Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com Triathlon Training, Gear, Nutrition, Photos, Race Results & Calendars Mon, 02 May 2016 21:04:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.3.1 Have A Training Question? Check Out “Dear Coach” http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/05/training/training-question-check-dear-coach_95935 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/05/training/training-question-check-dear-coach_95935#comments Mon, 02 May 2016 19:30:55 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=95935

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Top triathlon coaches from around the country answer your triathlon questions.

The post Have A Training Question? Check Out “Dear Coach” appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
The post Have A Training Question? Check Out “Dear Coach” appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/05/training/training-question-check-dear-coach_95935/feed 0
How To Be A Well-Fueled Machine http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/05/nutrition/how-to-be-a-well-fueled-machine_131345 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/05/nutrition/how-to-be-a-well-fueled-machine_131345#comments Mon, 02 May 2016 16:55:11 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=131345

Illustration by Caitlin Alexander

See if your fueling strategy (or lack thereof) is affecting your performance and health goals.

The post How To Be A Well-Fueled Machine appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>

Feel better and go faster with the right nutrition strategy.

The primary goal of your diet as an athlete is to provide the body with the necessary energy and nutrients to support your training and healthy lifestyle. If your body is not well fueled, you won’t meet your performance goals and you may be compromising your health. It’s critical that you embrace an eating style that is nutritionally smart but also sustainable. Consider these five common nutritional concerns to see if your fueling strategy (or lack thereof) is affecting your performance and health goals.

Note that the following information should help you decide if you need to speak to your doctor about current health concerns and/or work with a board-certified sports dietitian to identify the best strategies to meet your energy, health and performance needs.

I have no time to cook

Everyone has heard that you cannot out-train a poorly planned diet, yet far too many athletes put way more time and energy into training compared to healthy eating. Meal planning, grocery shopping and cooking are not nearly as fun as riding your bike for three hours, but it’s counterproductive to be devoted to your training plan but nonchalant about what you eat.

We all know what happens to your mood and food choices when you go into a meal or workout hungry. Considering that your training intensity and volume will increase throughout the season, thus leaving less time and energy for meal prepping, it’s important to find ways to eat healthy even when you think you have no time (or don’t like) to cook.

Some simple guidelines:
– Meal planning is the foundation of a healthy diet. Plan your meals and snacks, grocery shop, then prep. Eating is much easier, healthier and affordable in this order.
– Batch cooking is a game-changer for athletes. Why cook one chicken breast when you can cook five? Instead of making one salad a day for lunch, create a salad bar of ingredients in your fridge and pantry for easy meal prep.
– Consider a meal planning or food delivery service to ensure that healthy eating is not an afterthought.
– Select a theme meal—e.g., meatless Monday, taco Tuesday—each night of the week to make planning and shopping easy.
– Simplify the meal to include at least four healthy components: plants, protein, starch/grain and fat. Whether it’s two slices of bread with scrambled eggs and sautéed spinach and mushrooms, or wild rice with tempeh or beef with sautéed mixed root veggies, you’ve covered the basics.

RELATED: Eat Healthy At Home, Even With A Hectic Schedule

The post How To Be A Well-Fueled Machine appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/05/nutrition/how-to-be-a-well-fueled-machine_131345/feed 0
Upper-Body Strength Exercise: Assisted Pull-Up http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/05/training/monday-minute-assisted-pull-up-5_65904 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/05/training/monday-minute-assisted-pull-up-5_65904#comments Mon, 02 May 2016 16:10:21 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=65904

Noted triathlon coach Tim Crowley shows us the assisted pull-up, a terrific old-school upper body strengthening exercise with a twist.

The post Upper-Body Strength Exercise: Assisted Pull-Up appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
In this video, noted triathlon coach Tim Crowley shows us the assisted pull-up, a terrific old-school upper body strengthening exercise with a twist.

More “Monday Minute” exercises.

The post Upper-Body Strength Exercise: Assisted Pull-Up appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/05/training/monday-minute-assisted-pull-up-5_65904/feed 0
Photos: 2016 Ironman Australia http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/05/photos/photos-2016-ironman-australia_131302 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/05/photos/photos-2016-ironman-australia_131302#comments Sun, 01 May 2016 14:57:29 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=131302

Tim Reed and Beth Gerdes were the winners on a rainy day of racing at Ironman Australia.

The post Photos: 2016 Ironman Australia appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
$(document).ready(function() { $(".fancybox").fancybox({type: 'image', margin : [20, 60, 20, 60]}); });

Australia’s Tim Reed had to dig deeper than before to claim his maiden Ironman victory at Ironman Australia in Port Macquarie today. In the women’s race, American Beth Gerdes turned in an impressive 2:56:10 marathon to run her way to her second Ironman victory.
Read the race recap here.

The post Photos: 2016 Ironman Australia appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/05/photos/photos-2016-ironman-australia_131302/feed 0
Photos: 2016 Wildflower Long Course Triathlon http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/05/photos/photos-2016-wildflower-long-course-triathlon_131261 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/05/photos/photos-2016-wildflower-long-course-triathlon_131261#comments Sun, 01 May 2016 14:17:31 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=131261

Americans Jesse Thomas and Liz Lyles were impressive at the 34th running of the Wildflower Long Course Triathlon.

The post Photos: 2016 Wildflower Long Course Triathlon appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
$(document).ready(function() { $(".fancybox").fancybox({type: 'image', margin : [20, 60, 20, 60]}); });

American Jesse Thomas earned his sixth-straight win, while fellow American Liz Lyles started a streak of her own by defending her 2015 title at the 34th running of the Wildflower Long Course Triathlon.

Thomas managed a 26:14 swim, a 2:18:27 bike, and a race-best 1:17:01 combined run split. Lyles came out of the swim at 29:41, had the fastest bike split for the women at 2:41:13, and backed it up with a combined 1:27:21 run (which also happened to be the fastest in the women’s field).

Read the race recap here.

The post Photos: 2016 Wildflower Long Course Triathlon appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/05/photos/photos-2016-wildflower-long-course-triathlon_131261/feed 0
Tim Reed, Beth Gerdes Spectacular At Ironman Australia http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/05/news/tim-reed-beth-gerdes-spectacular-ironman-australia_131257 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/05/news/tim-reed-beth-gerdes-spectacular-ironman-australia_131257#comments Sun, 01 May 2016 13:46:34 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=131257

Beth Gerdes earns her second Ironman victory. Photo: Delly Carr/Ironman

Both Tim Reed and Beth Gerdes ran their way to the top of the top of the Ironman Australia podium.

The post Tim Reed, Beth Gerdes Spectacular At Ironman Australia appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Australia’s Tim Reed had to dig deeper than before to claim his maiden Ironman victory at Ironman Australia in Port Macquarie today. In the women’s race, American Beth Gerdes turned in an impressive 2:56:10 marathon to run her way to her second Ironman victory.

RELATED PHOTOS: 2016 Ironman Australia

Read the recaps from Ironman below.

Men’s Race
Reed was greeted by family and friends after his come-from-behind win, made more challenging with the passing of one of his closest friends this week.

“I had something to fight for today. I lost a really great friend and he was coming up to watch me. I gave it everything for him,” said an emotional Reed.

The 31-year-old is one of the world’s premier triathletes over the Ironman 70.3 distance, as the current Asia-Pacific champion and with a bundle of victories around the globe. But so far the Ironman has proven a step too far.

Today he ran down an 8:24 deficit to fellow Australian Clayton Fettell on a wet afternoon in Port Macquarie, winning in 8:16:29, with his missing friend never far from his mind nor the support from his family.

“It is not about the sacrifice that I make but my wife puts up with a pro athlete then there’s my family, my friends and my training partners, there are just so many people behind this performance. I owe it all to them.”

He finished nearly six minutes clear of Queensland’s David Dellow with Fettell, who fought so bravely in a day spent mostly on his own at the front of the race, finishing third seven minutes behind the winner.

Fettell and Josh Amberger led out of the swim before Fettell took his chances on the first lap of the bike. He opened a six-minute buffer after the first lap and took an 8:24 advantage on to the run.

Reed started to make inroads from the get-go and by mid-race the outcome was clear, although Fettell hung on, finishing third after David Dellow responded with a powerful second half of the run to earn second.

Women’s Race
The women’s race followed similar lines with defending champion Michelle Bremer, the Australian-based New Zealander, seemingly impregnable as she opened a lead of 12:38 off the 180km bike.

Gerdes, a noted runner who went sub three hours for the marathon to finish fourth in Western Australia in 2014, gradually chipping away at the lead. She took four minutes from the lead after 16kms but as Bremer began to slow, then Gerdes pounced, finally overtaking the Kiwi after the 36km mark.

On the back of a 2:55 marathon, Gerdes claimed the win in 9:12:25. It backs up her victory in Switzerland last year although for a long time today she did not think it possible.

“I thought I would not catch Michelle but I never gave up,” said Gerdes who lives much of the year in Australia with fiancé Luke Mckenzie. “I’ve done all of the Ironman races in Australia but this is the first one I’ve won so that’s special.

“With the weather the run was more like a Tough Mudder than a marathon but that was fun.”

New Zealand’s Gina Crawford led out of the swim but Bremer pushed through to the lead early on the bike, extending her advantage to seven minutes after the first lap and over 12 minutes on to the run. Gerdes whittled away until the final quarter of the race when Bremer faded and the American took the lead.

2016 Ironman Australia
Port Macquarie, Australia – May 1, 2016
2.4-mile swim, 112-mile bike, 26.2-mile run

Men
1. Tim Reed (AUS) 8:16:34
2. David Dellow (AUS) 8:22:18
3. Clayton Fettell (AUS) 8:23:22
4. Michael Fox (AUS) 8:26:12
5. Dougal Allan (NZL) 8:29:15

Women
1. Beth Gerdes (USA) 9:10:27
2. Michelle Bremer (NZL) 9:13:33
3. Dimity-Lee Duke (AUS) 9:42:15
4. Melanie Burke (NZL) 9:56:53
5. Tamsyn Hayes (NZL) 10:07:40

Complete results

The post Tim Reed, Beth Gerdes Spectacular At Ironman Australia appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/05/news/tim-reed-beth-gerdes-spectacular-ironman-australia_131257/feed 0
Thomas Gets 6th Straight Win, Lyles Repeats At Wildflower http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/news/thomas-gets-6th-straight-win-lyles-repeats-at-wildflower_131252 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/news/thomas-gets-6th-straight-win-lyles-repeats-at-wildflower_131252#comments Sat, 30 Apr 2016 23:15:17 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=131252

Jesse Thomas makes it six in a row. Photo: Kaori Funahashi/@kaoriphoto

Jesse Thomas earned his sixth-straight win, while Liz Lyles started a streak of her own by defending her 2015 title.

The post Thomas Gets 6th Straight Win, Lyles Repeats At Wildflower appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
American Jesse Thomas earned his sixth-straight win, while fellow American Liz Lyles started a streak of her own by defending her 2015 title at the 34th running of the Wildflower Long Course Triathlon.

Thomas managed a 26:14 swim, a 2:18:27 bike, and a race-best 1:17:01 combined run split. Lyles came out of the swim at 29:41, had the fastest bike split for the women at 2:41:13, and backed it up with a combined 1:27:21 run (which also happened to be the fastest in the women’s field).

RELATED PHOTOS: 2016 Wildflower Long Course Triathlon

Men’s Race
Race morning offered sunny skies and cool breezes as the elite men lined up to start the day. At 25:16 after the gun went off, Thomas Roos (USA) exited the water followed by Alexander Schilling (DEN) at 25:47. Following these two solo athletes was a pack of eight (including Thomas), all within 10 seconds of each other. By the end of the 2-mile run to transition though, Thomas had taken the lead and began the bike in front.

Out on the bike, course record holder Terrenzo Bozzone (NZL) and Jason Pederson (USA) took the lead from Thomas. Around the 20-mile mark, the three had a 1:30 lead on fourth (American Matt Lieto) and fifth (American Ben Collins). Thomas, finding some extra power in his legs, overtook Bozzone and Pederson to earn the lead before the top of the infamous Nasty Grade and held his lead into T2.

Bozzone caught Thomas heading into T2 and by mile one of the run, he and Thomas were running shoulder to shoulder. Soon though, the 6:40 average pace began to wear on Bozzone and Thomas pulled away to take the victory with nearly a three-minute buffer. Bozzone finished second. Chris Lieferman (USA) took third, followed by Chris Baird (USA) in fourth and Matt Russel (USA) in fifth.

Women’s Race
The women’s swim was fairly spread out, with Lauren Goss (USA) and Emily Cocks (USA) exiting the water over two minutes on Laurel Wassner (USA) and nearly three minutes ahead of Lyles. On the bike, the women initially spread out until Cocks and Lyles reached the bottom of Nasty Grade side by side. Here, Lyles pulled away up the grade to build a 1:30 lead over Wassner, while Cocks started to lose some ground. Lyles led the women into T2, with Wassner and Cocks battling for second and third as they exited transition. Out on the course, Lyles only continued to lengthen her lead. At the finish, Lyles enjoyed nearly a six-minute lead over Wassner (4:48:42), thankful to avoid another dramatic sprint finish as she did last year with pro Heather Jackson. Cocks ended up taking third in 4:51:33, and Robin Pomeroy (USA) and Lauren Goss rounded out the top five.

With the drought greatly affecting much of California, Wildflower continues to be a swim, run, bike, run. While many don’t seem to enjoy this type of race at much, two-time winner Liz Lyles claims something different: “I love running as fast as I can that first bit, it’s almost like it’s just a long T1.”

2016 Wildflower Long Course Triathlon
Lake San Antonio, Calif. – April 30, 2016
1.2-mile swim, 2.2-mile run to T1, 56-mile bike, 10.9-mile run

Men
1. Jesse Thomas (USA) 4:05:32
2. Tereno Bozzone (NZL) 4:08:17
3. Chris Leiferman (USA) 4:10:36
4. Chris Baird (USA) 4:11:17
5. Matthew Russell (USA) 4:12:54

Women
1. Liz Lyles (USA) 4:42:17
2. Laurel Wassner (USA) 4:48:42
3. Emily Cocks (USA) 4:51:33
4. Robin Pomeroy (USA) 4:57:47
5. Lauren Goss (USA) 4:59:43

Complete results

The post Thomas Gets 6th Straight Win, Lyles Repeats At Wildflower appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/news/thomas-gets-6th-straight-win-lyles-repeats-at-wildflower_131252/feed 0
Nutrition On Long Bike Rides http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/nutrition/triathlon-nutrition-nutrition-on-long-bike-rides_75940 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/nutrition/triathlon-nutrition-nutrition-on-long-bike-rides_75940#comments Fri, 29 Apr 2016 17:18:04 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=75940

Photo: Kurt Hoy

With the warmer weather finally here, I’m taking my long rides outside. How should I be approaching my on-the-bike hydration?

The post Nutrition On Long Bike Rides appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Q: With the warmer weather finally here, I’m taking my long rides outside. How should I be approaching my on-the-bike hydration?

A: The first step is to assess your fluid needs. Test and know your sweat rate (the average is 24–32 ounces an hour, or at least one bottle per hour), then determine how much fluid you will need to carry for a race. Find out the specifics for your race; for example, sprint tris often do not supply fluid on the bike course, so you’ll need to carry your own. Olympic-distance races may have one, two (or no) bottle refill stations, so you’ll need to carry enough fluid to either complete your race, or make it between aid stations.

Next, address your bike frame size and setup to determine how much fluid you can hold and where you can stash it. For example, my tri bike can only hold one bottle cage on my downtube; larger bikes can hold two. Aerobars allow for front-mount bottles you can reach and drink while staying in the aero position. Rear-mount bottles allow for “easy reach” when in the aero position, provided you feel comfortable reaching behind you while riding. Regardless of which you choose, I’d recommend one bottle of plain water to drink with gels, bars and chews, and one to two bottles of sports drink (with 50–70 calories and 200mg sodium per 8 ounces). I advise my athletes to rely mostly on their sports drink (for fluid, calories and sodium in each gulp) and add extra water once calorie needs are reached or in excessive heat conditions for those with higher fluid volume needs. Just be sure to have your hydration setup and plan ironed out before you race.

Clinical nutritionist and certified sports dietitian Lauren Antonucci is the owner/director of Nutrition Energy in New York City.

RELATED: Practicing Triathlon Nutrition Indoors

Get the latest in triathlon training, gear, nutrition and news sent straight to your inbox. Sign up for Triathlete’s newsletter.  

The post Nutrition On Long Bike Rides appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/nutrition/triathlon-nutrition-nutrition-on-long-bike-rides_75940/feed 0
2016 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide: Race Kits http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/gear-tech/2016-triathlete-buyers-guide-race-kits-2_131247 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/gear-tech/2016-triathlete-buyers-guide-race-kits-2_131247#comments Fri, 29 Apr 2016 14:19:09 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=131247

We review the latest race kit options for men and women—all designed to help you look and feel your best on race day.

The post 2016 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide: Race Kits appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
The post 2016 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide: Race Kits appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/gear-tech/2016-triathlete-buyers-guide-race-kits-2_131247/feed 0
Quick Set Friday: Climb The 4x Ladder http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/training/quick-set-friday-climb-4x-ladder_99474 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/training/quick-set-friday-climb-4x-ladder_99474#comments Fri, 29 Apr 2016 14:00:01 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=99474

Photo: Shutterstock.com

A creative swim workout from Triathlete contributor and swimming all-star Sara McLarty.

The post Quick Set Friday: Climb The 4x Ladder appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Triathlete contributor and swimming all-star Sara McLarty has a blog with more than 500 creative workouts used in her Masters swim program in Clermont, Fla. We’ll feature a workout every Friday so you have new ideas to take to the pool. On her blog (Mastersswimworkoutsbysaramclarty.blogspot.com), you can pick a Monday set for a long distance focus, a Wednesday set for sprint training, or Friday for creative open water skills.

A:
200 swim/100 kick
12×25 @ :40 w/band only
8×50 swim @ :45 (descend 1-4, 5-8)
100 easy (reverse IM drill)
(do the following sets continuous, no extra rest, all swim freestyle)
4×25 @ :30
4×50 @ :50
4×75 @ 1:10
4×100 @ 1:25
4×125 @ 1:45
4×150 @ 2:05
4×175 @ 2:20
4×200 @ 2:40
200 cool-down
*4900 total*

RELATED – Ask Coach Sara: Fear Of Being Trampled

B:
200 swim/100 kick
8×25 @ :60 w/band only
4×50 swim @ :55 (descend 1-4)
100 easy swim
(do the following sets continuous, no extra rest, all swim freestyle)
4×25 @ :30
4×50 @ :60
4×75 @ 1:20
4×100 @ 1:50
4×125 @ 2:10
4×150 @ 2:40
4×175 @ 3:10
200 cool-down
*3800 total*

RELATED – Ask Coach Sara: The Best Pool Sessions

C:
200 swim/100 kick
4×25 w/ :30 rest w/band only
4×50 swim w/ :20 rest (descend 1-4)
100 easy swim
(do the following sets continuous, no extra rest, all swim freestyle)
4×25 w/ :10 rest
4×50 w/ :15 rest
4×75 w/ :20 rest
4×100 w/ :25 rest
4×125 w/ :30 rest
*2400 total*

More swim workouts from Sara McLarty.

The post Quick Set Friday: Climb The 4x Ladder appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/training/quick-set-friday-climb-4x-ladder_99474/feed 0
Ironman Announces 3 2018 70.3 World Championship Location Finalists http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/news/ironman-announces-3-2018-70-3-world-championship-location-finalists_131242 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/news/ironman-announces-3-2018-70-3-world-championship-location-finalists_131242#comments Fri, 29 Apr 2016 13:55:38 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=131242

Budapest, Hungary. Photo: Shutterstock.com

Nice (France), Budapest (Hungary) and Port Elizabeth, Nelson Mandela Bay (South Africa) are the three finalists.

The post Ironman Announces 3 2018 70.3 World Championship Location Finalists appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Ironman today announced the finalists for the 2018 Ironman 70.3 World Championship triathlon. Three cities, all of which currently host Ironman or Ironman 70.3 races, have been named as the finalists in the selection processNice (France), Budapest (Hungary) and Port Elizabeth, Nelson Mandela Bay (South Africa). The 2018 Ironman 70.3 World Championship will be a two-day event, like the 2017 editionwith the professional women and age-group women racing on one day and the professional men and age-group men racing on the other.

“The Ironman 70.3 triathlon series has grown exponentially over the past few years, with the World Championship featuring the best athletes from around the world,” said Andrew Messick, Chief Executive Officer of Ironman in the press release. “We have been extremely pleased with the global rotation of the event and providing our athletes with an exceptional world-class race in fantastic locations. Nice, Budapest and Port Elizabeth, Nelson Mandela Bay are all extraordinary hosts to current Ironman and Ironman 70.3 racesproviding beautiful and challenging courses and world-class hospitality for our athletes and families. Each city is well suited to host this pinnacle event.”

The Ironman 70.3 World Championship began an annual global rotation in 2014 in Mont-Tremblant, Quebec, Canada. The 2015 race was held in Europe for the first time, in Zell am See-Kaprun, SalzburgerLand, Austria. This September, the 2016 Ironman 70.3 World Championship shifts to the Southern Hemisphere for the first timein Queensland, Australia’s Sunshine Coast with athletes representing over 70 countries and ranging in age from 18 to 75-plus. In 2017, the championship event moves to Chattanooga, Tenn. where it will be a two-day event for the first time.

Beginning in July 2017, athletes from around the world will earn the right to compete in the 2018 Ironman 70.3 World Championship by qualifying at any of the more than 100 Ironman 70.3 events globally.

RELATED: Chattanooga, Tenn. to Host 2017 Ironman 70.3 World Championship

Learn more about the finalists from Ironman below:
Nice, France – Nice, located in the Côte d’Azur area on the southeast coast of France, is the capital of the stunning French Riviera and is the fifth-largest city in France. Host to Ironman France since 2005, Nice incorporates a swim in the pristine waters of the Mediterranean Sea and a run course along Nice’s historic Promenade des Anglais waterfront. With one of the largest international airports in France located just minutes away from the city, Nice is easily accessible and welcomes over five million visitors every year. Beyond the beauty of the area, Nice also offers a rich culture built by some of the greatest painters, writers and musicians the world has known. With year-round sunshine, a scenic location, and outstanding cuisine and culture, Nice embodies all the benefits of a historic coastal city.

Budapest, Hungary – Cited as one of the most beautiful cities in Europe, Budapest is the largest city in Hungary and is also one of the biggest cities in the European Union. This beloved tourist destination hosts Ironman 70.3 Budapest, joining the circuit in 2014. The Danube River, which is the longest river in the European Union, runs through the center of the city and along the Buda hills and Palace District. Budapest is well known for its restorative thermal baths, some of which date back to the Middle Ages. With a history that dates back to the 1200’s, the city attracts about 4.4 million tourists a year, making it the 25th most popular city in the world. Downtown’s nightlife district brings both culinary excellence and the relaxed atmosphere of underground-style lounges.

Port Elizabeth, Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa – The beachside community of Port Elizabeth within the Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality is South Africa’s second oldest city and is the coastal and economic hub of the Eastern Cape. Athletes and spectators who travel to Port Elizabeth get the unique opportunity to visit one of the most widely beautiful and historically significant places in the world. Currently hosting the Standard Bank Ironman African Championship, the course in Nelson Mandela Bay and the city of Port Elizabeth has athletes utilizing the beautiful surroundings of Hobie, Humewood and Kings Beaches. While fishing, surfing, whale watching, scuba diving, snorkeling and sailing are enjoyed by tourists, Nelson Mandela Bay also prides itself on offering the ability to see lions, rhinos, buffalo, leopards, and elephants in wildlife reserves outside the metropolitan area.

RELATED PHOTOS: 2015 Ironman 70.3 World Championships – Men’s Race

RELATED PHOTOS: 2016 Ironman 70.3 World Championships – Women’s Race

The post Ironman Announces 3 2018 70.3 World Championship Location Finalists appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/news/ironman-announces-3-2018-70-3-world-championship-location-finalists_131242/feed 0
Island House Tri Returns With Exciting Changes For 2016 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/news/island-house-tri-returns-with-exciting-changes-for-2016_131237 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/news/island-house-tri-returns-with-exciting-changes-for-2016_131237#comments Thu, 28 Apr 2016 20:58:03 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=131237

This year, all races will be non-drafting, and to level the playing field, long-course athletes can opt to race on their time-trial bikes.

The post Island House Tri Returns With Exciting Changes For 2016 appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Last year’s inaugural Island House Invitational Triathlon put some of the world’s best competitors head-to-head in a three-day race in the Bahamas, and this year’s race will add even more excitement to the mix. Starting on Oct. 28, 40 professional triathletes—double the amount from 2015—will race over the course of three days in various formats. This year, all races will be non-drafting, and to level the playing field, long-course athletes can opt to race on their time-trial bikes.

For the final day, only 10 men and 10 women will make the cut-off to race on the private island of Highbourne Cay (the first two days will be held on Nassau, home of The Island House hotel). According to a press release, invitees will include 2016 Olympians and long-course champions from all over the world, and last year’s winner Gwen Jorgensen will be back to defend her title after she races in her second Olympic Games in Rio in August. The prize purse will again be $500,000, with $60,000 designated for the winner.

Another exciting change is the new partnership with More Than Sport, a non-profit centered on athletes helping communities close to races. A one-hour national TV recap of the event will also be broadcast after the race.

To learn more, go to Islandhousetriathlon.com.

RELATED: Gomez And Jorgensen Take $60K Wins At Island House

The post Island House Tri Returns With Exciting Changes For 2016 appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/news/island-house-tri-returns-with-exciting-changes-for-2016_131237/feed 0
Jesse Thomas Going After Sixth-Straight Wildflower Win http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/news/jesse-thomas-going-after-6th-wildflower-win_131232 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/news/jesse-thomas-going-after-6th-wildflower-win_131232#comments Thu, 28 Apr 2016 20:11:23 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=131232

Thomas celebrates his fifth Wildflower victory. Photo: Rocky Arroyo

Americans Jesse Thomas and Liz Lyles return to the Wildflower Festival weekend to defend their long course titles.

The post Jesse Thomas Going After Sixth-Straight Wildflower Win appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Americans Jesse Thomas and Liz Lyles return to the Wildflower Festival weekend to defend their long course titles. 

This weekend, elites and age-group triathletes will travel to Lake San Antonio to take part in the 34th running of the Wildflower Triathlons. All athletes will compete on a “drought-modified” course for the third year in a row.

Along with its marquee long course triathlon (1.2-mile swim, 2.2-mile run to T1, 56-mile bike, 10.9-mile run), Wildflower will host sprint, Olympic and mountain bike triathlons as part of its famous weekend festival that is expected to welcome up to 7,500 athletes and 30,000 spectators.

For the last five consecutive years Jesse Thomas (USA) has dominated the men’s field, and now holds the record for the most Wildflower wins. Thomas will race this Saturday, with his eye on an unprecedented sixth-straight championship. Thomas will again have to bring his best to the starting line, as he will be competing again against his hometown buddy, and last year’s second place finisher, Matt Lieto. Thomas and Lieto had nearly identical swim and bike splits during last year’s race but Thomas was able to gain a few minutes on the run to solidify the lead.

Thomas and Lieto will also be contending with the strength of an impressive pro field. Wildflower’s 2006 champion and current course record holder Terrenzo Bozzone (NZL) will be returning to this year’s starting line. Bozzone is a former Ironman 70.3 world champion who has proven to be a strong force in this distance. Bozzone earned top-three finishes in all six of his 2015 Ironman 70.3 races and will be charging to add another win on race day.

Adding to a powerful men’s lineup is David Giardini, who had the fastest swim split of the day at last year’s race and then went on to out bike all of the competition, earning the fastest bike split as well. Giardini will be joined by top pros, Chris Lieferman, Thomas Gerlach, Derek Garcia and Matty Reed as they all compete for a coveted spot on the podium.

The women’s elite field will welcome back Wildflower’s 2015 Champion Liz Lyles (USA). Lyles nabbed the title from three-time champion Heather Jackson also of Bend, Ore., in a dramatic sprint finish that resulted in Jackson collapsing in the finisher’s chute. While Jackson won’t be racing Wildflower this year, Lyles will still face a few tough names.

Laurel Wassner (USA) will be returning to race her third Wildflower Triathlon. Wassner won her first pro race in 2010 at the Columbia Triathlon and placed fifth at Wildflower last year. Emily Cocks (USA) will also be on the start list again after a seventh-place finish in 2015.

RELATED PHOTOS: 2015 Wildflower Triathlon

Men Elite Start List (In Alphabetical Order)
Christopher Bagg
Chris Baird
AJ Baucco
Terenzo Bozzone
Nicholas Chase
James Cook
Ben Collins
Sam Corace
Justin Daerr
John Dahlz
Nathan Dressel
Andrew Drobeck
Alistar Eeckman
Charlie Epperson
Derek Garcia
Thomas Gerlach
Davide Giardini
Yu Hsiao
Tyler Jordan
Nathan Killam
Andrew Langfield
Chris Leiferman
Matt Lieto
Steve Mantell
Matthew Organista
Jason Pederson
Branden Rakita
Matthew Reed
Thomas Roos
Matthew Russell
Alexander Schilling
Jesse Thomas
Maik Twelsiek
Jesse Vondracek
Shawn Wilyman

RELATED: Wildflower Triathlon Features Unique Registration Options For 2016

Women Elite Start List (In Alphabetical Order)
Emily Cocks
Alyssa Godesky
Erin Green
Kelly Kosmo
Cathleen Knutson
Kara LaPoint
Elizabeth Lyles
Mackenzie Madison
Leslie Miller
Julie Patterson
Robin Pomeroy
Jessica Smith
Amy VanTassel
Nicole Valentine
Laurel Wassner
Kelly Withrow

RELATED – No Rest And No Regrets: Liz Lyles’ Story

The post Jesse Thomas Going After Sixth-Straight Wildflower Win appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/news/jesse-thomas-going-after-6th-wildflower-win_131232/feed 0
3 Ways To Improve Your Swim Posture http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/training/3-ways-to-improve-your-swim-posture_114475 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/training/3-ways-to-improve-your-swim-posture_114475#comments Thu, 28 Apr 2016 19:14:51 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=114475

Illustration by Oliver Baker.

Key in on these focus points to get the most out of your stroke.

The post 3 Ways To Improve Your Swim Posture appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>

Key in on these focus points to get the most out of your stroke.

Growing up, you likely were told to stand up straight or not to slouch. That same advice should be carried to the water, where your posture significantly affects body position. Pay attention to these key postural focuses to help reduce excess drag and increase lift and speed. Use the concepts below to help create better posture in the water. Have a friend or swim coach video your stroke. You may be humbled by what you see, but you will have an honest look at how you’re moving in the water and the areas that need the most focus. Remember, swim proud!

1. First, pay attention to your head position. If your head is too high or too low, your hips and legs will drop and cause drag. You’ll find the sweet spot while gazing underwater a few feet in front of you at the black line until the waterline breaks at the top third of your head. This creates a bow wave off of your head and a subsequent pocket of air to easily breathe into. With the visual reference point on the black line, you can now create consistency and keep your head position in check.

RELATED: Two Simple Ways to Strengthen Your Swim Catch

The post 3 Ways To Improve Your Swim Posture appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/training/3-ways-to-improve-your-swim-posture_114475/feed 0
Defending Champions Return To Ironman Australia http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/news/ironman-australia-preview_130664 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/news/ironman-australia-preview_130664#comments Thu, 28 Apr 2016 17:27:48 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=130664

Paul Ambrose will return to defend. Photo: Delly Carr

Australia's Paul Ambrose and New Zealand's Michelle Bremer will return to Port Macquarie to defend their titles.

The post Defending Champions Return To Ironman Australia appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Australia’s Paul Ambrose and New Zealand’s Michelle Bremer will return to Port Macquarie, New South Wales, Australia to defend their Ironman Australia titles this Sunday, May 1.

Read the preview from Ironman below:

Ambrose won his first Ironman Australia title in 2012, but was unable to defend it the following year. This time, he’s focussed all his energies on racing well as defending champion. “I wanted to go back in 2013 to defend my title, but problems with my race schedule meant it didn’t work out. This year everything has pointed to me to Ironman Australia,” he said.

Bremer enjoyed a career year in 2015 following her Ironman Australia win with a third at Ironman Cairns just over a month later.

“I can’t wait to race again at Port Macquarie. Last year was an incredible experience and I feel honored to be able to come back as defending champion this year,” Bremer said. “This race feels like my home away from home race (I’m originally from NZ and now living in Penrith, Sydney), so to back up with another win would be amazing.”

Ambrose will resume pleasantries with the 2014 champion and last year’s runner-up Luke Bell. Last year, the pair waged an enormous battle on the run with Ambrose digging deep to hold off the fast-finishing Bell.

Joining them on the start line will be fellow Aussies; 70.3 specialist Tim Reed who is fresh of a third at Ironman 70.3 California, two-time Olympian Brad Kahlefeldt and Ironman rookie Josh Amberger.

RELATED: Tim Reed’s Secrets To Sustained Success

Amberger, who was rarely off the Ironman 70.3 podium last year, has continued his good form this year with a second to world champion Jan Frodeno at Ironman 70.3 Dubai, second at Ironman 70.3 Geelong and second at Ironman 70.3 Putrajaya.

“I had a great run of training from December 2015 to the end of January 2016, which I capped off with podiums in Dubai and Geelong. A lot of the injuries that stopped me from reaching my potential in 2015 had cleared up and with these results and good feeling in training, I thought it was the right time to try Ironman,” Amberger said.

In the women’s race, Bremer’s main threats could come from fellow Kiwi Gina Crawford and American Beth Gerdes.

Crawford and Bremer both raced at Ironman New Zealand in March finishing eighth and sixth respectively, while Gerdes enjoyed a breakout year in 2015 winning her first Ironman in Switzerland and finishing 15th in her first trip to the Ironman World Championship in Hawaii.

“The lead up has been going well, I took some positives and some areas to work on away from Ironman New Zealand,” Bremer said “Since then it’s been a mix and recovery and some solid miles over the past couple of weeks, but I feel generally well and on track to race again at Ironman Australia.”

Race weekend will see more than 2,400 age-group athletes chasing their own personal bests.

RELATED VIDEO: Beth Gerdes Shares The Journey To 2015 Kona

See the pro start list below:

Men
1 Paul Ambrose (AUS)
2 Luke Bell (AUS)
3 Brad Kahlefeldt (AUS)
4 David Dellow (AUS)
5 Clayton Fettell (AUS)
6 Tim Reed (AUS)
7 Dougal Allan (NZL)
8 Casey Munro (AUS)
9 Josh Amberger (AUS)
10 Levi Maxwell (AUS)
11 Simon Billeau (FRA)
12 Allister Caird (AUS)
13 Simon Cochrane (NZL)
14 Mitch Dean (AUS)
15 Michael Fox (AUS)
16 Adam Gordon (AUS)
17 Jarmo Hast (FIN)
18 Darren Jenkins (AUS)
19 Jim Lubinski (USA)
20 Samuel Murphy (AUS)
21 Caleb Noble (AUS)
22 Matt Randall (NZL)
23 Leigh Stabryla (AUS)
24 Lindsey Wall (AUS)

Women
31 Michelle Bremer (NZL)
32 Gina Crawford (NZL)
33 Beth Gerdes (USA)
34 Melanie Burke (NZL)
35 Dimity-Lee Duke (AUS)
36 Amy Javens (USA)
37 Lisa Marangon (AUS)
38 Tamsyn Hayes (NZL)
39 Kristy Hallett (AUS)
40 Wendy McAlpine (AUS)
41 Ali Fitch (AUS)
42 Lauren Parker (AUS)
43 Jessica Richards (AUS)

The post Defending Champions Return To Ironman Australia appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/news/ironman-australia-preview_130664/feed 0
Recipe: Butternut Squash, Spinach & Charred Tomato Hash http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/nutrition/recipe-butternut-squash-spinach-charred-tomato-hash_131226 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/nutrition/recipe-butternut-squash-spinach-charred-tomato-hash_131226#comments Thu, 28 Apr 2016 16:51:53 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=131226

This comforting breakfast recipe can triple as lunch or dinner.

The post Recipe: Butternut Squash, Spinach & Charred Tomato Hash appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
This comforting breakfast recipe can triple as lunch or dinner. Add some crispy bacon and a slice of hearty bread for a satisfying and replenishing post-training meal.

Ingredients

Makes 2 servings

2 cups butternut squash, diced (about ½ medium squash)
8 heaping cups fresh spinach
2 tomatoes-on-the-vine, cut into segments
1 shallot (or ¼ red onion), finely diced
2 TBSP olive oil
2-4 eggs
Salt and pepper

RELATED: Four Ways To Use … Eggplant

Preparation

1. Heat 1 TBSP oil in a large sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add the squash, shallot and a sprinkle of salt and pepper and sauté for about 10 minutes until the squash is golden and starting to soften (lower heat if it starts to blacken). Add any fresh or dry herbs you like to the pan.
2. Add the spinach and tomatoes to the pan with another sprinkle of salt and pepper, cook about 5 minutes until the spinach is wilted, and the tomatoes have a nice char on them.
3. Remove ingredients from the pan on to two plates.
4. Return the pan back to the same heat, and heat the other 1 TBSP of olive oil. Crack two eggs into the pan, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and let cook until the whites start to set. Using a spoon, spoon the warm oil onto the whites of the eggs until they are cooked through. Finish by spooning oil over the yolks of the eggs, to ensure the white portion under the yolks has cooked through.
5. Remove the eggs with a spatula, and place on top of the hash on the plates. Repeat this step with two more eggs if desired. If the pan is large enough, you can cook all four eggs at one time.

RELATED RECIPE: Veggie And Bacon Hash

More recipes from Jessica Cerra

Jessica Cerra is the owner of Fit Food by Jess, a private chef and catering company in Encinitas, Calif., and the co-founder of Harmony Bar. A former professional XTERRA triathlete, Cerra now races for Twenty16 Women’s Professional Cycling Team.

The post Recipe: Butternut Squash, Spinach & Charred Tomato Hash appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/nutrition/recipe-butternut-squash-spinach-charred-tomato-hash_131226/feed 0
Master The Mental Game When Anxiety Hits http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/training/master-the-mental-game-when-anxiety-hits_131223 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/training/master-the-mental-game-when-anxiety-hits_131223#comments Thu, 28 Apr 2016 13:18:29 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=131223

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Though a small case of nerves can be useful (fear can be a powerful motivator!), too much is a recipe for disaster.

The post Master The Mental Game When Anxiety Hits appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
Master the mental game when anxiety hits.

Tight muscles, choppy breathing, negative self-talk—these are just some ways anxiety manifests in triathletes. Though a small case of nerves can be useful (fear can be a powerful motivator!), too much is a recipe for disaster.

Dr. Jim Taylor, author of Triathletes’ Guide to Mental Training, says anxiety affects more than emotions—frequently, anxious athletes see physical hindrances in performance, such as a shortened stride while running or “spinning squares” on the bike. As such, it’s important to learn to reduce anxiety to increase performance.

“Optimal sports performance occurs in the present moment with a positive mindset,” says Karen Quigley of True Form Coaching. “Since it’s inevitable that anxiety will happen at some point, when you are prepared for how to handle it, it won’t have to knock you off your game.”

Panic button: A bad training day

“It’s all about perspective,” Taylor says. “Never judge your overall fitness based on yesterday’s training. Rather than bumming out about a bad day, use it as a sign you may need to have a rest day.”

Panic button: The dreaded descent

Progressive muscle relaxation while on the bike is an excellent way to learn to relax and enjoy the downhills, says Quigley. When you notice muscle tension in your body while riding, tense up that spot even more to highlight the pattern of tension in your body. As you gradually release the tension, pay attention to how good relaxation can feel!

RELATED: Don’t Dread The Descent!

Panic button: Pre-race second thoughts

If your pulse is racing while you’re setting up in transition, don’t forget to breathe. “Research shows that slow, deep breathing is physiologically calming,” Quigley says. Inhale for a slow count of seven, hold your breath for a second, then exhale for seven more seconds. Repeat as needed.

Panic button: The chaotic swim start

No doubt, the swim start can be one of the most nerve-wracking experiences for triathletes. For damage control: “Realize that races are rarely won out of the water. Stop and tread water. Take some deep breaths, and get your bearing before finding open water.”

RELATED: Tips For Relieving Open-Water Anxiety

Panic button: A mid-race flat

Changing a flat tire is a lot easier with a steady hand, so calm down. “Accept that flats happen,” Taylor says. “Realize that this isn’t the Olympics, so 5–10 minutes is disappointing but not world ending. Hopefully, you’ll have practiced changing a tire. Take your time and go step by step.”

RELATED: 3 Mental Tips For Getting Better At Dealing with Pain

The post Master The Mental Game When Anxiety Hits appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/training/master-the-mental-game-when-anxiety-hits_131223/feed 0
Gift Guide For Multisport Mothers http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/photos/gift-guide-for-multisport-mothers_131198 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/photos/gift-guide-for-multisport-mothers_131198#comments Wed, 27 Apr 2016 20:51:29 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=131198

Spoil mom with a swim-bike-run flair this Mother’s Day.

The post Gift Guide For Multisport Mothers appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
$(document).ready(function() { $(".fancybox").fancybox({type: 'image', margin : [20, 60, 20, 60]}); });

RELATED: 2016 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide

The post Gift Guide For Multisport Mothers appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/photos/gift-guide-for-multisport-mothers_131198/feed 0
Crowdsourced: Balancing Triathlon Training With Family http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/training/crowdsourced-balancing-triathlon-training-family_130433 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/training/crowdsourced-balancing-triathlon-training-family_130433#comments Wed, 27 Apr 2016 16:40:01 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=130433

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Triathlete readers share the clever tricks they’ve picked up along the way.

The post Crowdsourced: Balancing Triathlon Training With Family appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
How do you balance triathlon training with family? There’s no easy answer to this question, so we reached out to you, our Triathlete readers, to find out what clever tricks you’ve picked up along the way.

– “I try to include my family when I can. Run with the boys on their bikes. Bring them to the pool. I am fortunate to have an amazing Sherpa. She will bring the boys to set up aid stations for long runs or long rides. They love coming to the beach for the open-water swims. The more you can include them the better.” —Christopher Roberts via Facebook

– “You can try to incorporate family into training—encourage them to join you in a local 10K, add a group hike before the cookout, plan a trip to a local pool together, etc.” —Sara Colangelo via Facebook

– “If both parents like to tri, alternate training years. That doesn’t mean the other doesn’t get to do anything, but the focus is on one parent at a time so there is never any argument about whose turn it is to do what.” —Debbie Feldner Claggett via Facebook

– “I get my sessions in before they wake up and have breakfast so I don’t waste ‘family time.’ 3 a.m. to 8 a.m. gets me solid training time and a full family day!” —Stephen Hayes via Facebook

– “I always find a way to fit a workout in during my kids’ sports activities. Whether it’s running on a nearby trail during soccer, or setting up the bike on my trainer on the side of the baseball field, I use that time to pack in as much as possible.” —Jennifer Connor Niederhausen via Facebook

RELATED: 7 Tips For Balancing Training With Life

– “We will do a family bike path outing. Our three kids will bike while we run and try to keep up. It’s speedwork at its best!” —@Juliependergrast via Instagram

– “My kids help me on my shorter runs. My two older kids love to ride while I run, and the baby loves getting pushed in the BOB [stroller] chasing his brother and sister.” —@3meg13 via Instagram

– “We set up an art studio in the garage next to the treadmill and the bike trainer so we can train and the kids can do art and spend hours with us happily cheering us on and vice versa.” —@ironman_nick via Instagram

– “My kids are older so they join me in swims, some runs and some rides. I have to adjust my training, but I grab these opportunities of quality time.” —Kylie Hohn via Facebook

– “Split your training into two workouts per day: one before they wake up and one after they fall asleep.” —@Kabalainen via Twitter

– “My wife is a runner and we have an 8-month-old baby. I combine my endurance training [with strength training] pushing our running stroller with the baby, while she does her speed training. This way we are both pushing each other and training together.” —@cheoherrera via Instagram

– “I try to train early in the mornings on weekdays so I don’t disrupt family time after work. I’ve also taken my daughter out on runs with me or she will ride her bike while I run. She does her first triathlon in a few months … looking forward to training with her for that!” —@808kce via Instagram

RELATED – Pro Advice: Balancing Triathlon And Family Relationships

The post Crowdsourced: Balancing Triathlon Training With Family appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/training/crowdsourced-balancing-triathlon-training-family_130433/feed 0
Eat And Run: Are Eggs Good Or Bad? http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/nutrition/eat-and-run-are-eggs-good-or-bad_6526 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/nutrition/eat-and-run-are-eggs-good-or-bad_6526#comments Wed, 27 Apr 2016 16:05:38 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/2011/08/videos/eat-and-run-are-eggs-good-or-bad_7414

Yes, you can enjoy the occasional omelet and not feel bad about it!

The post Eat And Run: Are Eggs Good Or Bad? appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
In this video Dr. John Berardi breaks down the pros and cons of including eggs in your diet. Eggs have long been connected to high cholesterol levels, but Dr. Berardi explains how even someone with high cholesterol can still enjoy the occasional omelet.

More Eat and Run videos.

The post Eat And Run: Are Eggs Good Or Bad? appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/04/nutrition/eat-and-run-are-eggs-good-or-bad_6526/feed 0