Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com Triathlon Training, Gear, Nutrition, Photos, Race Results & Calendars Fri, 18 Apr 2014 20:24:29 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.5.2 Video: Iron-Distance Swim Tips From Dylan McNeice http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/training/video-iron-distance-swim-tips-dylan-mcneice_97632 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/training/video-iron-distance-swim-tips-dylan-mcneice_97632#comments Fri, 18 Apr 2014 20:24:29 +0000 Holly Bennett http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=97632

Defending Challenge Taiwan champ—and super swimmer—Dylan McNeice shares advice for tackling the first leg of a triathlon.

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Dylan McNeice, the 2013 Challenge Taiwan champion and two-time winner of Challenge Wanaka, is prepared to defend his Taiwan title against an impressive field of rivals this weekend. McNeice, known for his powerful swimming background yet also an emerging long-course talent on the bike and run, has thus far stamped his victor’s mark in lead-from-the-start style. I sat down with the odds-on favorite for a repeat victory to glean a few last minute swim tips prior to Saturday’s race.

More from Challenge Taiwan.

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Tips For Relieving Open-Water Swim Anxiety http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/training/tips-for-relieving-open-water-swim-anxiety_74940 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/training/tips-for-relieving-open-water-swim-anxiety_74940#comments Fri, 18 Apr 2014 19:08:02 +0000 Sara McLarty http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=74940

Photo: John David Becker

The answer to conquering your fear lies in your pre-race training, mental preparation, and creating and utilizing a personal race strategy.

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Photo: John David Becker

Discomfort in the open water is very common. Whether it is a panic attack in the middle of the course, fear of the “Creature from the Black Lagoon,” or simply an aversion to dark and murky water, you are not alone. Anxiety is normal among athletes at all experience levels. The answer to conquering your fear lies in your pre-race training, mental preparation, and creating and utilizing a personal race strategy.

RELATED: Three Essential Open-Water Survival Tips

Consider these strategies:

• Mimic the chaos of open water by swimming with a large group in the pool. Share a lane with other swimmers where you’ll be forced to make contact, and swim side-by-side to become more comfortable.

• Practice in open water as often as possible. Gather a group of training partners for a trip to the beach and attend any open water clinics in your area. Take advantage of every opportunity to swim in your wetsuit to get accustomed to constriction around your neck, shoulders and torso.

• Use visualization to mentally prepare. Imagine stressful situations that can occur and think about staying calm, controlling your breathing and continuing to swim forward.

• Compose a personal race-day strategy that helps you maintain confidence. Cut out all negative self-talk, use calm and deep yoga breaths when you feel anxious, familiarize yourself with the race course and positions of safety personnel, and position yourself at the back or outside of your start wave.

Even with the best preparation and practice, you might still suffer a panic attack during the race. If that happens, just move away from other swimmers, roll on your back and focus on breathing and lowering your heart rate. Resume the event if you feel confident to continue. Stop and seek medical help if you experience chest pain/discomfort, light-headedness or an unusually high heart rate.

RELATED: Fearful Of The Open Water? Try Hypnotism

Follow Triathlete on Twitter @Triathletemag for inspiration, new workout ideas, gear reviews from our editors and more.

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Dispatch: Pre-Race At 2014 Challenge Taiwan http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/photos/photos-pre-race-2014-challenge-taiwan_97610 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/photos/photos-pre-race-2014-challenge-taiwan_97610#comments Fri, 18 Apr 2014 15:24:43 +0000 Holly Bennett http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=97610

"Dispatch" columnist Holly Bennett shares images from her time in Taiwan ahead of Saturday's Challenge Taiwan triathlon.

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“Dispatch” columnist Holly Bennett shares images from her time in Taiwan ahead of Saturday’s Challenge Taiwan triathlon.

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2014 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide: Cycling Shoes http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/gear-tech/2014-triathlete-buyers-guide-cycling-shoes-2_97636 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/gear-tech/2014-triathlete-buyers-guide-cycling-shoes-2_97636#comments Fri, 18 Apr 2014 14:00:24 +0000 Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=97636

Get a look at the cycling shoes featured in the 2014 Triathlete Buyer's Guide.

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Get a look at the cycling shoes featured in the 2014 Triathlete Buyer's Guide.

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Quick Set Friday: 4x Freestyle Intervals http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/training/quick-set-friday-4x-freestyle-intervals_97624 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/training/quick-set-friday-4x-freestyle-intervals_97624#comments Fri, 18 Apr 2014 11:00:12 +0000 Jené Shaw http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=97624

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Triathlete contributor and swimming all-star Sara McLarty shares another new swim workout to take to the pool this weekend.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

Triathlete contributor and swimming all-star Sara McLarty has a blog with more than 500 creative workouts used in her Masters swim program in Clermont, Fla. We’ll feature a workout every Friday so you have new ideas to take to the pool. On her blog (Mastersswimworkoutsbysaramclarty.blogspot.com), you can pick a Monday set for a long distance focus, a Wednesday set for sprint training, or Friday for creative open water skills.

A:
200 swim/100 kick
12×25 @ :40 w/ band only
8×50 swim @ :45 (descend 1-4, 5-8)
100 easy (reverse IM drill)
(do the following sets continuous, no extra rest, all swim freestyle)
4×25 @ :30
4×50 @ :50
4×75 @ 1:10
4×100 @ 1:25
4×125 @ 1:45
4×150 @ 2:05
4×175 @ 2:20
4×200 @ 2:40
200 cool-down
*4900 total*

B:
200 swim/100 kick
8×25 @ :60 w/band only
4×50 swim @ :55 (descend 1-4)
100 easy swim
(do the following sets continuous, no extra rest, all swim freestyle)
4×25 @ :30
4×50 @ :60
4×75 @ 1:20
4×100 @ 1:50
4×125 @ 2:10
4×150 @ 2:40
4×175 @ 3:10
200 cool-down
*3800 total*

C:
200 swim/100 kick
4×25 w/ :30 rest w/band only
4×50 swim w/ :20 rest (descend 1-4)
100 easy swim
(do the following sets continuous, no extra rest, all swim freestyle)
4×25 w/ :10 rest
4×50 w/ :15 rest
4×75 w/ :20 rest
4×100 w/ :25 rest
4×125 w/ :30 rest
200 cool-down
*2400 total*

More workouts from Sara McLarty.

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When To Run Twice In One Day http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/training/seeing-double_53517 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/training/seeing-double_53517#comments Fri, 18 Apr 2014 10:09:33 +0000 Jené Shaw http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=53517

Photo: Nils Nilsen

Although there’s no substitute for an all-at-once long workout, there may be a few reasons to do a single-sport double workout.

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Photo: Nils Nilsen


You’ve probably done plenty of double workouts—swim in the morning, run later in the day—depending on your experience in the sport. Although there’s no substitute for an all-at-once long workout because of the race-specific stimulus it provides, there may be a few reasons to do a single-sport double workout, especially with running. Some USAT coaches weigh in on when and why they use this two-a-day technique.

If you’re new to longer distances

Swimmers start doing double workouts to build volume starting at a very young age. “Two-a-days are in my regular bag of tricks, especially when I am building someone up for longer distance running,” says Dominion Cycling and Tri Club coach Trey McKinnon of Virginia. “I will have athletes do an easy run in Zone 1/2 in the morning of about an hour, followed by a harder or slightly longer run in the evening, or maybe just keep both at the same level and distance/time.”

RELATED: How To Nail The Ironman Marathon

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Dear Coach: How Can I Make My Transitions Faster? http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/training/dear-coach-can-make-transitions-faster_97604 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/training/dear-coach-can-make-transitions-faster_97604#comments Thu, 17 Apr 2014 22:38:47 +0000 Katie Malone http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=97604

Photo: Thierry Deketelaere/Endurapix

Coach Katie Malone provides advice for tackling triathlon's fourth discipline: transitions.

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Photo: Thierry Deketelaere/Endurapix

Coach Katie Malone provides advice for tackling triathlon’s fourth discipline: transitions.

Often the difference between standing on the podium at your local race or going home empty-handed has to do with leaving your socks off. Here are a few of my top tricks to a speedy swim to bike transition.

The best way to make up time in transition is to run. As soon as you exit the water, take off running until you get to transition. If it is a wetsuit-legal swim, start stripping the wetsuit off as you are running. Know where your bike is on the transition racks (be sure to note all entry and exit points before the race and even do a walkthrough if you have time) and run all the way to it. Take two steps on your wetsuit and pull it off.

RELATED – Transition Like A Pro: Andy Potts

Skip socks when you go to put on your bike shoes. Getting socks on over wet feet is too difficult and time-consuming. If you need to wear them for the run, they’ll go on easier after they’ve been air-dried on the bike.

Learn how to run with your bike. The best way is to grab your bike with one hand by the stem. This allows you to control the direction your bike is going, which is important when avoiding other athletes. Your free arm is in a traditional running position allowing you to balance and move more quickly. Trying to carry, push it by the seat or run with both hands on the handlebars can often lead to mishaps.

Katie Malone is a USAT-certified coach and 20-time Ironman finisher who coaches athletes around the country through her business, Malone Coaching.

More “Dear Coach” articles from Triathlete.com.

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A Day Of Eating With Gwen Jorgensen http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/photos/day-eating-gwen-jorgensen_97590 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/photos/day-eating-gwen-jorgensen_97590#comments Thu, 17 Apr 2014 17:55:31 +0000 Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=97590

Ever wonder what a pro eats in a day? Olympic triathlete Gwen Jorgensen shares a one-day food diary.

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Get all of the recipes on Gwen’s blog.

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Warm Eggplant, Broccolini And Chickpea Salad Recipe http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/nutrition/warm-eggplant-broccolini-chickpea-salad-recipe_97582 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/nutrition/warm-eggplant-broccolini-chickpea-salad-recipe_97582#comments Thu, 17 Apr 2014 16:31:37 +0000 Jessica Cerra http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=97582

This hearty salad is the perfect side dish for any protein.

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This hearty salad is the perfect side dish for any protein. Bright flavors of cilantro and mint bring out the earthiness of the warm veggies. Try serving over a bed of spinach with crumbled feta cheese, or tossing in a cup of quinoa for a quick meal.

Ingredients

Makes a large 6-8 serving batch

1 medium eggplant
2 large bunches broccolini
2- 15 ounce cans chickpeas
1 cup (4 ounces) julienned sundried tomatoes*
1 teaspoon dried basil
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon freshly cracked pepper
3 tablespoon olive oil
juice of 1 lemon
1 tablespoon fresh cilantro, finely chopped
1 tablespoon fresh mint, finely chopped
1 teaspoon red pepper flakes (optional for spice)

*Look for sundried tomatoes not packed in oil, rather packed loose in a plastic bag.

RELATED RECIPE: Grilled Eggplant Stacks

Preparation

1. Heat oven to 450 degrees. Prepare a large rimmed baking sheet with foil and non-stick cooking spray.
2. Remove the ends from the eggplant, and dice the remaining eggplant into ½ inch pieces.
3. Remove the dried ends from the broccolini stalks. Dice the rest of the broccolini, including stalks into large pieces.
4. In an extra-large bowl, toss the eggplant and broccolini with 2 tablespoons of the olive oil, the oregano, basil, salt and pepper.
5. Lay this mixture evenly on the baking sheet. This will seem like a large amount to put on the sheet but will shrink down in the oven.
6. Bake for 10 minutes. Remove from oven and toss the veggies. Bake 5-10 minutes longer, until the eggplant cooks through and the broccolini is cooked, but still has some texture to it.
7. In the extra-large bowl, whisk together the remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil with the lemon, cilantro and mint (and optional red pepper flakes).
8. Pour the hot veggies into this mixture and toss until well combined.
9. Drain and rinse the chickpeas. Pad dry with a paper towel. Add the chickpeas and the sundried tomatoes to the bowl with the veggies and toss until all of the ingredients are combined.
10. Serve warm. Leftovers can be served chilled or heated.

RELATED RECIPE: Pistachio Crusted Salmon With Mashed Sweet Potato

More recipes from Jessica Cerra.

Jess Cerra is the owner of Fit Food by Jess, a private chef and catering company in Encinitas, Calif. Jess recently launched Harmony Bar, and all natural gluten-and soy free bar designed to tasted like a soft baked cookie. She is an ex-professional XTERRA triathlete and mountain biker, and current elite amateur road cyclist for the SPY GIANT RIDE p/b MRI Endurance team. Follow Jess’ recipes on her “Fit Food by Jess” Facebook page, as well as the “Harmony Bar” Facebook page. Also on twitter @fitfoodbyjess and @harmonybars.

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Dispatch: Longevity In Iron-Distance Racing http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/training/dispatch-longevity-iron-distance-racing_97575 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/training/dispatch-longevity-iron-distance-racing_97575#comments Thu, 17 Apr 2014 16:07:20 +0000 Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=97575

Hillary Biscay, Petr Vabrousek and Belinda Granger.

250. That’s the total iron-distance finishes logged by three racers: Petr Vabrousek (138), Hillary Biscay (63) and Belinda Granger (49).

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Hillary Biscay, Petr Vabrousek and Belinda Granger.


250. That’s the sum total of iron-distance race finishes logged by three of triathlon’s most prolific racers: Petr Vabrousek (138), Hillary Biscay (63) and Belinda Granger (49).

All three of these endurance phenoms are gearing up to increase their tallies with Saturday’s Challenge Taiwan, and I jumped at the opportunity to learn the tips and tools they employ for longevity in the sport.

Petr Vabrousek: Draw boundaries, prioritize family time and don’t overtrain.

“My kids are my recovery [Vabrousek has a 14-year-old son and a two-year-old daughter]. Whenever I’m not racing or at a race, I’m completely disconnected from triathlon. I do my two to three hours of training a day, and other than those two or three hours nobody’s discussing triathlon with me. Nobody in my family is interested whether I had a good session or a bad session or whether I had a puncture on the bike or whatever, including what happens at the races. So for me, to disconnect from triathlon is a very quick thing. I even have trouble when I do have a small mechanical thing on the bike–by the end of my training session I come home and I immediately forget about it, and I only remember when I go for another session in two days and find out I didn’t repair it! Ninety per cent of the day I live a normal life with my family. Just a little part of it is training. I get refreshed pretty quick.”

“I’ve been doing sport since I was 10 when I started rowing, and I’m 41 this year, so it’s 30 years of uninterrupted training. I feel like my body has accumulated enough training over the years and it’s not all that exciting anymore just to train. My last training camp was before my son, who is now 14, started school. The thing is, I did my first triathlon in 1989, which was 25 years ago, and I’ve never ever had anything like overtraining or a stress injury or motivational problems. I’m just completely undertrained! All my career I’ve been completely undertrained. I’ve never ever felt like: OK, that’s enough. I need to take a day off. I’ve never had a feeling that I did too much or that my body hurts. I always feel that I should be training and doing more, but with the kids I just don’t have time to do it. I’ve spoiled my family by being home all day. Whenever I say something like, ‘I’m going for a two-hour bike ride,’ I see long faces. They are like: Two hours? Are you kidding? So these things prevent me from doing too much, and that’s probably the major key for me for longevity in the sport. I see what some of my competitors do in training and I think: That would kill me in a week, more than racing a couple of Ironman races in a week.

“Coming back from an Ironman distance, I’ll have several days completely off. Then before the real training should start I’ll have another race. So especially in the summer season, training never really starts. From May to the end of September usually there’s a major race every weekend for me, either a half or a full Ironman distance. The last two or three years I did eight Ironman races in nine weeks in the summer. And it’s a dream scenario for me. I know that when I do an Ironman on the weekend I need to recover for four days and taper for two, which makes the whole complete week!”

“I also do a lot of strength training–probably two times a week, even in between races. I think that has something to do with it for me, helping to keep my body together.”

“If I would have a desire to stop, I would stop. There’s no desire. I’m always saying I will continue as long as it makes me fun and money. That is talking about professional sport of course–whenever it starts being a matter of money and not being able to support my family with sport, I will have to get another job. But I would still hope to do triathlon and long runs.”

RELATED – Long Course For Life: Finding Longevity In Ironman Racing

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Debate: Are Kicking Sets That Important? http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/training/saras-slam-are-kicking-sets-that-important_51206 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/training/saras-slam-are-kicking-sets-that-important_51206#comments Thu, 17 Apr 2014 15:15:03 +0000 Jené Shaw http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=51206

Beyond initially learning how to kick, how important are kicking sets? Sara McLarty debates this month’s contender: Shaun Guest.

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Triathletes aren’t known as the most powerful kickers in the pool. Because many hail from running, their inflexible ankles make it difficult to develop the perfect flutter. Beyond initially learning how to kick, how important are kicking sets? Sara McLarty debates Shaun Guest, assistant coach for the University of California, San Diego Masters swimming program. After the debate, check out the drills they mention at the bottom.

Sara: In swimming, technique plays a bigger part than fitness, strength and power combined. Some triathletes think they can stroke their way through the swim with only upper-body strength and rely on their legs for the bike and run. As a result, many don’t work on their kick technique during training, but kicking sets are important for overall improvement.

Shaun: Every swim coach will agree that mastery of the flutter kick is essential to becoming a better, faster swimmer. However, performing an elegant six-beat kick in freestyle relies more on core strength and less on leg power. As the hips rotate, one side of the core is stabilized while the other side is mobilized. The stabilized side keeps the body balanced as power is generated through the pull. Rather than kick sets, triathletes should practice the 1-2-3 Drill (#1 below) to connect the legs to the core during the pull phase.

Sara: I agree that the age-old idea of kicking endless yards is not what any triathlete needs. Learning how to time kicking motions with arm strokes is key, as well as adapting an efficient flutter kicking motion that propels the swimmer forward.

Shaun: Comparing swimmers and triathletes is like comparing apples and oranges. Yes triathletes swim, but many have overdeveloped quads and tight hip flexors. Since power from the kick primarily comes from the hip flexors, kick sets with beginners may continue to strengthen the quads and inhibit proper long-axis rotation of the core. If the hip stabilizers opposite the side of the pull are not activated, then power is generated more from the shoulder. To avoid this, focus on strengthening your core, glute and hip extensors (see Extend Leg Drill and Vertical Kicking With Weight below).

Sara: Just because triathletes aren’t swimmers doesn’t mean they should completely eliminate kicking. Kicking sets just need a high rate of variation. I am also a firm believer in flexible rubber fins. Not only do they encourage a swimmer’s toes to be pointed, but the athlete gets more feedback about the motions of his or her legs because of the increased surface area.

Shaun: I am also a huge fan of using swim equipment. I use Finis front snorkels with buoyancy drills that utilize the core and legs together (see Gadget Drill below). Two critical factors we haven’t talked about are buoyancy and body drag. Swimmers lacking buoyancy tend to kick wildly as sinking legs force the body underwater. I agree kicking sets are necessary; however, kicking with a board ultimately puts the body in an “uphill position,” wasting energy. Working on buoyancy drills is an even better way to turn triathletes into efficient swimming machines.

Triathlete final thoughts: Your wetsuit can only take you so far—you need both a decent kick and a good body position to really propel yourself forward. Instead of the boring kick-with-a-board sets you’re used to, try the suggested drills below.

RELATED: Why It’s Important To Conquer The Swim Kick

Advanced Drills

Sick of traditional kicking drills? Try these instead.

“Kicking sets should have a large amount of variation,” says Sara McLarty. Instead of kicking down the pool with a board, McLarty suggests these different positions: underwater; on the back; on the side with one arm extended; against the wall and kicking other strokes. Coach Shaun Guest offers these non-traditional drills to help with buoyancy and your kick.

 1. 1-2-3 Drill
Count one kick per stroke, progress to two kicks, then finally three kicks. Start to pull on the count of the last kick, then begin the kick after complete rotation to the opposite side. When done right it can be more effective than pure kick sets.

2. Extend Leg Drill
Swim with one leg extended out of water, then switch to the opposite leg after a 25.

3. Vertical Kicking With Weight
Try vertical kicking sets holding a 1–5-pound object out of the water (10 rounds, 45 seconds kicking, 15 seconds off). “During this set, the legs are forced to kick with equal force and direction, while the core and shoulders contract in unison,” Guest says.

4. Gadget Drill
The objective of the drill is to eliminate up-and-down movement of the hips as the body rotates. While wearing a snorkel, relax arms by your side and begin kicking in a flat position. Rotate to your side focusing on 1) a slight downward press from the chest and 2) vertical displacement of the hips. If your butt remains near the surface from the prone to side position and you can feel water over the back of the head, you’ve achieved neutral buoyancy.

RELATED – Sara’s Slam: Should You Always Race In A Wetsuit?

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Ironman CEO Announces Major Change to Kona Start http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/news/ironman-ceo-announces-major-change-kona-start_97561 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/news/ironman-ceo-announces-major-change-kona-start_97561#comments Thu, 17 Apr 2014 01:00:54 +0000 Julia Polloreno http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=97561

Andrew Messick and 2013 Ironman world champion Mirinda Carfrae. Photo: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image

An update with Ironman's Andrew Messick

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Andrew Messick and 2013 Ironman world champion Mirinda Carfrae. Photo: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image

Ironman CEO Andrew Messick announces a separate age-group start for men and women at this year’s Ironman World Championship, fewer North American qualifying slots for 70.3 worlds, and talks doping and more with Triathlete magazine editor-in-chief Julia Beeson Polloreno.

Julia Polloreno: With this week’s announcements of two new Ironman events—in Barcelona and Taiwan—it begs the question: How do you grow the international Ironman event roster, while the number of Kona slots must remain the same?

Andrew Messick: The big challenge that we have in Kona is not in fact the size of the pier, which is what most people think, but rather the extreme concentration of gifted athletes in that particular race. It creates problems unique to Kona. Least year we had 1,100 athletes get out of the water in a 15-minute period, between 55 minutes and 1:10. That concentration of really strong swimmers, all of whom can ride a bike, is our operational limiter. What we’re most mindful of when we think about how we manage Kona, and we’re really focused on, is how can you have a world championship event with the best athletes in the world and yet still create a race that’s going to be fair for everybody. So we’re very thoughtful about that, and our ability to solve some of those operational problems is really what is going to govern the size of the race at Kona, and by extension, any slots we have at different races around the world. We are virtually certain to have a separate age-group men and age-group women start in Kona this year. That is largely designed to manage and reduce swim density. Swim density of course creates conditions where bike density happens because the rate at which people get out of the water and onto the bike course determines the extent to which we’re able to have a clean bike. The more direct answer is: we expect the size of Kona to increase.

JP: So you’re making operational changes to accommodate that.

AM: Right. We have to. The operational changes really relate to ‘how do you have a clean, fair race and still be able to accommodate the best athletes in the world?’ The best athletes in the world are coming from all over the place—and we have more and more of them. As we grow our footprint, we’re going to see increasing numbers of athletes from different parts of the world. We don’t want to have those slots come at the expense of slots from our historic strength countries—the U.S., Canada, Germany, Australia. That’s a balance we’re trying to find.

JP: You don’t anticipate reducing the number of slots at those marquee Ironman events?

AM: We hope not to, and we are de-emphasizing 70.3s that have Kona slots. You’re seeing a trend of more and more 70.3s that aren’t offering Kona slots. We expect that’s going to continue. We’re looking for other areas to find opportunities to preserve the slots that we have at as many races as we possibly can.

JP: At Oceanside 70.3 recently, I was talking post-race with Andrew Starykowicz, who told me a little anecdote about relentlessly heckling another pro racer who was in the field and who’d been previously busted and served a ban for doping. You told Lance he couldn’t race Ironman, which I know was a decision based on WTC being a WADA signatory, and others who have served bans are back racing, sometimes to a hostile reception from athletes like Starykowicz who feel they shouldn’t ever be able to race again. Will WTC be staying the course regarding its WADA status—and how do you navigate this obviously emotionally charged issue?

AM: I don’t anticipate us leaving WADA. We don’t have any plans to do it, and I think it would take a fairly dramatic set of circumstances for us to leave the one global organization dedicated to clean sport. For us to walk away from them would really require an unusual set of circumstances, and one that we don’t anticipate. This is difficult, because everyone has a point of view about whether the punishment fits the crime. There are those that believe that athletes who are sanctioned for doping infractions should be banned for life. I get it. I understand on an emotional level why people would feel that way, but I also think it’s fair that punishment be proportionate to the crime and that people who make mistakes—even serious ones—be given additional opportunities to live their lives and make their livings. There’s nothing simple about it, and I think it’s conceptually easy to say ‘first offense, banned for life,’ but when you really think it through you’ve got to deal with issues of justice, fairness and appropriateness. You have to live in that world if you walk away from WADA, and our belief is that the WADA code, which is very thoughtful and has been embraced by almost all sporting institutions—they’ve thought through all those issues. I think their point of view of the punishment and the crime is more thoughtful and nuanced than people might necessarily or immediately see. I get all the emails and see the social media and understand the frustration people have—one of the things that makes our sport even more complicated is that a lot of those doping bans happened when people were participating in a sport other than triathlon. That just makes all of that harder.

JP: With so many events and more being added all the time, it seems like we’re not seeing super deep fields at anything outside of the championship races. How do you create more racing opportunities for age-groupers and a window to the Ironman experience but still preserve that sense of excitement you get from watching a fiercely contested pro race with the sport’s top names?

AM: I’ll use the example of Ironman South Africa because I was just there 10 days ago. I would certainly not characterize the age-group race as uncompetitive. It was as competitive as it was extraordinary. And the pro race was extraordinary too. Nils Frommhold went to the front and Kyle Buckingham, the young South African guy, was in second all day and blew up and got passed by Faris Al-Sultan, then he passed Faris back to win second place. And in the women’s race you had Jodie Swallow who was out in front by herself all day long get run down in the last kilometer by Simone Brandli and Lucy Gossage. That’s one of your “uncompetitive” races and it was fabulous. Tremendous performances by two local South African athletes, finishes that were gripping. So I don’t fundamentally accept that the races aren’t competitive. I will say that we’ve really tried to structure the point system and the prize money to reinforce and provide opportunities for people who compete at Kona well to have chances to compete against one another. The Melbourne field was super deep, Frankfurt we expect to be super deep, Tremblant will be super deep, and we see the same thing on the 70.3 side. So, I think there are a lot of races, people compete in races for lots of reasons, and we do put a fair amount of effort and energy into trying to make sure we’ve got concentrations in our large point, large prize money events, but that there’s also a strong local flavor at other races too.

JP: With the announcement that the 70.3 world championship will be in Austria in 2015, obviously a dramatic departure from the Vegas venue, how different do you envision the field looking?

AM: We’re going to rebalance all the slots—that’s the first thing. Starting with the 2015 qualifying cycle, which starts in April 2014, virtually all North American races will have fewer slots and all European races will have more slots. We’re very much anticipating—and engineering in the process—that there will be more qualifying opportunities in Europe for the 2015 world championships than there were in 2014. I would expect—and this is broadly speaking—if it’s going to be a 2,500-athlete race, we’ll have 1,000 North Americans, 1,000 Europeans, and 500 from Latin America, Australia, New Zealand and Asia-Pacific. Roughly speaking. We want there to be more local opportunities for Europeans to race a world championship. What we don’t know, of course, is the extent to which Europeans are going to go elsewhere to get their slots. What we do see is, for example, a lot of Canadians are pushing to find slots for Tremblant because they want to be able to race a world championship in Canada. I think we’re going to see that a lot of Europeans are going to start searching for opportunities to qualify because if you’re a European age-group triathlete, being able to compete in a world championship is something that’s going to resonate.

JP: What has been the reception to the transfer program you launched earlier this year? Do you expect to expand on it, change it at all?

AM: It’s been extremely popular with our athletes. It provides a lot of opportunities for athletes who, for whatever reason, can’t participate in the race they originally signed up for to race later, earlier or shorter. We’ve seen hundreds and hundreds—probably in the 500 range—of athletes who’ve taken advantage so far, and they’re happy. Almost everyone who signed up for a race doesn’t want a refund or partial refund—they want an opportunity to compete.

JP: How has the SwimSmart initiative been working? You’ve tried a few different approaches at different Ironman events. Did one approach work better than another? Will there still be mass starts at some events like Ironman Arizona?

AM: There are still going to be mass starts, for sure. We’re going to expand rolling starts, which, by and large, we thought worked very well. The athletes like them a lot, and we got higher swim satisfaction scores for SwimSmart starts—higher scores than from the previous year’s race when they were mass starts. We also had fewer people who had to abandon the swim with SwimSmart starts, and our operational teams thought they were better able and in better positions to help athletes who needed help. By and large it was a success, and we will continue to expand it both domestically and internationally in 2014.

JP: Last week you tweeted that in a single week you’d been on 10 flights and visited 4 countries. And then you raced the 70.3 relay in Florida. Give me your best travel tip for triathletes.

AM: Don’t do that! I try to manage my effort—and my expectations—pretty carefully. What I try not to do is put myself in the position where I have unrealistic expectations given training and travel. We’re all competitive people, want to do well and have goals for ourselves, and I think it’s really important that all athletes who have busy lives have realistic expectations for what they can do, given everything else that is going on in their lives. If you’re not in the position to be able to deliver a triple-A performance, don’t let it get you down. Sometimes you’re just not going to be able to do it, considering everthing else that life throws at you.

JP: With Boston on everyone’s minds, it brings the issue of event security and participant safety to the forefront. I assume WTC has a rigorous safety protocol in place for all your events around the world, but can you speak generally about your efforts to ensure a safe racer experience for all your athletes?

AM: Boston, unfortunately, changed the way events have to be organized. At all races, you see bomb-sniffing dogs now and you didn’t used to. You have to be more careful—not just in Hawaii but everywhere—about packages, backpacks, just the basic blocking and tackling of event security. Everyone in our industry has to grapple with that new reality—it’s running races, cycling events, triathlons. We have to put more behind it, and we are. We wish it were different, but we’re operators, and if you’re an operator you play the cards you are dealt, and that’s what we’ve been dealt.

 

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A Tough Start For Triathlon As An NCAA Sport http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/news/tough-start-triathlon-ncaa-sport_97559 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/news/tough-start-triathlon-ncaa-sport_97559#comments Wed, 16 Apr 2014 23:25:14 +0000 Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=97559

Athletes compete at the 2014 USAT Collegiate National Championships, a club-based competition. Photo: Mario Cantu

The New York Times is reporting that only one school has committed to adding women's triathlon as a collegiate sport.

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Athletes compete at the 2014 USAT Collegiate National Championships, a club-based competition. Photo: Mario Cantu

The New York Times is reporting that only one school has committed to adding women’s triathlon as a collegiate sport.

The N.C.A.A. in January adopted women’s triathlon as an “emerging sport,” giving it a decade to attract at least 40 varsity teams in order to become a championship sport.

More than 160 colleges and universities have triathlon clubs, and at least a dozen universities told the N.C.A.A. in a letter that they would consider adding a varsity program.

But when asked about that commitment, only one—Marymount University in Virginia, which already has a varsity program—said it planned to compete at the N.C.A.A. level.

“Right now, we’re not planning to offer it,” said Troy Dannen, the athletic director at Northern Iowa, which signed the letter. “There’s a lot of us waiting to see how it plays out.”

Athletic directors at other colleges had similar answers. Without more of a commitment, triathlon could face the same fate as women’s archery, badminton, squash or handball, all former emerging sports that never caught on.

Read more: Nytimes.com

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Dispatch: 10 Minutes In Taiwan With Belinda Granger http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/video/dispatch-10-minutes-taiwan-belinda-granger_97519 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/video/dispatch-10-minutes-taiwan-belinda-granger_97519#comments Wed, 16 Apr 2014 22:10:15 +0000 Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=97519

Belinda Granger, Challenge Taiwan’s women’s defending champion, is gearing up for her 50th iron-distance race on Saturday.

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Belinda Granger, Challenge Taiwan’s women’s defending champion, is gearing up for her 50th iron-distance race on Saturday. Yes, that’s FIVE-OH. And it may also be her final one, as she recently announced that she would retire at the close of this season. I simply had to sit down with Belinda to talk about her upcoming race–and her amazing career thus far.

RELATED – ProFile: Belinda Granger

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2014 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide: Wheels http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/triathlete-buyers-guide/2014-triathlete-buyers-guide-wheels_97522 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/triathlete-buyers-guide/2014-triathlete-buyers-guide-wheels_97522#comments Wed, 16 Apr 2014 20:26:05 +0000 Ian Buchanan and Aaron Hersh http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=97522

Looking to buy new wheels this year? Check out the 14 featured in the 2014 Triathlete Buyer's Guide.

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The 2014 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide magazine is out on newsstands now (and check out the digital version), and we’re giving you a sneak peek right here. Check out the wheels from the guide here and check back to Triathlete.com for more Buyer’s Guide content.

Campagnolo Bullet 80

$2,400, Campagnolo.com
The draw: Iconic brand association

Choosing Campagnolo parts for your bike is more than an equipment decision—it serves as a membership card into a club of cycling devotees. The traditional Italian company hasn’t caught up with the technological advances in wheel design made by some brands, and ride feel is decidedly rough on straight roads and in corners. Riding these wheels is a loud statement of devotion to decades of cycling history.

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Photos: 2014 XTERRA West Championship http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/photos/photos-2014-xterra-west-championship_97471 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/photos/photos-2014-xterra-west-championship_97471#comments Wed, 16 Apr 2014 18:21:18 +0000 Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=97471

The United States' Josiah Middaugh earned his third XTERRA West title in four years, while Bermuda's Flora Duffy dominated the women's race

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Photos: XTERRA

The United States’ Josiah Middaugh earned his third XTERRA West title in four years, while Bermuda’s Flora Duffy dominated the women’s race at Lake Las Vegas. Read the race recap.

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How To Pace Your Race http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/training/how-to-pace-your-race_35076 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/training/how-to-pace-your-race_35076#comments Wed, 16 Apr 2014 17:47:54 +0000 Scott Fliegelman http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=35076

Photo: John David Becker

It’s all about pacing. If you pace the swim and bike right, you’ll set yourself up for a better run and a stronger finish.

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Photo: John David Becker

In most cases you can’t walk away from a from a race (especially an Ironman) and say, “I had a great bike, but an awful run”; one is directly related to the other. It’s all about pacing. If you pace the swim and bike right, you’ll set yourself up for a better run and a stronger finish.

Most age-groupers make the mistake of comparing their performance with other racers or a goal time instead of looking more closely at how they used their fitness throughout the race.

Going into your next race, set a reasonably challenging goal that is based on the actual training you did, not the training you had hoped to do. Use recent field tests, time trials or practice races in order to clarify your realistic current fitness and then follow the tips below to smartly pace your race.

Swim

Don’t worry about time. Triathletes can make the mistake of gauging swim success based on time, but courses are almost always short or long, so there is no sense in getting overly excited or dejected due to seemingly random buoy placement. Instead, base success on a smart start position, minimal contact and anxiety, skilled sighting and maintaining good technique from start to finish.

RELATED – By The Numbers: The Iron Swim

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Andy Potts’ Cold-Water Swim Tips http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/training/andy-potts-cold-water-swim-tips_97467 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/training/andy-potts-cold-water-swim-tips_97467#comments Wed, 16 Apr 2014 15:29:11 +0000 Steve Godwin http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=97467

Don't let a chilly swim derail your race before you reach T1. Top swimmer Andy Potts shares his advice for competing in a cold-water race.

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Don’t let a chilly swim derail your race before you reach T1. Top swimmer Andy Potts shares his advice for competing in a cold-water race. This video was shot before this year’s Ironman 70.3 California, which features a notoriously cold swim in Oceanside Harbor.

RELATED: Coping With Cold-Water Swimming

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Challenge Roth Announces Stellar Pro Field http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/news/challenge-roth-announces-stellar-pro-field_97463 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/news/challenge-roth-announces-stellar-pro-field_97463#comments Wed, 16 Apr 2014 15:12:15 +0000 Liz Hichens http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=97463

Photo: Steve Godwin

Challenge Roth today announced the professional field for the iron-distance race, set for July 20, and it features some of the biggest

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Photo: Steve Godwin

The July 20 race will welcome some of the top names in the sport.

Challenge Roth today announced the professional field for the iron-distance race, set for July 20, and it features some of the biggest names in triathlon.

Defending Challenge Roth champion Dirk Bockel (LUX) will return and he’ll face 2012 Ironman world champion Pete Jacobs, 2013 Kona runner-up Luke McKenzie, 2013 Kona fourth-place finisher James Cunnama (RSA), Eneko Llanos (ESP), Timo Bracht (GER) and Nils Frommhold (GER).

The women’s start list is highlighted by two-time Ironman world champion Mirinda Carfrae (AUS). Also set to race is 2013 Kona runner-up Rachel Joyce (GBR). Last year in Kona both went under nine hours, with Carfrae establishing a new Ironman World Championship course record. They’re two of the fastest athletes on the circuit, and they may be looking to break the iron-distance world record time of 8:18:13, which was set by Chrissie Wellington at Roth in 2011.

Three other top-10 finishers from last year’s Ironman World Championship will also be making the start. Yvonne Van Vlerken (fourth in Hawaii), Caroline Steffen (fifth in Hawaii) and Michelle Vesterby (eighth in Hawaii will all compete. Steffen and Van Vlerken went one-two at last year’s Roth event and know how to put together a fast race on this course.
The July 20 race will celebrate 30 years of triathlon in Roth. The spots for age groupers sold out in record time last year, with 5,500 athletes ready to compete. The race is an iconic event in the sport and usually sees over 200,000 spectators.

Check back for a complete pro start list.

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Easy Ways To Prepare Fresh Fish http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/nutrition/easy-ways-prepare-fresh-fish_97459 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/04/nutrition/easy-ways-prepare-fresh-fish_97459#comments Tue, 15 Apr 2014 22:19:43 +0000 Lauren Antonucci http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=97459

Photo: iStock

Fish is one of the easiest things to cook well—it generally needs little prep work and requires only a short cooking time.

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Photo: iStock

Q: What’s the best way to prepare fresh fish that is fairly easy, too?

A: Fish is one of the easiest things to cook well—it generally needs little prep work and requires only a short cooking time. Go to your nearest fish market and ask for their freshest, thin white fish (such as tilapia, blackfish, flounder or cod). To prepare, lay the fish on a large plate, brush lightly with olive oil, and season with salt and pepper. Then simply bake it in a lightly oiled, deep, oven-safe dish at 350 degrees for 5 minutes per side, or cook on a lightly oiled grill for 5 minutes per side.

Also, consider scallops. The key is to buy large, fresh scallops and avoid overcooking so they’re not rubbbery. Coat scallops lightly with olive oil, salt and pepper, then thread onto skewers (flat side down) and grill on high for 4 minutes per side. Or sauté the scallops in a hot skillet, 4–5 minutes per side for 1-inch-thick scallops. They pair well with sautéed spinach and pasta.

Lauren Antonucci, R.D., is a board-certified specialist in sports dietetics, three-time Ironman finisher and the founding director of Nutrition Energy in New York City.

If you’d like to have your nutrition question answered on this page, email it to fuel@competitorgroup.com.

Related Recipes:

- Roasted Tomatillos And Tilapia
- Pan Seared Halibut, Veggies And Soba Noodles Over Red Curry Broth
- Swordfish With Lemon, White Wine, Shallots, Basil And Tomatoes
- A Healthy Ceviche Recipe For Endurance Athletes
- Pistachio Crusted Salmon With Mashed Sweet Potato

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