Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com Triathlon Training, Gear, Nutrition, Photos, Race Results & Calendars Thu, 30 Jul 2015 11:30:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0.1 Learning To Love The Swim http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/training/learning-to-love-the-swim_120023 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/training/learning-to-love-the-swim_120023#comments Thu, 30 Jul 2015 11:30:29 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=120023

Illustration by Hunter King.

Advice for the adult-onset swimmer.

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Illustration by Hunter King.

Advice for the adult-onset swimmer.

I can pick out the “swimmers” at the start line of any triathlon. They are the only ones who don’t look like they are about to puke. One of the biggest hurdles for many people getting involved in the sport of triathlon is swimming. If you did not grow up on the swim team, learning to swim as an adult may be incredibly challenging. So how do you pick up swimming and learn to love it, when you don’t really know how to do it (or do it well)? First, you believe. Next, you work.

Believe: The first “to do” on your list is to convince your brain that you love to swim. If you don’t enjoy swimming, then go ahead and start repeating to yourself: “I love to swim. I love to swim.” Much of triathlon success (and failure) may be attributed to mental strength. So start tricking your mind into loving it now.

Swimming really is a wonderful thing. It’s easy on your joints. It’s great for building your endurance. And the smell of chlorine? Heaven! I love smelling like a pool after a swim.

(Perhaps I do not use the correct soap.) It reminds me of the hard work I put in before some folks are even awake.

You really can learn to love the water by convincing yourself that you do. When I was a teenager in Olympic weightlifting, my training included one lift that I loathed. Each day on the drive to the gym, my mom would say, “Tell yourself that you love it!” I would roll my eyes. But internally, I began to repeat, “I love this” before each session. Eventually, that particular lift became my best and favorite lift. Turns out, my dear momma started me on this brilliant “believe” training even before any tri coach came into the picture.

RELATED – Beginner’s Luck: Finding The Confidence To Reach Your Goals

Work

A common saying about triathlon swimming is: You cannot win a triathlon in the swim, but you can lose it. Practicing the swim is vitally important. First, it is quite dangerous to slack on the swim. You must work and train hard. In cycling and running, you can coast or slow to a walk. In swimming, that’s not an option.

Second, the swim start in a race is often crowded and full of intense energy. The goal of the swim should be to feel comfortable in the water and also, to avoid unnecessary fatigue going into the next part of the race. The less fatigued you are coming out of the water, the better your overall race will be. If you start a race completely petrified, with your heart racing and mind distracted, you are creating a dangerous environment for yourself (not to mention, probably setting yourself up for a bad race).

I will never forget my first day of swimming as a new triathlete. Do I jump in the water or use the ladder? Do my goggles go under or over my swim cap? How exactly do I swim freestyle?

After slapping myself in the face about 16 times trying to put on my non-silicone, hair-tearing cap and situating the cap over my ears, under my ears, then over again, I was ready. I wore my fancy new Speedo goggles. I eased myself down into the pool, scraping my back on the wall in the process. I dunked under the water, and came up quickly, sputtering.

Oh my gosh, I haven’t been underwater in forever! I thought. I gained my composure.

OK, ready! I went under again and I pushed myself off the wall with my feet, and I began to flail through the water. After five strokes, I stood straight up in the lap lane—not even halfway down the pool. I could not breathe and my heart was racing. What in the … ? I went back underwater and tried to swim to the end of the pool. I finally made it, and I grabbed onto the wall, struggling for air. To say I was shocked would be an understatement.

That day in the pool was an opportune time to give up. To think I would ever swim in a triathlon seemed impossible. But I spent that morning swimming wall to wall, resting, struggling for breath, catching my breath and then starting again. The next swim workout, I was able to do a little more. And with each successive workout, a tad more and more.

Swimming may feel like the most evil discipline of triathlon when you start. But even if you can’t swim a lick right now, you will see big fitness gains almost immediately in the pool—more so than on the bike or the run. If you stay with it and push through, in a few short weeks, you will see your workout go from a pitiful 100 yards to a decent (but slow) 500 yards. A month or so after that, you’ll be swimming 1500 yards without stopping, and you will be amazed at the progress.

RELATED: 5 Ways To Make The Open Water Less Intimidating

Swimming 101

Learn to breathe bilaterally (on both sides) during your freestyle. Standard bilateral breathing involves breathing every third stroke and will benefit you in rough water conditions where breathing on one particular side may be your only or best option due to the sun or waves. If you can’t handle breathing every third stroke, then swim one length breathing on the right—and come back breathing on the left.

For swim equipment, starting out all you need to start is a pair of goggles, a swim cap and a swimsuit (and maybe a wetsuit). Invest in a good silicone cap, which is thicker than latex and won’t pinch or pull your hair. Goggles should have a good fit and feel like they naturally suction to your face. Once you find a brand and model that you love, buy in quantity and hold on to them for dear life.

Now, go believe that you love to swim … and get to work.

Meredith Atwood is a wife, mom, attorney, Ironman, coach and author of Triathlon for the Every Woman. She is a 2015 Klean Team USA member, lives in Atlanta and blogs at SwimBikeMom.com.

More Beginner’s Luck.

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Video: An 8-Year-Old Triathlete’s Inspiring Finish http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/news/video-an-8-year-old-triathletes-inspiring-finish_120019 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/news/video-an-8-year-old-triathletes-inspiring-finish_120019#comments Wed, 29 Jul 2015 21:29:04 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=120019

This video of eight-year-old Bailey Matthews crossing a triathlon finish line has captured the hearts of people from around the world.

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This video of eight-year-old Bailey Matthews of England crossing the finish line at the Castle Howard Triathlon in North Yorkshire has captured the hearts of people from around the world. Matthews, who has cerebral palsy, completed the 100-meter swim, 4K bike and 1.3K run and then thrilled the crowd by ditching his walker and crossing the finish line under his own power.

RELATED – Recalled: From 5K To Ironman, Team Hoyt Is Unstoppable

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2015 Triathlete Swimsuit Feature: Bermudian Bliss http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/photos/2015-triathlete-swimsuit-feature-bermudian-bliss_119975 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/photos/2015-triathlete-swimsuit-feature-bermudian-bliss_119975#comments Wed, 29 Jul 2015 20:54:22 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=119975

Our triathlete models explore the island’s pink beaches and turquoise coves in the latest active swim styles.

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Our triathlete models explore the island’s pink beaches and turquoise coves in the latest active swim styles. Plus: How to find the right suit for you. Photographs by Jeff Clark hair and makeup by Marlena Robbins.


You could win a trip to Bermuda! Learn more about the island here and enter to win here.

How To Find The Right Suit For You

Finding the most flattering (and functional) active swimsuits for a specific body type can be a tall task. That’s why we sourced expert opinions from a competitive swimwear buyer for SwimOutlet.com and the swimwear designer and long-time triathlete behind Betty Designs. For women with broad shoulders (or “swimmer’s shoulders”), look for printed patterns, like this Carve Designs one-piece suit, which draws attention away from your shoulders, says Megan Mills, SwimOutlet.com’s associate category manager for aquatics. Thicker straps can also break up the appearance of wide shoulders; however, halter-style tops only accentuate them.

If you’d like to make full hips and thighs appear smaller, look for “extra leg coverage,” Mills says, like in these TYR boyshort-style bottoms, and avoid any high-cut leg designs.

While men have fewer options in swimsuits, there are benefits to each of the swimwear styles, Mills says. A boardshort style, like in these Dakine trunks, is versatile for any type of swimmer, and easily transitions between recreational purposes and lap swimming while offering full leg coverage. Jammers, which have a compressive fit to just above the knee, offer leg coverage and a “sleeker feeling,” she says, which can lead to a faster time in the water. Swim briefs feature a minimal cut and are typically worn in training by more experienced swimmers, as it gives legs “full freedom of movement” and a less constricting feeling.

When it comes to deciding between a two-piece suit and one-piece suit, go with what you feel most comfortable in, says Kristin Mayer, a triathlete and the owner of the triathlon apparel brand Betty Designs. “Even though people swear swimming laps in a one-piece suit is faster due to less drag, I wear a bikini all the time—I just feel more feminine in it,” she says. “The best suit is the suit you feel your best wearing to the pool.”

For larger chests, Mills recommends full neckline coverage, a contouring side splice design and thick straps, like in this Sporti tankini top. Also, built-in soft cups can be helpful: “Like a sports bra, soft cups provide bust support while in the water,” Mills says. “Speedo and TYR are among the top brands that provide a fashionable and functional fit for a swimmer that desires extra support.” Women with large busts should avoid deep V-neck designs.

Vertical graphics and asymmetry can elongate your figure, Mayer says, so athletes looking to disguise a tummy can benefit from the side splice design on this Aqua Sphere one-piece suit. Mills recommends looking for suit styles that feature compression, color blocking and two-piece bottoms with a higher waist. Stay away from low-waisted bottoms, or any cut-out designs on the side of the stomach.

Meet The Models

Kristen Palmer
In 2013, age-group triathlete Kristen Palmer traded the snowy winters of Ontario, Canada, for the pink sands of Bermuda’s beaches when she got a job as a chartered accountant working for PwC Bermuda. So when she was selected to model for the Triathlete shoot, she didn’t have to travel very far.

At the time of her move, Palmer was also getting more invested in triathlon, which paired well with Bermuda’s mild, training-conducive weather. As a runner in high school as well as a provincial volleyball and ice hockey player, she now enjoys the individuality of triathlon (so she can determine her own training schedule) and uses the sport as a way to find balance in her life outside of her high-pressure career. “It’s almost a sanctuary [for me],” she says, “especially here in Bermuda, because it’s so beautiful that when you’re training, you wish you could stop every 10 seconds just to take a picture.”

Palmer, who is coached by and trains with her boyfriend, Mark Robinson, is racing Ironman Frankfurt this July and ran the Boston Marathon earlier this year. She’s found success in triathlon so far, and raced at the ITU Age Group World Championship in Edmonton in 2014 for Bermuda. “[Triathlon] is so available, it’s right at your fingertips here,” she says. “It’s such a sense of community. … The big thing for me is the family that you develop from doing a sport like this.”

A first-time swimsuit model, Palmer’s developed a “whole new appreciation” for modeling. “It’s been the most incredible experience,” she says.

Rob Thwaites
Orlando, Fla., native Rob Thwaites is no stranger to the camera—he was a professional model on runways in Milan and Miami Beach before he decided to finish school at the University of Central Florida. It was while in school that he first started focusing on triathlon training. Not only were long rides and runs ways to “let loose and relax mentally from the stress my classes had created,” he says, but they were also a way to “stay ahead of genetics.” In 2009, Thwaites’ grandmother died of heart disease, but she also suffered from high blood pressure, high cholesterol and type-2 diabetes. Thwaites’ mother is a stage-3 breast cancer survivor, and his dad survived prostate cancer and battles high blood pressure and high cholesterol.

Despite the deck being stacked against him, so to speak, Thwaites’ father, 50 years old and 40 pounds overweight, trained for months to race in his first triathlon in 2010. Inspired by watching his dad, Thwaites did his first triathlon a few weeks later. Modeling took him away from triathlon for a while until he was at UCF. He joined the UCF tri team and soon enjoyed the camaraderie as much as the workouts. “Not only is triathlon training a way for me to stay active and keep a good work-life balance, but the races are a social event, where I get to compete against my training partners and friends,” he says.

Thwaites now works for a clinical research company, where he coordinates clinical trials to research neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s and multiple sclerosis. He’s stepped up his triathlon game the last few years—he’s podiumed at several local races, and completed 70.3 Augusta, 70.3 Florida and the 2014 Ironman Florida. This year, he plans to race some more Florida races, including St. Anthony’s and Heartland Triathlon, before finishing the season at Challenge Florida in Venice Beach.

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Setting Time Goals For A Half-Ironman http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/training/setting-time-goals-for-a-half-ironman_81619 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/training/setting-time-goals-for-a-half-ironman_81619#comments Wed, 29 Jul 2015 19:41:47 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=81619

Photo: Vanessa Belfiore / Shutterstock.com

Some general guidelines to ensure you are setting your day up for success.

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Photo: Vanessa Belfiore / Shutterstock.com

Dear Coach: How do I set time goals for my next half-Ironman?

How many times have you heard coaches tell athletes that they should avoid setting time-based goals? I’m going to echo those words of advice but appreciate that it is human nature to want to do it. Here are some general guidelines to ensure you are setting your day up for success.

The Swim

It is very, very difficult to set a swim goal time as conditions change, buoys move, navigation accuracy can vary and you may or may not get a draft. Bottom line: Setting a swim time goal can give you a false sense of satisfaction (or disappointment) when you exit the swim. You are better off learning the feel for a pace that is appropriate for the distance. A simple test is to go to the pool, get warmed up and perform a max effort 400 time trial (with fairly even pacing). As a rough guide, your half-Ironman pace would likely be around 5–8 seconds per 100 slower than your 400 time for beginner to intermediate level athletes. Go back to the pool and try swimming 1000 at 5–8 seconds slower than your 400 pace and assess how this feels. Repeat this over several sessions and remember if you plan on starting fast in the race, you must practice this regularly in training. Note: An all-out sprint start is not advised for beginner to intermediate-level athletes.

RELATED: Open-Water Swimming Tips From The Pros

The Bike

Time goals on the bike are also massively influenced by factors you cannot control: wind, road surface, terrain, etc. I encourage athletes to set power or heart rate ceiling numbers not to exceed. For most age-group athletes, a ceiling of 85 percent of functional threshold power (FTP) works well. If you are racing by heart rate, the ceiling should also be around 85 percent of your maximum heart rate on the bike. These are ceiling numbers, not targets—learning what “feels” right is important.

RELATED: Kelly Williamson’s Five Tips For Half-Ironman Bike Speed

The Run

The run is the safest place to set time goals. As with the bike I encourage athletes to have a ceiling pace. This ceiling should only apply for the first third of the run, then racing by feel should take over (but using a GPS watch can help keep you on task). To set a realistic pace, you need to know your fresh pace times. If you have an accurate 5K or 10K time, you can use the Jack Daniels Vdot system to get a good estimate of what you are capable of running for a standalone half-marathon (search online for Jack Daniels Vdot calculator). Add around 8–10 percent to your fresh half-marathon time for a 70.3, and that should ensure you don’t go out too hard.

All of the above points take into account you train specifically for your main race. That means plenty of simulating race conditions at target race pace with solid back-to-back swim/bike/run workouts.

RELATED: Half-Ironman Taper Plan

Follow Triathlete on Twitter @Triathletemag for inspiration, new workout ideas, gear reviews from our editors and more.

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Quick Look: Recon Jet http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/gear-tech/quick-look-recon-jet_119955 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/gear-tech/quick-look-recon-jet_119955#comments Wed, 29 Jul 2015 16:39:19 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=119955

Photo: John David Becker

The first functional heads-up display for running and cycling.

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Photo: John David Becker

The first functional heads-up display for running and cycling.

Instead of having to turn away from the road to look at your bar-mounted computer or a watch, the Recon Jet displays the same information in your peripherals. Think of it as a triathlon training watch built into a pair of glasses—a quick glance and your workout metrics are in plain view. Although Jet isn’t exactly low profile, it doesn’t obstruct vision dramatically when riding or running. Intuitive controls make it easy to operate on the fly. Key training data is tracked and recorded by the device itself (no phone needed), but it also connects to a phone to display texts, control music and more.

Recon Jet

$699, Reconinstruments.com

RELATED – 2015 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide: Computers And Power Meters

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Back Pain Treatment, Exercises And Prevention http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/training/back-pain-treatment-exercises-prevention_103194 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/training/back-pain-treatment-exercises-prevention_103194#comments Wed, 29 Jul 2015 16:35:43 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=103194

Photo: iStock

Nothing can derail your training like back pain—address the weaknesses at the source to avoid unnecessary downtime and discomfort.

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Photo: iStock


Nothing can derail your training like back pain—address the weaknesses at the source to avoid unnecessary downtime and discomfort.

The Symptoms

Muscular back pain usually comes on instantly. Pain radiates from both sides of the spine and the muscles feel as though they’re locked up. It can be severe and debilitating.

What’s Going On In There?

Muscular back pain is the most common type of back pain. It involves the paraspinal muscles, which are strong muscles on either side of the spine that enable you to move, twist and bend the spine.

So what brings on the pain? In general, the paraspinous muscles are too tight, too weak or both. A sudden twisting or wrenching, bending forward, and even a direct impact on the muscle can set it off.

RELATED: Preventing Lower Back Pain

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Big Names Launch Professional Triathlon Union http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/news/big-names-launch-professional-triathlon-union_119951 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/news/big-names-launch-professional-triathlon-union_119951#comments Wed, 29 Jul 2015 16:19:16 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=119951

Three-time Ironman world champion Mirinda Carfrae is a member of the board. Photo: John David Becker

Some of the biggest names in the sport of triathlon have come together to form the Professional Triathlon Union (PTU).

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Three-time Ironman world champion Mirinda Carfrae is a member of the board. Photo: John David Becker

Some of the biggest names in the sport of triathlon have come together to form the Professional Triathlon Union (PTU), the organization announced today.

The global union will work to represent all professional non-drafting triathletes and will aim to “improve the sport in its entirety to benefit pro non-drafting triathletes and all stakeholders.”

The union was formed in 2014 and its founding Board of Directors include some of the biggest names in the sport, including: Jodie Swallow, Rachel Joyce, Helle Frederiksen, Mirinda Carfrae, Meredith Kessler, Mary Beth Ellis, Angela Naeth, Sebastian Kienle, Pete Jacobs, Dirk Bockel, Dylan McNiece, Tim O’Donnell, James Cunnama, Andreas Dreitz and Scott DeFilippis. According to the press release, the group will look to increase the diversity of the board as it grows.

Executive Director Rich Allen, a retired British Pro triathlete based in the US, will manage business operations, project developments and act as chief communicator for the athletes. He is supported by an expert volunteer panel that includes business, legal and financial advisors, as well as retired pro triathletes.

“I am delighted to be involved in this exciting endeavor, which is perhaps one of the greatest developments to ever take place in our sport,” Allen said in the press release. “We look forward to addressing many issues in the professional sport, helping the sport grow in its entirety and building strong working relationships with all stakeholders.”

The PTU has already had “equal positive dialogue” with WTC, Challenge Family and the ITU to discuss communications and working together in the future. According to the PTU, the Challenge Family has been supportive and “are likely to announce shortly that they will recognize us in an official capacity.” The ITU has also reportedly been receptive. On the World Triathlon Corporation, which operates all Ironman and 70.3 events, the group says that “at this moment in time they are not ready to add any additional commitment and procedure to their professional athlete infrastructure, however, they have been supportive and we look forward to building a strong relationship with them down the road.”

“Long distance triathlon has been a professional sport for over 30 years and while the amateur side has grown exponentially, it could be said that the professional arena hasn’t changed at all and if anything, has lost its footing and its aura,” New Zealand pro Dylan McNeice said in the press release. “Imagine where the sport could be, not just the professional side of things, but the sport in its entirety, if a Professional Triathlon Union had been up and running for the last 30 years! Let’s not get 30 years down the track and imagine the same thing. It is time the professionals did their part to help grow this incredible sport of ours, for themselves and for all stakeholders.”

Learn more about the group at Protriunion.com.

RELATED: Triathlete’s PROfiles

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Olympic Spots On The Line In Rio On Sunday http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/news/olympic-spots-on-the-line-in-rio-on-sunday_119942 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/news/olympic-spots-on-the-line-in-rio-on-sunday_119942#comments Wed, 29 Jul 2015 11:30:30 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=119942

Teammates Sarah True, Gwen Jorgensen and Katie Zaferes will battle it out for two available Olympics spots. Photo: Delly Carr/Triathlon.org

The bottom line for Americans is that a top-eight finish (with a maximum of two per gender) means a spot on the 2016 Olympic team.

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Teammates Sarah True, Gwen Jorgensen and Katie Zaferes will battle it out for two available Olympics spots. Photo: Delly Carr/Triathlon.org

The first opportunity for United States triathletes to qualify for the 2016 U.S. Olympic triathlon team is set for this Sunday at the 2015 Rio de Janeiro test event in Brazil. In terms of qualification, the bottom line for Americans is that a top-eight finish (with a maximum of two per gender) means a spot on the 2016 Olympic team.

American Women

Nine American women are on the start list for Sunday’s race, including Gwen Jorgensen, Katie Zaferes and Sarah True, who are currently ranked 1-2-3 in the Columbia Threadneedle ITU World Triathlon Series Rankings. Jorgensen, the reigning ITU World Champion and 2012 Olympian, has maintained a streak of 11 wins on the ITU World Triathlon Series, beginning in May 2014. Her 14 career WTS wins are nearly three times more than any other woman in series history, but qualifying for Rio 2016 is at the top of her to-do list.

Zaferes is seeking a spot on what would be her first Olympic team. In her third season as an elite triathlete, Zaferes has finished on the podium in five WTS events since March, with four silver medals and one bronze to her name. She recently finished sixth at WTS Hamburg on July 18. True, runner-up of the 2014 ITU World Championships and fourth-place finisher at the 2012 Olympic Games, is also eyeing one of the two top spots on Sunday. She missed the podium by one second in Hamburg, but she owns two medals this season and won her first WTS title less than a year ago in Stockholm.

Other American women on the start list are Lindsey Jerdonek, Kirsten Kasper, Renée Tomlin, Kaitlin Donner, Chelsea Burns and Erin Jones. Between them, these six women have earned five wins in ITU World Cup or Continental Cup events, five podium finishes in World Cup or Continental Cup events, and five top-10 finishes on the WTS circuit. The U.S. women have won a medal at all seven WTS events held this year, including two unprecedented podium sweeps, and have earned a medal in all but one ITU World Cup.

RELATED PHOTOS: American Women Sweep WTS London

American Men

The U.S. men are led by Kevin McDowell with his recent silver medal at the 2015 Pan American Games in Toronto on July 12. A top-eight finish for McDowell would mean his first Olympic team at the senior level after a Youth Olympic Games silver-medal performance in 2010. McDowell is joined by four other men on the start list who could also secure their first Olympic Games berth: Ben Kanute, Greg Billington, Joe Maloy and Tommy Zaferes. McDowell also has a bronze medal to his name this season from the Chengdu ITU World Cup, and Kanute owns the top finish for an American man in a WTS event after he finished ninth in Auckland.

Four-time Olympian Hunter Kemper and 2008 Olympian Jarrod Shoemaker are also on the start list for Sunday. Kemper has been the top-finishing American man at each of the four Olympic Games he has competed in and is no stranger to the challenges of Olympic qualification. Shoemaker cracked the top 10 at the WTS Grand Final in Edmonton last August, finishing seventh against a talented global field.

Other Story Lines To Follow

In the men’s race, it will be a battle of Olympic medalists Javier Gomez (ESP) and Alistair Brownlee (GBR) versus the up and comers like Mario Mola (ESP), Fernando Alarza (ESP), Richard Murray (RSA) and Vincent Luis (FRA).

Read the men’s preview at Triathlon.org.
See the complete men’s start list.

In the women’s race, the majority of the attention will be on the American trio of Jorgensen, Zaferes and True, but there are other strong names to follow. Look for Andrea Hewitt (NZL), Aileen Reid (IRL), Vicky Holland (GBR), Emma Moffatt (AUS), Jodie Stimpson (GBR), Non Stanford (GBR) and Flora Duffy (BER) to race hard with the goal of shaking up the podium.

Read the women’s preview at Triathlon.org.
See the complete women’s start list.

When and Where

The action takes place along Rio’s Copacabana Beach and Avenida Atlantica, with the elite event on Sunday, Aug. 2, to showcase top athletes competing on a 1,500-meter swim, 40-kilometer bike, 10-kilometer run course. The elite women are set to race at 8 a.m. ET (9 a.m. local time) on Aug. 2, with the elite men to follow at 11:30 a.m. ET (12:30 p.m. local time).

How To Follow

Live timing will be available at Triathlon.org/live, and U.S.-specific live updates will be shared at Twitter.com/usatlive. Additionally, highlights from the races will be shared in the ITU magazine show on Aug. 13. There will be no live video coverage of the event.

U.S. Qualification

Two spots per gender are available for Americans to automatically qualify for a spot on the 2016 U.S. Olympic Triathlon Team. A top-eight finish is required in order to secure a spot for Rio 2016 this weekend, and if three or more U.S. athletes finish in the top eight, only the top two will qualify. Visit Usatriathlon.org for a detailed guide on U.S. Olympic Triathlon Team qualification procedures.

RELATED: U.S. Olympic Qualification Guide

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4 Signs You Should Retire Your Running Shoes http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/gear-tech/4-signs-you-should-retire-your-running-shoes_119936 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/gear-tech/4-signs-you-should-retire-your-running-shoes_119936#comments Tue, 28 Jul 2015 20:08:23 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=119936

Photo: Scott Draper|Competitor.com

Running shoes don’t last forever, but you can’t necessarily follow the old adage that each pair will last 400 miles either.

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Photo: Scott Draper|Competitor.com

Running shoes don’t last forever, but you can’t necessarily follow the old adage that each pair will last 400 miles either. Running in old shoes can result in a variety of ailments as the shoe’s cushioning and structure breaks down, or trauma-related injuries (such as a bone bruise under the metatarsal heads) as the outsole wears thin.

1. The tread is showing significant wear in one or more sections of the outsole.
Once you’ve burned through the outer layer of rubber to the point there is no tread or where you can see the next layer of material, it’s time to get new shoes. (The wear-pattern is also an indication of your gait pattern, so if there is considerable wear on one side and little sign of wear on another, it could indicate that you’re imbalanced.)

RELATED: 8 Hot Running Shoe Trends For 2015

2. The footbed (aka the sockliner) of your shoes is frayed or worn thin in a certain area.

Most footbeds are rather flimsy and the friction caused from every footstrike will wear away the soft foam and thin layer of fabric over time. Damage to the footbed can result in a change in how the shoe fits, which can lead to slippage, blisters and hot spots during a run.

RELATED: How Often Should I Replace My Running Shoes?

3. The midsole of the shoe no longer looks the same or absorbs impact the way it used to.

You might notice this by feel, by sight or by manual manipulation. The bottom line is that the foam and plastic components in a midsole tend to get packed out and lose their resilience after a few hundred miles, resulting in a “dead” feeling underfoot, a deformed appearance or a shoe that’s entirely too pliable compared to what it used to be.

RELATED: Donate Your Running Shoes

4. The shoe’s upper or laces are showing significant signs of wear.
Materials used to build uppers are much more durable than they used to be—it’s doubtful you’ll be poking a hole through the end of the toe box. Normally, standard laces should outlast the life of your running shoes. So if your laces are stretched, frayed or you can’t seem to get them tight enough, it might be a good indication that you’ve run the life out of your shoes.

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Rio Paralympic Paratriathlon Test Event Set For Saturday http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/news/rio-paralympic-paratriathlon-test-event-set-for-saturday_119931 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/news/rio-paralympic-paratriathlon-test-event-set-for-saturday_119931#comments Tue, 28 Jul 2015 19:45:59 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=119931

Photo: Delly Carr/Triathlon.org

All of the paratriathlon sport classes will be contested at the Rio de Janeiro World Paratriathlon Event (WPE) on Saturday.

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Photo: Delly Carr/Triathlon.org

Alongside the Olympic Test Event, all of the paratriathlon sport classes will be contested at the Rio de Janeiro World Paratriathlon Event (WPE) on Saturday, Aug. 1, which dually serves as the Paralympic Test Event ahead of paratriathlon’s debut at the Paralympics in 2016. The Rio WPE race is just the second opportunity in a year-long campaign to score Paralympic Qualification Points.

Only select sport classes will be conducted at the 2016 Paralympic Games, which will be men’s PT1, PT2 and PT4 and women’s PT2, PT4 and PT5.

The paratriathlon races will take place on Saturday, Aug. 1 with the first classes going off at 9:00 am. See the links below for race start times in your timezone.

9:00  PT4/ PT2 Men & Women
12:15 PT1 Men & Women
13:45 PT3 Men & Women / PT5 B1 M & W
13:48:18 PT5 B2/3 Men
13:48:48 PT5 B2/3 Women

How to watch
Live timing will be offered for the paratriathlon races on Triathlon.org/live. The International Triathlon Union will also offer play-by-play updates on Twitter at @triathlonlive, as well as views of the race on Periscope at @worldtriathlon. While there will be no live broadcasts of the races, highlights will be included on the magazine show on Aug. 13 on Triathlonlive.tv.

Preview each class at Triathlon.org.

RELATED VIDEO: Paratriathlete Melissa Stockwell Looks Ahead To Rio

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Triathlete Love: Doublespeak http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/features/triathlete-love-doublespeak_119926 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/features/triathlete-love-doublespeak_119926#comments Tue, 28 Jul 2015 19:36:08 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=119926

What do those flowers really mean? Photo: Shutterstock.com

What your triathlete says and means are two different things.

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What do those flowers really mean? Photo: Shutterstock.com

What your triathlete says and means are two different things.

It’s taken five years and a combined 15 Ironman finishes, but I think my husband and I are finally speaking the same language.

Sure, the words coming out of our mouth are English, butlike most two-triathlete householdswe both know very well that what one person says isn’t to be taken at face value. There’s a hidden meaning behind every phrase, and it’s usually some variation of “I’m full of crap.”

RELATED – Triathlete Love: Moving In With Your Ironman? Have These 3 Conversations First

It’s not that anyone is lying, per se. I prefer to think of it as taking creative liberties with the truth. If Neil tells me he’s signed up for his fourth Ironman in one year, he’s basically bought a one-way ticket to the doghouse, because putting up with his grumpy ass for another training cycle does not appeal to me one bit. If he tells me we’re spending Thanksgiving in Cozumel, however, he knows he can slip a race in there with a little less grief (but only a little). Other white lies, half-truths, and tall tales of Triathlete Love:

“I got a membership at the tri shop. We’ll save 10 percent on every purchase!”
Translation: “I’m going to buy 40 percent more stuff!”

“I hear Kentucky is actually very romantic…”
Translation: “So there’s this race on our anniversary…”

“I got you flowers!”
Translation: “I totally signed up for that race on our anniversary.”

“It’s nice outside. Let’s go for a walk.”
Translation: “…to get some ice cream.”

“I’ll probably retire after this race.”
Translation: “I’m hoping you’ll forget I said this…again.”

“I’ll take care of it during the off-season.”
Translation: “Go ahead and hire someone to do it, ‘cause it ain’t happening otherwise.”

The bike mechanic was out of what I needed to fix my pedal.”
Translation: “So I told him to go ahead and replace the entire groupset.”

“Only one more hill, honey, then we’re done climbing!”
Translation: “There’s four more climbs, and you’re going to want to divorce me on the third one.”

“What do you say we have date night at the movies?”
Translation: “I’m probably going to fall asleep.”

“I should be home from my long ride around noon.”
Translation: “I’ll run out of spare tubes by 9 and call you to come pick me up 50 miles from home.”

“You don’t really need that, do you?”
Translation: “Your gear is better than mine, and I’m going to steal it.”

“Can we talk about this later?”
Translation: “I’m hangry. Can I please have a sandwich before I go into Hulk Mode?”

“Let’s snuggle on the couch.”
Translation: “My left glute is tight, and you’re about to massage it.”

“Don’t freak out, but…”
Translation: “I am calling you from an ambulance.”

“Have I told you lately how wonderful you are?”
Translation: “Oh, crap, you found the receipt from the tri shop.”

More “Triathlete Love” from Susan Lacke.

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DIY Dairy Alternatives http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/nutrition/diy-diary-alternatives_101825 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/nutrition/diy-diary-alternatives_101825#comments Tue, 28 Jul 2015 17:06:38 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=101825

Photo: John David Becker

Almonds, cashews, macadamia nuts, hazelnuts, hemp seeds, soybeans and oats can be liquefied with water and turned into plant-based milks.

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Photo: John David Becker


DIY alternatives to dairy for your morning oatmeal, post-workout smoothies and more.

If you can blend it, you can milk it. Almonds, cashews, macadamia nuts, hazelnuts, hemp seeds, soybeans and oats can all be liquefied with water and turned into plant-based milks.

“Blending up a variety of plant-based milks creates huge opportunity for nutrient diversity, as well as taste bud satisfaction,” says Tess Masters, author of The Blender Girl: Super-Easy, Super-Healthy Meals, Snacks, Desserts, and Drinks. “Homemade milks are delicious, and you can completely control the integrity of the product—the quality of the raw ingredients, the texture, flavor and sugar levels.”

RELATED: Dried Blueberry And Real Vanilla Bean Oatmeal Recipe

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The 3 Most Important Run Workouts For Triathletes http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/training/the-most-important-run-workouts-for-triathletes_88016 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/training/the-most-important-run-workouts-for-triathletes_88016#comments Tue, 28 Jul 2015 16:12:46 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=88016

Justin Daerr on the way to the Ironman Boulder win in 2014. Photo: Nick Morales

Coach Justin Daerr has found that three basic sessions hold the hierarchy: the long run, the transition run and the fartlek/speed run.

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Justin Daerr on the way to the Ironman Boulder win in 2014. Photo: Nick Morales

Dear coach: What are the most important run workouts to do every week?

I have found that three basic sessions hold the hierarchy: the long run, the transition run and the fartlek/speed run.

The Long Run

This session makes up the basic foundation of any Ironman/long-course run program, but its importance does not fall by the wayside as the race distance decreases. Long runs build stamina and durability and help you maintain good form under fatigue.

Preferably, long runs should take place over semisoft surfaces (such as dirt roads or well-packed trails) and should build in quality as your fitness improves. You should begin these runs feeling fairly comfortable and eventually make your way to an intensity level where conversation is possible.

RELATED: Determining Your Long Training Run For Any Triathlon Distance

The Transition Run

Most working athletes are time-limited, and getting in numerous sessions in the week can be a challenging task. With this in mind, strive to run off the bike on your key cycling workout days to help increase run frequency while developing the skill of running off the bike with ease.

For the athletes I work with, we establish a baseline transition run duration of 15 minutes. It is simple, easy and highly effective when done consistently over time. If time permits, an athlete can extend these sessions to help with race pacing and execution. However, as little as 15 minutes done repeatedly through the week helps athletes achieve high run frequency even if the overall run volume is moderate.

RELATED: How Often Should You Run After Riding?

The Fartlek/Speed Run

This refers to runs that are often classified as higher intensity. I put this one last because I do believe that this should be done to complement the overall run program as opposed to being considered the most important.

Begin with sessions that are built around time/duration and not on a fixed distance or pace. As fitness improves, workouts can be formalized with distance repeats at a set pace. Forcing high paces too early can often put you at risk for injury with little additional upside in fitness. The key is to train with the fitness that you have, and not the fitness that you want.

RELATED: 9 Ways To Fartlek

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One-Hour Workout: Quick Pyramid Brick http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/training/one-hour-workout-quick-pyramid-brick_119916 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/training/one-hour-workout-quick-pyramid-brick_119916#comments Tue, 28 Jul 2015 11:30:12 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=119916

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Need to get in a solid brick session, but feel limited on time? Try this fast-paced workout from coach Tony Zamora.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

Every Tuesday we’ll feature a different coach’s workout you can complete in 60 minutes (or less!).

This week’s brick workout comes from Tony Zamora, the founder of TZCoaching based in Oak Park, Ill. “This workout is great for when you’re limited on time, and need to get in a solid brick session,” Zamora says. “It’s best done in a gym with a treadmill and indoor bike trainer, or you can set up your bike on a trainer by a track. I like this workout because it mixes up intensities, time and distances. It makes the hour go by fast, while building up your legs to get ready for longer brick sessions.”

RELATED: 6 Quick Brick Tricks

Pyramid Brick Workout

Warm-up
10 min easy on the bike, increasing effort each minute

Main Set:
3-min bike at 90% or more.
Run ¼ mile at 5K pace

4-min bike at 90%
Run ½ mile at 5K pace

5-min bike at 80–90%
Run 1 mile at 5K pace

4-min bike at 90%
Run ½ mile at 5K pace

3-min bike at 90% or more
Run ¼ mile at 5K pace

Cool-down:
5 min easy spin. Cadence should be over 100 RPM.

More one-hour workouts.

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TriathlEats: Gnocchi With Sausage And Peas http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/nutrition/triathleats-gnocchi-with-sausage-and-peas_119910 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/nutrition/triathleats-gnocchi-with-sausage-and-peas_119910#comments Mon, 27 Jul 2015 21:44:47 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=119910

Gnocchi With Sausage And Peas. Photo: Grant Dotson

Reward a long training day with this simple one-pan, carb-rich dish.

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Gnocchi With Sausage And Peas. Photo: Grant Dotson


Reward a long training day with this simple one-pan, carb-rich dish.

Ingredients
40 gnocchi
½ pound of Italian sausage
¾ cup green peas
(frozen is fine)
4 T butter
4 T cream
Salt and pepper, to taste
Parmesan cheese, for garnish
Fresh mint leaves, for garnish

Directions
Heat a large sauté pan over medium heat and brown the sausage. Pieces should be about the size of a penny. Remove the sausage with a slotted spoon and place on a plate. Turn the heat up to medium-high. Sear the gnocchi in the sausage fat that was left in the pan. Brown the gnocchi on one side and flip over, then add peas, heating them through. Remove from the heat. Add the sausage back to the pan with the butter and cream, stirring constantly. When the butter has melted and you have one unified sauce coating the gnocchi, peas and sausage, season with salt and pepper to taste and then portion onto two plates. Using a peeler, grate ribbons of Parmesan over the top. Scatter on a few fresh mint leaves, and serve. Serves 2.

Chef’s Tip
If you want to “chef the dish up” a bit, purée blanched peas with a handful of basil, water to thin it out and a squeeze of lemon juice (then strain) to make a pea sauce that you can drizzle over the top for an added pop of color and flavor.

RELATED RECIPE: Sweet Potato Gnocchi With Warm Sage And Shallot Oil

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First 2015 Kona Pro Slots To Be Handed Out This Week http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/news/first-2015-kona-pro-slots-to-be-handed-out-this-week_119896 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/news/first-2015-kona-pro-slots-to-be-handed-out-this-week_119896#comments Mon, 27 Jul 2015 20:43:03 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=119896

Bahrain Endurance Team members Jan Frodeno and Daniela Ryf top the rankings and will be among the favorites on the Kona start line. Photo: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image

A total of 47 men and 35 women will be offered spots to Oct. 10's Ironman World Championship as part of the July qualifying group.

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Bahrain Endurance Team members Jan Frodeno and Daniela Ryf top the rankings and will be among the favorites on the Kona start line. Photo: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image


With the 2015 Ironman World Championship 74 days away, the first professional spots for the men and women will be handed out this week.

The Kona Pro Rankings (KPR) system was put into place in the fall of 2010 and requires professionals to be ranked against each other based on their finishes at 70.3 and Ironman events around the world. The top ranked 50 men and 35 women in the standings earn starts at the iconic race. Several athletes are considered automatic qualifiers and don’t count in the overall rankings. Athletes who have won the Ironman World Championship in the last five years earn spots in Kona, as long as they validate their start with a finish at an Ironman event in the qualifying period. New for 2015, the winners of the regional championship races (Ironman Asia-Pacific Championship, Ironman African Championship, Ironman North American Championship, Ironman Latin American Championship and the Ironman European Championship) also earned automatic Kona spots.

This week marks the end of the first qualifying period, and 40 men and 28 women, plus the automatic qualifiers, will be offered the opportunity to register given that they have validated. If a person has not validated or chooses not to accept his/her slot, it will roll down to the next eligible athlete. The remaining 17 spots (10 men and seven women) will be handed out at the end of August.

Automatic Qualifiers

Sebastian Kienle (GER), Frederik Van Lierde (BEL) and Pete Jacobs (AUS) have each won the Ironman World Championship in the last five years and have all validated with an Ironman finish. Craig Alexander and Chris McCormack (AUS) are also eligible for spots based on their Ironman World Championship wins, but they have not validated and have both said they don’t have any intention of competing this year. Canada’s Jeffrey Symonds (Ironman Asia-Pacific champion), the United States’ Matthew Hanson (Ironman North America champion), Germany’s Jan Frodeno (Ironman European champion) and Belgian’s Marino Vanhoenacker (Ironman Latin American champion) have all earned automatic qualifying spots based on their regional championship wins. Vanhoenacker said at the end of last year’s Ironman World Championship that he would not return to the Big Island to compete, but revealed after his Latin American Championship win that he has yet to make a final decision on a Kona start.

For the women, Mirinda Carfrae (AUS) and Leanda Cave (GBR) are automatic qualifiers and have validated. Chrissie Wellington (GBR) is also still an automatic qualifier based on Kona wins, but has retired from the sport and will not be competing. Australia’s Melissa Hauschildt (Ironman Asia-Pacific champion), Great Britain’s Jodie Swallow (Ironman African champion), Canada’s Angela Naeth (Ironman North American champion), Brazil’s Ariane Monticeli (Ironman Latin American champion) and Switzerland’s Daniela Ryf (Ironman European champion) all earned automatic qualifying spots.

RELATED PHOTOS: Ironman Announces New Start Times For World Championships

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Swim Vocabulary Made Simple http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/training/swim-vocabulary-made-simple_10306 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/training/swim-vocabulary-made-simple_10306#comments Mon, 27 Jul 2015 20:35:47 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=10306

Photo: Nils Nilsen

Swimming technique, balance, body position and hip rotation are important elements of the freestyle swim stroke.

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Photo: Nils Nilsen

The freestyle swim stroke has several subtle parts that make up the whole. Each swim coach, program or athlete has a different way of explaining each of these small parts. Sometimes it’s confusing when different vocabulary is used to describe one part of the stroke.

Swimming technique, balance, body position and hip rotation are important elements of the freestyle swim stroke. A coach might critique your balance in the water but praise your hip rotation; or she might try to tweak your body position and ignore your balance. It is important to understand what each term means so you can make improvements.

First is balance. Your upper body and your legs should share the effort of moving you through the water. Specifically, your arms should make a 50 percent to 70 percent contribution to your forward propulsion while your legs should account for the remaining 50 percent to 30 percent. Swimmers who drag their legs behind their body, with almost no visible kick, are missing out on the potential core power that is derived from the hips. On the other hand, if your legs are tiring long before your upper body, consider lessening your kick to conserve energy. By swimming with a two- or four-beat beat kick (meaning you complete two or four individual kicks per complete arm stroke cycle), athletes can benefit from the power in their legs without tiring too quickly.

Balance in the water also means having the movement of the stroke come easily and naturally. A swimmer with good balance is not fighting the water; she is efficiently working with the water, gravity and her own body. Both sides of her body are making similar movements. And yes, balanced swimming requires bilateral breathing.

In terms of body position, try to maintain a constant position during the entire stroke cycle. Strive for a horizontal position in the water with your face pointing toward the bottom of the pool and your hips near the surface of the water. You can practice floating with a snorkel or streamline kicking to become comfortable in this position. Your position is good if your feet break the surface of the water with each kick.

RELATED: 3 Ways To Improve Your Swim Posture

Next, try to keep your body position in a straight line. Think about being “skewered” from the top of your head, through your neck and down your spine. You can rotate on this skewer but you cannot move any part of your body laterally. Drag and resistance are minimized with a streamlined position.

Finally, there is the fine art of hip rotation, which actually refers to shoulder, torso and hip rotation. To understand rotation correctly, you must first recognize “disconnect.” Rotation occurs from the middle of the neck to the middle of the thigh. The head and legs are disconnected from the rotation. When the hips, torso and shoulders are maximally rotated 45 degrees to the left or right in the water, your head and legs should maintain a horizontal position. This allows your kick to keep a steady beat at the surface of the water and it keeps your head still at the front of the stroke.

Your breathing is also disconnected from hip rotation. Breathe by rotating your neck just enough to get one goggle and your mouth out of the water. While taking a breath, don’t forget that you have been “skewered.” Head movement should be minimal and should not affect your balance, body position or hip rotation.

RELATED: Learn To Love The Pool (Really!)

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Ironman To Test Splitting Male And Female Pro Fields In 2016 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/news/ironman-to-test-splitting-male-and-female-pro-fields-in-2016_119617 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/news/ironman-to-test-splitting-male-and-female-pro-fields-in-2016_119617#comments Mon, 27 Jul 2015 14:56:14 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=119617

Next year's Ironman Lake Placid race will feature a female professional field. Photo: Gani Pinero/Endurapix

Three races will feature only females in the professional field, with three different races featuring only males in the professional field.

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Next year's Ironman Lake Placid race will feature a female professional field. Photo: Gani Pinero/Endurapix

Ironman Lake Placid, Ironman Wisconsin and Ironman 70.3 Augusta will feature female professionals, while Ironman Canada, Ironman Chattanooga and Ironman 70.3 Santa Cruz to feature male professionals.

Ironman today announced a change in race structure for select Ironman and 70.3 events in North America during the 2016 race season. Three races will feature only females in the professional field, with three different races featuring only males in the professional field. Ironman Lake Placid (July 24), Ironman Wisconsin (Sept. 11) and Ironman 70.3 Augusta (Sept. 25) will include all female professional fields, while Ironman Canada (July 24), Ironman 70.3 Santa Cruz (Sept. 11) and Ironman Chattanooga (Sept. 25) will include all male professional fields.

According to the press release, the selection of these races was based on the dates on which they are held and the overall qualifying schedule to ensure both genders have the opportunity to compete in a race on the same weekend. A race that hosts a female only professional race will be countered by a race on the same day which holds a male only professional race.

“We are always looking for ways to improve our events. Guided by professional athlete feedback which was shared with Women For Tri board for further dialogue, we are taking this important step in the next progression of competitive racing,” said Andrew Messick, Chief Executive Officer for Ironman, in the announcement. “We are excited to try this pilot in 2016 and provide our female and male pros a unique racing experience, and a platform for each athlete field to shine. We hope to see an amazing professional line up and outstanding competition at these races.”

“I think that this change for 2016 is a great step forward for female professional triathletes and I am pleased that Ironman is implementing new ways to highlight their female pros,” said reigning and three-time Ironman world champion Mirinda Carfrae in the press release. “Women will be the first ones into the water and out on the course—this will help eliminate many of the crossover issues pro women face racing between the pro men and age-group athletes.”

Multiple Kona podium finisher Rachel Joyce was also optimistic about the new strategy. “I think this has the potential to be a very positive move for the women’s professional race and for Ironman racing more generally,” she said in a statement to Triathlete.com. “This gives the women professionals the opportunity to start first. I hope the time gap to the age group start will be such that women professionals will experience a fair race without influence from the age group fields. Having a woman break the finish line tape first is a huge deal. I haven’t seen that in Ironman racing during my career! A great move by Ironman in my eyes.”

“It also means more races will include a professional race next year, which I see as something that will add to the age group experience,” she continued. “I know when I raced as an age grouper I wanted to see what the pros did racing the same course as me in the same day, then hear about the race through their eyes.”

Below are schedule changes for the 2016 North American Season:

All Female Professional Field
Ironman Lake Placid – July 24, 2016
Ironman Wisconsin – Sept. 11, 2016
Ironman 70.3 Augusta – Sept. 25, 20126

All Male Professional Field
Ironman Canada – July 24, 2016
Ironman 70.3 Santa Cruz – Sept. 11, 2016
Ironman Chattanooga – Sept. 25, 2016

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Photos: 2015 Special Olympics World Games Triathlon http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/photos/photos-2015-special-olympics-world-games-triathlon_119680 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/photos/photos-2015-special-olympics-world-games-triathlon_119680#comments Mon, 27 Jul 2015 12:54:47 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=119680

For the first time in its 47-year history, the Special Olympics World Games included triathlon as part of its lineup.

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Photos: Rich Cruse/Crusephoto.com

For the first time in its 47-year history, the Special Olympics World Games included triathlon as part of its lineup. The half-mile swim, 11-mile bike and 3-mile run took place in Long Beach, Calif. with a big crowd of spectators and media looking on. Seventeen-year-old Noah Dellas, a New Jersey native who is a member of Team USA, was the first athlete to cross the finish line, greeted by his coach Lisa Rumer. Uruguay’s Florencia Barranque won gold for the women, with Americans Amy Doctor and Courtney Dreyfus rounding out the podium. As part of the Unified Sports Experience, a program that pairs high-level athletes or celebrities with Special Olympics athletes, pros Heather Jackson and Sarah Haskins took part on relay teams for the event.

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Video: A Core Stability Exercise http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/training/monday-minute-stability-ball-roll-out_4155 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/07/training/monday-minute-stability-ball-roll-out_4155#comments Mon, 27 Jul 2015 12:44:48 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/2011/08/videos/monday-minute-stability-ball-roll-out_5055

The stability ball roll out will teach your core to resist over-extension and support your entire body.

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This week we learn a great core stability exercise that utilizes a large stability ball. The stability ball roll out teaches your core to resist over-extension and support your entire body.

RELATED EXERCISE: Stability Ball Push-Up

More 60-second strengthening and stretching videos.

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