and sports hernias require surgery. They are not complicated procedures and athletes usually have a full recovery.

More Med Tent from Dr. Jordan Metzl.

New York City sports medicine specialist Jordan D. Metzl, M.D. is a 29-time marathon finisher and 10-time Ironman. His book, The Athlete’s Book of Home Remedies, has more than 1,000 tips to fix all types of injuries and medical conditions.

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Strong Pro Field To Race Hy-Vee Elite Cup http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/news/strong-pro-field-race-hy-vee-elite-cup_104894 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/news/strong-pro-field-race-hy-vee-elite-cup_104894#comments Fri, 29 Aug 2014 12:00:22 +0000 Bethany Mavis http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=104894

Photo: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image/@Compimagephoto

The pros will be competing for their share of a $500,000 pro prize purse this Sunday in Des Moines, Iowa.

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Photo: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image/@Compimagephoto

The start list for the Hy-Vee 5150 U.S. Championship Elite Cup has been released, and it features some speedy short- and long-course stars. The pros will be competing for their share of a $500,000 pro prize purse, the largest in Olympic-distance racing, this Sunday, Aug. 31 in Des Moines, Iowa. The race pays 30 deep, with $100,000 going to first place and $500 going to 30th place. With 30 men and 30 women on the start list, that means every finisher will go home with some prize money.

Men’s Race
The start list isn’t as deep as in previous years because the ITU World Triathlon Series Grand Final is taking place the same weekend in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, which means Spain’s Javier Gomez won’t be returning to defend his title.

Topping the men’s list is Swiss ITU athlete Ruedi Wild, who has excelled at non-drafting races this season with victories at St. Anthony’s and 5150 Zurich, and podium finishes at three half-Ironman races (St. Croix, Rapperswil and Weisbaden). He’ll face tough competition from multiple Life Time Series champion Cameron Dye (USA); current Life Time Tri Series leader Ben Collins (USA); former Hy-Vee champion and triathlon veteran Greg Bennett (AUS); two-time Olympic medalist Bevan Docherty (NZL); and Brad Kahlefeldt (AUS), who was the runner-up at 70.3 St. Croix and St. Anthony’s this season. Other top names competing for the $100,000 are Kevin Collington (USA), Paul Matthews (AUS), Hunter Kemper (USA), Matt Chrabot (USA), Clayton Fettell (AUS), James Seear (AUS), Kaleb VanOrt (USA), Ivan Rana (ESP), Matt Reed (USA) and Tom Davison (NZL).

RELATED PHOTOS: 2013 Hy-Vee Elite Cup

Women’s Race
Like Gomez, defending women’s champion Emma Moffatt (AUS) will not be on the start list. Two-time Ironman world champion Mirinda Carfrae (AUS) and two-time Ironman 70.3 world champion Melissa Hauschildt (AUS) aren’t known for their strength at this distance, but that doesn’t mean each isn’t capable of taking the win. Carfrae finished second in 2011, while Hauschildt had the same result last year. They’re each capable of posting race-best run times, but will need to keep pace on the swim and bike to have a chance.

The deep field also includes Life Time Tri Series champ Alicia Kaye (USA), Olympian and 70.3 St. Croix champ Radka Vodickova (CZE), 2013 Kona podium finisher Liz Blatchford (GBR), Boulder Peak 5150 and 70.3 San Juan champion Helle Frederiksen (DEN), 2010 Ironman 70.3 world champion Jodie Swallow and uber biker Svenja Bazlen (GER). Other top American women on the start list include Laura Bennett, Kelly Williamson, Sara McLarty, Mary Beth Ellis, Rebeccah Wassner, Laurel Wassner and Jillian Petersen.

RELATED PHOTOS: 2012 Hy-Vee Elite Cup

Men’s Start List
1 Ruedi Wild SUI
2 Hunter Kemper USA
3 Kevin Collington USA
4 James Seear AUS
5 Paul Matthews AUS
6 Greg Bennett AUS
7 Brad Kahlefeldt AUS
8 Rodolphe Von Berg ITA
9 Antony Costes FRA
10 Cameron Dye USA
11 Matt Chrabot USA
12 Benjamin Collins USA
13 Joshua Amberger AUS
14 Wikus Weber RSA
15 Mark Bowstead NZL
16 Domenico Passuello ITA
17 Clayton Fettell AUS
18 Jordan Jones USA
19 Andreas Dreitz GER
21 Pieter Heemeryck BEL
21 David Thompson USA
22 Brooks Cowan USA
23 Kaleb VanOrt USA
24 Chris Foster USA
25 Barrett Brandon USA
26 Drew Scott USA
27 Matt Reed USA
28 Ivan Rana ESP
29 Bevan Docherty NZL
30 James Thorp USA

Women’s Start List
51 Svenja Bazlen GER
52 Lauren Goss USA
53 Alicia Kaye USA
54 Radka Vodickova CZE
55 Helle Frederiksen DNK
56 Sara McLarty USA
57 Catherine Jameson GBR
58 Liz Blatchford GBR
59 Abby Geurink USA
60 Mary Beth Ellis USA
61 Rebeccah Wassner USA
62 Lauren Brandon USA
63 Ricarda Lisk GER
64 Jillian Petersen USA
65 Hallie Blunck USA
66 Laura Bennett USA
67 Laurel Wassner USA
68 Kelly Williamson USA
69 Jen Spieldenner USA
70 Liz Baugher USA
71 Mirinda Carfrae AUS
72 Sarah Crowley AUS
73 Isabelle Gagnon CAN
74 Melissa Hauschildt AUS
75 Sinead O’Dwyer USA
76 Renate Forstner DEU
77 Lesley Smith USA
78 Nell Rojas USA
79 Jodie Swallow GBR
80 Brianna Blanchard USA

More race coverage from Triathlete.com.

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Are You Tracking Qualitative Measurements? http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/training/recovery-qualitative-measurement_11968 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/training/recovery-qualitative-measurement_11968#comments Thu, 28 Aug 2014 20:00:20 +0000 Triathlete.com http://running.competitor.com/2010/08/features/recovery-qualitative-measurement_12721

Learn how tracking stressors and noting how you’re feeling on a daily basis can help place a greater emphasis on recovery.

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Learn how tracking stressors and noting how you’re feeling on a daily basis can help place a greater emphasis on recovery.

RELATED – Dear Coach: How Should I Approach My Recovery Week?

More recovery advice.

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Try A Flexible Training Schedule http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/training/try-a-flexible-training-schedule_81192 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/training/try-a-flexible-training-schedule_81192#comments Thu, 28 Aug 2014 19:50:25 +0000 Aaron Hersh http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=81192

Get more out of your next run-focused block by following an adjustable training schedule.

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Get more out of your next run-focused block by following an adjustable training schedule.

Real life doesn’t always agree with your oh-so-detailed training plan. No matter how perfectly crafted a schedule or workout, it’s not going to be effective if your body isn’t prepared or if other commitments get in the way. But you don’t have to be a slave to a training plan to perform at your best—especially during your most challenging training weeks, such as a run-focus block.

Pro athletes who work closely with their coaches scrap advanced plans all the time. Brett Sutton—the most successful coach in Ironman history—doesn’t even write training plans for his athletes. He decides each and every workout based on how his athletes feel and what he thinks they need to do to improve. Although you may not have Sutton’s experience or intuition, almost no one knows when a workout just isn’t going to be effective better than the athlete.

Crafting an effective run-specific training block that will have you faster than ever in your goal race isn’t something most people can do on the fly, however. You still need a plan. Instead of pre-assigning your workouts to each day of the week, make a list of every training session you plan to achieve during a given week, broken into seven training days. Pick your workouts from that list every day based on your readiness to train. Maintain a little schedule flexibility to get the most out of your run block training weeks—and still enjoy them too.

RELATED – Perfect Pairings: How To Schedule Your Run Workouts

Rate Your Readiness

At the start of every day, realistically assess your ability to train based on physical recovery and real-life factors such as time, stress level and motivation. Rate yourself on a scale of one to three.

Use your readiness rating to pick your workouts as each day comes by selecting one of the potential training days from the corresponding column in the chart at the top of the page. Cross each day off your list as completed and try to finish them all by the end of the week.

Sample Training Week
Monday (2)

Feeling worn out from the weekend training.

Tuesday (4)
Refreshed, but slammed at the office.

Wednesday (5)
Meeting cancelled, have a little extra time today.

Thursday (1)
Up late last night and sore from yester- day’s long run.

Friday (7)
Meeting training partners at the track in the morning, feeling ready to compete!

Saturday (3)
Family is in town visiting, short on time.

Sunday (6)
Day is open and I’m feeling fresh. Let’s hit it!

RELATED: Stop Running Long On Sundays

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“The Best Is Yet To Come” For Gwen Jorgensen http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/olympics/best-yet-come-gwen-jorgensen_104931 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/olympics/best-yet-come-gwen-jorgensen_104931#comments Thu, 28 Aug 2014 19:37:41 +0000 Liz Hichens http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=104931

Jorgensen on her way to the win in Hamburg. Photo: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image/@Compimagephoto

Jorgensen and her coach Jamie Turner chat ahead of Saturday’s Grand Final, where she is a heavy favorite to grab her first world title.

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Jorgensen on her way to the win in Hamburg. Photo: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image/@Compimagephoto

No. 1 ranked Gwen Jorgensen and her coach Jamie Turner chat ahead of Saturday’s WTS Edmonton Grand Final, where she is a heavy favorite to grab her first world title.

American Gwen Jorgensen heads into Saturday’s ITU World Triathlon Series Grand Final in Edmonton as the heavy favorite to not only take the win, but earn the title of overall world champion based on her dominant 2014 series’ performance. Earlier this week, Jorgensen and coach Jamie Turner took time to talk to media about a variety of topics including mental preparation for the big Edmonton race, their coach/athlete relationship and her recent dominance in the WTS.

Jorgensen on which WTS win this year was the toughest.

They’re never easy, I can tell you that. I think each race this year that I’ve won has been difficult in different ways. I think the one I was happiest with was my race in either Yokohama or London. I had really good swims, was in the front bike pack and then had an excellent run as well, so it’s nice when I’m able to execute on the swim, the bike and the run.

Jorgensen on what she’s improved at the most in 2014.

Since I’ve started working with Jamie Turner we’ve been working on my swim a lot. We worked on it all last year as well, but last year my swim was a little more inconsistent, and I think this year I’ve been more consistent. That has been an improvement that I’ve been happy with.

On if Jorgensen is “redefining” the way the women race with her strong run.
Turner
That’s a compliment to Gwen. Her competitors put a lot of pressure on her as well. When Gwen’s in good shape and she’s prepared well for the race, she’s been quite dominant this season on her run performance. Races like Hamburg were certainly a challenge. They came at a phase of training that meant Gwen probably wasn’t able to turn up on race day to deliver her best performance. That’s something we hope to do in Edmonton. The best is yet to come from Gwen as we build through the year.

Jorgensen
As Jamie said, that would be a huge compliment, but when I go to race I just try to do the things that we’ve been working on and it’s not something I think about. I know if I make a mistake and give my competitors an inch then they’ll take a mile, and so I really try to execute on every discipline of the sport.

On the decision to skip WTS Stockholm last weekend.
Jorgensen
The plan all year was to skip Stockholm if I had enough points going in. The series overall counts your best five races plus the final, and I had five good enough results to not have to do Stockholm. We decided to get another week of training in and focus on Edmonton.

Turner
I might add that the demands of our sport are two-fold. One, it’s important to be able to demonstrate performance on a major benchmark event—we’ve seen a lot of athletes from Commonwealth countries have to prepare for the Commonwealth Games—so it’s all well and good if you perform well in the series, but at the end of the day the holy grail is to demonstrate performance on one day in Rio. Obviously that’s what we’re working toward now. Bypassing Stockholm gave us the opportunity to race Hamburg, have a little bit of a break and then prepare for a longer period of time for Edmonton, which is more like the preparation Gwen will need leading up to both the Olympic qualification and the Olympics upon qualification.

RELATED PHOTOS: Gwen Jorgensen Wins In Hamburg

Jorgensen on the recently-announced scholarship.
It was a joint idea between me and my fiancé Patrick. We wanted to find a way to give back to the sport and we were discussing ways of how we could do it. We talked to USA Triathlon, Jamie and some other people in the sport and thought this would be a good starting point. We’ve been overwhelmed with support from other sponsors. Right now we have $15,000 to award and it’s something we hope we can give back to the future generation of triathlon.

On the coach/athlete relationship between Jorgensen and Turner.
Jorgensen
It’s been incredible to have this performance environment, where every day I’m training with my peers that I compete against. It’s nice to have those people to compare yourself against and push yourself. Someone’s always going to be having a good day, so you’re always going to have someone there that’s going to push you to be better.

Turner
I think Gwen came on board [before the 2013 season] with some new zest. She probably had a much greater understanding of what she needed to invest in and what was required from her daily. I’ve just been a catalyst for that. I think some of Gwen’s learning opportunities come from myself, some from her experiences, but a lot of them come from the osmosis of being in an environment that’s competitive daily. It’s my job to make sure we manage that highly competitive environment and we look after individuals within the group… Gwen wouldn’t be where she is now without her support from her fantastic fiancé Pat… When you come to the sport late as Gwen has done, you really need a strong support team.

Jorgensen on mentally preparing for a big race like Saturday’s Grand Final.
I think that’s where I’m lucky that I have such a great support crew. I’ve had some experience now. I had a race in San Diego in 2012 where there was a bit more media attention around me and I don’t think I handled it very well, and that was a great learning experience for me on what I should do and what I should focus on. At the end of the day it’s just another race and it’s what I train to do. I’m really excited to go out there and race. We’ve been training really hard all year and it’s exciting to be able to go out there and show everyone what we’ve been working on.

Jorgensen on the success of USA Triathlon at last weekend’s WTS Stockholm race.
It’s incredible. Watching that race was amazing. Everyone—Sarah Groff took the win and then Lindsey Jerdonek finished fifth, that was an incredible race for her, and Katie Hursey in the top-10 as well. Then on the men’s side Ben Kanute had what I’d call a breakthrough race at the WTS level [finishing 11th]. It was incredible to watch that for team USA. I think it shows how much support, time and energy USAT has been putting into their athletes, and on trying to improve and become competitive on the world level.

Jorgensen on her plans after Edmonton.
After this I fly home to St. Paul-Minnesota. The day we arrive is eight months to the day since we’ve been home, so it will be nice to back and get some quality time with family and friends and just be home. I’m going to take some time and relax. We’re getting married on Oct. 4. I’m really excited.

RELATED: How Gwen Jorgensen’s 10K Time Stacks Up

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Recipe Of The Week: Meyer Lemon And Basil Pizza http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/nutrition/recipe-week-meyer-lemon-basil-pizza_104917 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/nutrition/recipe-week-meyer-lemon-basil-pizza_104917#comments Thu, 28 Aug 2014 18:11:01 +0000 Jessica Cerra http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=104917

Combined with fresh basil, creamy ricotta and a kick from the red onions this is sure to become a favorite fuel-up meal.

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The secret to this pizza is the homemade meyer lemon olive oil. Combined with fresh basil, creamy ricotta and a kick from the red onions this is sure to become a favorite fuel-up meal. The leftover lemon-oil is also great for salad dressings, grilling and side dishes.

Ingredients

Meyer Lemon Olive Oil
½ cup extra virgin olive oil
4 meyer lemons*
¼ teaspoon each salt and pepper
*Meyer lemons are slightly sweeter than regular lemons. If you can’t find meyer lemons use regular lemons, plus 1 teaspoon agave to add sweetness.

Pizza

1 pre-made pizza dough
2 tablespoon meyer lemon olive oil
2 tablespoon finely sliced lemon peel
8 ounces whole-milk ricotta
4 ounces fresh mozzarella, thinly sliced
1/3 cup thinly sliced red onion
1/3 cup fresh basil leaves

RELATED: Roasted Garlic Pizza With Heirloom Tomato And Arugula Salad Recipe

Preparation

Meyer Lemon Olive Oil
1. Pour the olive oil into a small pot with the salt and pepper. Use a knife to peel two of the lemons, add the peel to the pot.
2. Cut all four lemons in half and squeeze the juice from the two peeled lemons into the pot also.
3. Bring to a simmer on medium heat. Remove from the heat and let cool in the pot. Transfer the oil, lemon halves and peels to a glass jar. Seal tightly and store in a cool dry place.

Pizza
1. Roll the dough out into a circle, and use a fork to poke holes around the dough (this ensures it won’t bubble). Place on a baking sheet prepared with foil and non-stick cooking spray. Bake at 425 degrees for 10 minutes.
2. Remove from the oven and spread the olive oil onto the hot crust. Sprinkle the lemon peel over the oil.
3. Dollop the ricotta across the crust and scatter the red onion evenly over the ricotta.
4. Place the mozzarella on top and squeeze the juice from one of the lemons in the olive oil over the pizza.
5. Place back in the oven and bake another 20-30 minutes until crust cooks through and the cheese starts to turn golden brown.
6. Remove from the oven and serve with fresh basil leaves on top.

RELATED: Make Your Own Pizza

Want to try some of Jessica Cerra’s cooking in person? She’s the featured chef for our upcoming Triathlete Magazine Training Camp. Sign up here!

Jess Cerra is the owner of Fit Food by Jess, a private chef and catering company in Encinitas, Calif. Jess recently launched Harmony Bar, and all natural gluten-and soy free bar designed to tasted like a soft baked cookie. She is an ex-professional XTERRA triathlete and mountain biker, and current elite amateur road cyclist for the SPY GIANT RIDE p/b MRI Endurance team. Follow Jess’ recipes on her “Fit Food by Jess” Facebook page, as well as the “Harmony Bar” Facebook page. Also on twitter @fitfoodbyjess and @harmonybars.

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ITU Aquathlon World Champions Crowned In Edmonton http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/news/itu-aquathlon-world-champions-crowned-edmonton_104911 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/news/itu-aquathlon-world-champions-crowned-edmonton_104911#comments Thu, 28 Aug 2014 16:27:50 +0000 Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=104911

Photo: Delly Carr/Triathlon.org

New Zealand dominated the events, winning the women's elite and junior titles, as well as the men's junior division.

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Photo: Delly Carr/Triathlon.org

The first champions of the week were crowned on Wednesday at the Aquathlon World Championships, which kicked off action at the TransCanada Corp. World Triathlon Grand Final Edmonton.

New Zealand dominated the events, winning the women’s elite and junior titles, as well as the men’s junior division. Japan also enjoyed a successful day, with Yuichi Hosoda and Ryousuke Yamamoto finishing 1-2 in the men’s elite race.

Men
The USA’s Tommy Zaferes executed a swift swim on the one-lap 750m course, but his 10-second lead wasn’t enough to ward off the Japanese. Hosoda took the lead after the first of two run laps and managed to hang on to the top spot through the finish line.

“I thought this aquathlon is very, very good for swim practice for me,” Hosoda said. “This is a different kind of swimming with a diving start. It was a good running session for me. I’m looking forward to this weekend. I’m very happy.”

Teammate Ryosuke Yamamoto took off after Hosoda for silver while bronze was left for Ukraine’s Yegor Martynenko with the second-fastest run split of the day. Alessio Fioravanti (ITA) was the fastest man in the U23 category, while Kyle Smith (NZL) took top honors in the men’s junior race.

Elite men’s results
U23 men’s results
Junior men’s results 

Women
In the women’s race, it was Great Britain’s Hannah Kitchen that headed for transition first, but Anneke Jenkins(NZL) surprised the experienced aquathlon field when she sprinted past them on the two-lap run for gold. Last year’s bronze medal winner Yuliya Yelistratova (UKR) upgraded to a silver, while Kitchen took third.

“It was good, I really enjoyed,” Jenkins said. “It’s a good warmup, I had to do some hard training today. It’s good to do the swim. I got lost twice coming out of the swim, so it’s good to get those things out of the way.”

Ivana Kuriackova (UKR) won the women’s U23 division, while New Zealand’s Jaimee Leader won the women’s junior category.

Elite women’s results
U23 women’s results
Junior women’s results

Paratriathlon
In the para-aquathlon races, Hungary’s Peter Boronkay was the first athlete to cross the finish line, clenching the first world title of the World Championship events in the men’s PT4 sport class. Alejandro Sanchez Palomero (ESP) won the men’s PT3 division, while reigning triathlon World Champion Melissa Reid (GBR) added an aquathlon world championship title to her name in the women’s PT5.

PT3 Results
PT4 Results
PT5 Results 

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ITU Announces 2015 Grand Final Chicago Dates http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/news/itu-announces-2015-grand-final-chicago-dates_104906 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/news/itu-announces-2015-grand-final-chicago-dates_104906#comments Thu, 28 Aug 2014 16:20:30 +0000 Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=104906

Photo: Delly Carr/Triathlon.org

The 2015 ITU World Triathlon Series Grand Final and World Championships will take place Sept. 15-20, 2015

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Photo: Delly Carr/Triathlon.org

The International Triathlon Union, USA Triathlon and Lagardère Unlimited Events North America have announced the 2015 ITU World Triathlon Series Grand Final and World Championships will take place Sept. 15-20, 2015.

Read the news from USA Triathlon below:

New to the World Triathlon Series circuit in 2014, Chicago welcomed more than 4,000 elites, age-group triathletes and paratriathletes to a race venue based in the city’s beautiful Grant Park along the Lake Michigan shoreline, with athletes finishing at the iconic Buckingham Fountain.

In 2015, Grant Park will once again serve as the main venue for the Grand Final, featuring 150 of the top elite men and women in the sport vying for a world title. Other world championship events to be contested over five days in Chicago include age-group sprint and Olympic-distance triathlon races, paratriathlon, juniors, under-23, U23/junior mixed team relay and aquathlon. Nearly 6,000 athletes from around the globe are expected to descend on Chicago for a thrilling week of multisport.

“The 2014 World Triathlon Chicago was a great success, so we are thrilled that Chicago will return in 2015 as the Grand Final,” said Marisol Casado, ITU President and IOC Member. “The city provides great support and a phenomenal backdrop for triathlon. Together with Lagardère Unlimited Events North America and USA Triathlon, I’m sure this World Championship race will be one of our best yet.”

The 2015 ITU World Triathlon Grand Final in Chicago will mark the first time a U.S. city has hosted the Grand Final since the series was launched in 2009. It is also the first age-group world championship event to be held in the U.S. since the 2005 ITU World Championships in Honolulu, Hawaii. Chicago is the third U.S. city to host the ITU World Triathlon Series, joining Washington D.C. (2009) and San Diego (2012-13).

RELATED PHOTOS: Gwen Jorgensen Wins In Chicago

“Chicago was an exceptional host this year, and we are proud to welcome the world’s best triathletes back to the city in 2015 as they compete for world titles,” said Rob Urbach, USA Triathlon CEO. “With a sold-out field of age-group athletes as well as top-ranked elites and paratriathletes at the event in 2014, we know the 2015 event will showcase even more outstanding triathlon talent here on home soil.”

“The countdown has begun, and we are already making the necessary preparations to welcome nearly 6,000 athletes to Chicago’s Grant Park in September 2015,” said Franzi Petermann, Managing Director for ITU World Triathlon Chicago. “We are planning to make this one of the most memorable events on the ITU calendar, and we look forward to crowning world champions here in Chicago next year.”

“Chicago is an amazing destination for sporting events – sports are a huge part of our city’s culture. Working with International Federations, such as ITU, and National Governing Bodies, such as USA Triathlon, are a major focus for us, and we are proud and excited to work with these great partners, along with event partner, Lagardère Unlimited Events North America. The first Chicago event in 2014 was a huge success in our eyes,” said Kara Bachman, Executive Director of the Chicago Sports Commission, “We can’t wait to welcome back the world’s best athletes for the 2015 Grand Final.”

Festivities the week of Sept. 15-20 include a parade of nations as well as the Opening and Closing Ceremonies. A detailed schedule will be made available in early 2015. For more information, visit Chicago.triathlon.org.

RELATED PHOTOS: Javier Gomez Wins WTS Chicago

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Dispatch: Shane Niemeyer’s Path From Addict To Triathlete http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/features/dispatch-book-review-hurt-artist_104891 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/features/dispatch-book-review-hurt-artist_104891#comments Thu, 28 Aug 2014 15:48:16 +0000 Holly Bennett http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=104891

Shane Niemeyer. Photo: Competitive Image

Columnist Holly Bennett reviews the new book The Hurt Artist–My Journey From Suicidal Junkie To Ironman.

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Shane Niemeyer. Photo: Competitive Image

Columnist Holly Bennett reviews the new book The Hurt Artist–My Journey From Suicidal Junkie To Ironman.

I know Shane Niemeyer from the Boulder endurance sports circle. He’s a personal trainer at my gym, we swim in the same Masters group and we sometimes bump into one another at social functions. He’s always one to share a smile and a kind hello, and he has a quirky-sweet way of asking, “What have you been up to?” Nothing feels forced with Niemeyer; despite only knowing him slightly, I can tell he’s authentic, genuinely wanting to press pause on whatever might seem more important to connect with a friend. I can tell he’s a guy who savors life’s moments.

I knew of his difficult past, though not in detail. I remembered that his story had been highlighted in the 2010 NBC Ironman broadcast–a once suicidal drug addict turned triathlete–but I didn’t recall the full extent of what was shared on air. When his book was published I looked forward to reading it–in part, admittedly, out of curiosity for the difficult truths within. But more than wanting to know what led Niemeyer to try ending his life, I wanted to know what made him live–and thrive–after that attempt.

The Hurt Artist is hardly feel-good summer reading. It’s raw and uncomfortable and will make you squirm. It will give you pause the next time you pass someone down and out in the streets, perhaps with a newfound compassion for the person behind the pained, drug and alcohol-reddened eyes. It will turn your concept of determination upside down. And above all else, it will make you consider the question of motivation–where it comes from in your own life, whether the actions you take every day are done with purpose and direction, and whether any obstacle in the future will again feel insurmountable.

RELATED: Lionel Sanders’ Path To 70.3 Champion

Something in Niemeyer was strong enough to survive his premeditated suicide attempt, and I dare say it wasn’t his robust physique; it would be months until he began to transform into an athlete, one who would eventually qualify for the Ironman World Championship four years running. At the time, his body was ravaged from years of drug, alcohol and tobacco abuse, plus he was significantly overweight. But something in him did fight back against his deep self-loathing–something I imagine as more than simply dumb luck that his death-jump did not prove fatal. He awoke to find himself still very much alive, yet different. Every past effort to get straight, every notion that he was indeed too far gone and desperately needed help, had failed to click successfully into place–much like a bike’s chain that continually clunks along, making a bothersome noise, never truly finding traction, and ultimately wearing away to worthlessness. But when Niemeyer came to after what was meant to be his death, the chain found its cog. He was still a broken man, but now with drive and desire to heal.

The how’s of Niemeyer’s transformation–his incredible journey through the pain and desperation of addiction, the process of bettering himself both intellectually and physically in prison (imagine triathlon training in the confines of a cell block) and ultimately discovering purpose and pleasure as a personal trainer, triathlete, husband and reformed family member–are best left to the book.

But I will call out one of the book’s many moments–a single sentence, actually–that struck me. “I do think it’s possible to be both lucid and delusional simultaneously,” wrote Niemeyer. He was describing the period of intense drug withdrawal following his suicide attempt and incarceration in solitude, the time during which he happened upon an Outside magazine article featuring six-time Ironman world champion Dave Scott. It was Niemeyer’s introduction to triathlon–and an immediate, if uncommon, call-to-arms for the heretofore-floundering young man to set his sights on Kona, the first step toward reconstructing his life. To latch onto that lucidity (albeit laced with delusion–I mean what seemingly dead-end convict decides to become an Ironman?) at his lowest point, and to carve a clear path of promise out of his personal darkness, speaks to Niemeyer’s character–one that clearly belongs on a racecourse or a gym floor inspiring others, and no longer behind bars.

Learn more about Niemeyer, including where to purchase The Hurt Artist, at Trueambitions.com.

More “Dispatch” from Holly Bennett.

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BMC Reveals Futuristic Impec Concept Bike http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/photos/bmc-reveals-futuristic-impec-concept-bike_104876 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/08/photos/bmc-reveals-futuristic-impec-concept-bike_104876#comments Wed, 27 Aug 2014 21:43:20 +0000 Caley Fretz | Velonews.com http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=104876

The Impec Concept is intended to be a peek into what time trial/triathlon bikes could look like five to seven years from now.

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Concept cars are common at auto tradeshows; manufacturers are always showing some futuristic model that will never see production. But those cars are more than just fun to look at—they often hold technologies that will make it into production models.

Concept bikes are relatively rare in cycling. Bikes are modular and standardized. Components, in general, work with frames across the industry, conforming to engineering standards so that consumers aren’t stuck with a single brand. That prevents the sort of ground-up design that we associate with concept designs. Add this to the fact that most cycling brands aren’t manufacturers at all, but rather design, engineering and marketing firms that outsource production, and it’s understandable that Eurobike and Interbike see few concept designs.

This year, BMC has broken that mold as a way to celebrate the opening of its Impec Advanced R&D lab in Grenchen, Switzerland. It’s a way for the brand to show off its engineering chops and, perhaps more importantly, its in-house manufacturing abilities. The bike is simply called the Impec Concept, and its intended to be a peek into what time trial bikes could look like 5-7 years from now. It’s highly modular in design, allowing for bits to be swapped out for different courses and different riders. It throws most current UCI rules out the window. The gearbox is internal, the brakes are discs, and few features we’d normally associate with the bicycle have been left intact.

RELATED – 2014 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide: Bikes

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