Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com Triathlon Training, Gear, Nutrition, Photos, Race Results & Calendars Fri, 28 Nov 2014 18:55:17 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 Dispatch: What To Do In Phuket http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/features/dispatch-phuket_109979 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/features/dispatch-phuket_109979#comments Fri, 28 Nov 2014 18:55:17 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=109979

Check out these three must-do’s as you consider planning a future trip to this Southeast Asian paradise.

The post Dispatch: What To Do In Phuket appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>


As home base for the Challenge Laguna Phuket Tri-Fest, the island of Phuket, Thailand has plenty of perfect venues for swimming, cycling and running. But the island boasts much more than an adrenalin fix for endurance athletes. Check out these three must-do’s as you consider planning a future trip to this Southeast Asian paradise.

A lazy day at Bang Tao Beach

The Laguna Phuket Resort (lagunaphuket.com), host to the Challenge Laguna Phuket Tri-Fest, sits smack on Bang Tao Beach, one of the most idyllic waterfronts you’ll ever find. From your room at one of the resort’s seven hotels (I recommend the Dusit Thani, where I’ve enjoyed a luxurious stay the past two years) it’s just few hundred yards to the sand and an ideal spot to while away your first day in Thailand. The gentle waves of the Andaman Sea are sure to wash away any residual jet lag, and the azure warm water is an absolute delight for swimming, bodysurfing or simply floating. After a few hours of playing in the water and lounging in the sun, scoot over to the open air massage tent for an even deeper hour of relaxation. A one-hour “oil massage” employs a blend of Swedish and Thai techniques, perfect pre-race prep or post-race recovery. And after the long-haul flight it’s the best 500 Thai Baht (approximately $15 USD) you’ll ever spend. Rinse off in the ocean again post-massage, then purchase a fresh grilled ear of corn and a fresh green coconut from one of the beachfront vendors for a delicious island-style snack. Keep an eye out for Kandi, the resort’s resident three-year-old baby elephant, who usually visits the beach in the late afternoon and enjoys giving trunk hugs and kisses to everyone she meets.

RELATED: Laguna Phuket Travel Advice

The post Dispatch: What To Do In Phuket appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/features/dispatch-phuket_109979/feed 0
Dispatch: Granger’s Stories From A Dozen Years In Phuket http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/features/dispatch-grangers-stories-dozen-years-phuket_109944 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/features/dispatch-grangers-stories-dozen-years-phuket_109944#comments Thu, 27 Nov 2014 14:43:03 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=109944

This week at the Challenge Laguna Phuket Tri-Fest Australian pro Belinda Granger will celebrate a major milestone.

The post Dispatch: Granger’s Stories From A Dozen Years In Phuket appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>

This week at the Challenge Laguna Phuket Tri-Fest Australian pro Belinda Granger will celebrate a major milestone. It’s her 12th and final time racing here over a 14-year span and will mark the official end to her professional triathlon career–a career that includes 50 iron-distance races, 15 iron-distance titles and more than 20 short course and half-distance victories. I asked Granger to share a few of the most memorable stories from a dozen years racing in Phuket.

“Definitely the most memorable moment for me happened when I won for the first time in 2008. I’d been coming here for quite a few years and I’d always finished on the podium, so I was quite happy about that but I’d never got the top spot. One of the reasons I wanted to get the top spot is because traditionally at this race you get to run down the chute with a young elephant. I mean there’s no race in the world that does that, so it’s a big deal. I’d seen other girls get that opportunity to run down in first place, but I’d always come second or third. So the year that I finally won the race, I remember knowing that I’d won with pretty much two kilometers to go and all I could think about was getting to that finish chute and running down it with the baby elephant. The elephant was there waiting, but for some reason unbeknownst to anyone, he decided to run the opposite way. So as I got into the finish straight and saw the little elephant and I was thinking he was going to run with me, he did a U-turn and ran in the complete opposite direction. I was left halfway down the chute going, “Come on! Wrong way! It’s this way!” Long story short, I didn’t get to run down the chute with the baby elephant. I don’t even know where he ended up! Everyone could see the humorous side of it, except I was left at the line without the baby elephant.”

“Obviously other memorable moments here have been from the after parties. Of course we’ve got to keep this G-rated, but they’re just so much fun! Like the shirtless boys on stage doing the YMCA dance, which made YouTube and got so many hits it was just ridiculous. And we all like shirtless triathlete boys! I still remember Tim O’Donnell playing the starring role in that YMCA dance. Since then the Phuket after parties have become infamous around the world.”

RELATED: Belinda Granger’s Tips For Cycling Longevity

“I still remember the first year I was invited to Laguna Phuket. It was my very first proper professional invitation to a race where everything was paid for. I must have been late 20’s or early 30’s, so I was young compared to today and I had never been on a holiday anywhere like this. We turned up to the Banyan Tree and were shown our villa for the first time and Justin had to keep reminding me to close my mouth. I think my jaw was hanging open that far, because obviously the accommodations are beyond anything we’d ever stayed in anywhere. It really is one of those races where you think you know what you’re getting, and then you actually get here and it’s just so much better than you ever could have imagined–in every aspect, from the carbo dinner to the awards dinner to the accommodations here in Laguna Phuket to the race itself. It’s just spectacular.”

Granger celebrated her birthday in Phuket last week and was honored with a special cake, courtesy of the Banyan Tree, one of many surprises they’ve presented to her over the years.

“By my 10th year here it had become a well-known thing that I love mango sticky rice. To celebrate my 10th race, the Banyan Tree made me a sticky rice and mango cake and presented it to me at the press conference, which was pretty unbelievable. I got through quite a bit of it that night, which was probably not the best thing the night before the race, but oh well! This time they told me they were going to make me a cake for my birthday. Justin and I went to the Banyan Tree’s signature restaurant, Saffron, which is an incredible Thai restaurant, and they presented me with the cake there. They’d obviously gone out of their way to decorate it with a picture of me running across the finish line, and it’s the funniest thing. The comments on Facebook are just priceless. Someone said it looks more like Sebastian Kienle than it does me! And someone commented about my short stumpy arms. But that’s how I’m going to look in two weeks time when I leave the buffet breakfast at the Banyan Tree for the last time–stumpy! It’s just too good.”

More Dispatch.

The post Dispatch: Granger’s Stories From A Dozen Years In Phuket appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/features/dispatch-grangers-stories-dozen-years-phuket_109944/feed 0
HED Cycling Founder Steve Hed Dies At 59 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/news/hed-cycling-founder-steve-hed-dies-59_109956 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/news/hed-cycling-founder-steve-hed-dies-59_109956#comments Wed, 26 Nov 2014 21:17:45 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=109956

Steve Hed will be remembered for his warm, curious personality and brilliant innovations in the field of bicycle aerodynamics. He died Wednesday at age 59. Photo courtesy of HED Cycling.

We've learned that the sport has lost an icon with the passing of Steve Hed, the founder of Hed Cycling, at the age of 59.

The post HED Cycling Founder Steve Hed Dies At 59 appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>

Steve Hed will be remembered for his warm, curious personality and brilliant innovations in the field of bicycle aerodynamics. He died Wednesday at age 59. Photo courtesy of HED Cycling.

Steve Hed, a relentless tinkerer whose innovations in aerodynamics and wheel design set industry trends for three decades, died Wednesday. He was 59.

Hed collapsed outside one of the HED facilities, the company he founded, last Thursday. CPR was administered on the scene and as he was rushed to the hospital. He was removed from life-support on Tuesday night and passed away Wednesday morning.

The all-caps HED logo became an icon of the cycling industry over the course of three decades. Hed’s toroidal rim shape set a new standard for wheel aerodynamics; his wider rims changed the trajectory of the entire industry; his one-piece aero bars were revolutionary.

Hed’s life was centered on and around the bicycle. In grade school and high school, Hed was a cyclist and a model airplane enthusiast. He cited the Wright brothers as an inspiration, when asked about his education in an interview from earlier this year with the Greater MSP Business television show on KSTP Channel 5.

During the early 1980s he owned a small bike shop in the Twin Cities area called Grand Performance. His curious and generous nature was naturally attractive.

He made the acquaintance of a composites tinkerer, and the two started making affordable aero bicycle wheels. Hed didn’t create the first disc wheel, but he popularized them among the triathlon community, a sport he supported from its early moments, building composite disc wheels in his garage using woodworking tools. That was in 1985 and his company, HED, is considered by some to be the first triathlon-specific manufacturer.

He also met his wife, Anne, while working at Grand Performance. Anne had heard the shop owner helped triathletes with expenses, and sure enough, Hed reached into the cash register and helped pay for her first Ironman. Anne would become the CEO of HED Cycling.

Hed was proud of the company he built, and the products it produced in the United States. His rivalry with Zipp was deep, but amicable. “The U.S. manufacturers are still the best,” he said in the same KSTP interview. “We have a competitor in Indianapolis [Zipp] and one in Utah [ENVE], and they’re both making great products.”

Though Zipp and HED were considered arch-rivals for many years, numerous current and former owners and employees from Zipp regularly visited the HED booth during the Interbike trade show, an indication of Hed’s personality and reputation. His relationship with Zipp’s former owner, Andy Ording, grew into a warm friendship after Ording sold his company to SRAM in 2007.

Hed was a technical advisor to many of those at the top of the sport, including Lance Armstrong, who was fiercely loyal to HED wheels through much of his racing career. Hed became the aero bike fitter for Armstrong, Levi Leipheimer, and others on that team.

“Such a loss. HED was the first sponsor I ever had,” Armstrong said. “I was 16. He called and said, ‘I wanna sponsor you.’ I was thinking ‘Cool, a free disc wheel.’ Then he says, ‘I want you to ride my wheels and I’ll pay you 500 bucks a month.’ This is in 1987. I thought I was a millionaire.”

Also, on Twitter, Armstrong said, “Shocked and saddened to learn of the passing of Steve Hed. I loved him dearly as did everyone who ever met him. We’ll all miss him.”

Numerous professional triathletes also expressed their condolences on Twitter. Hed is survived by his wife of 24 years, Anne Hed, a son Andrew and daughter Rebecca.

The post HED Cycling Founder Steve Hed Dies At 59 appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/news/hed-cycling-founder-steve-hed-dies-59_109956/feed 0
Triathlete.com’s Thanksgiving 2014 Fitness Challenge http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/training/triathlete-coms-thanksgiving-2014-fitness-challenge_109953 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/training/triathlete-coms-thanksgiving-2014-fitness-challenge_109953#comments Wed, 26 Nov 2014 21:08:09 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=109953

Photo: Shutterstock.com

If you want a bonus strength/cardio workout you can execute in a short amount of time, here are a few options.

The post Triathlete.com’s Thanksgiving 2014 Fitness Challenge appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>

Photo: Shutterstock.com

The go-to statistic of what the average American will consume on Thanksgiving clocks in around 3,000 calories, according to the Calorie Control Council. So although that Turkey Trot you’re signed up for will rev up your metabolism in the morning, if you want a bonus strength/cardio workout you can execute in a short amount of time or while multi-tasking in the house, here are a few options.

Thanksgiving Challenge #1: All-Day Tally

Much like 2013’s Thanksgiving Fitness Challenge, your goal is to reach these totals however you can manage from the time you wake up to when you pass out on the couch. Keep a tally as you go.

250 Sit-ups
200 Walking lunges
150 Push-ups
100 Leg raises
50 Burpees
25 V-ups
5 minutes each of regular, left, right planks (15 minutes total)

Thanksgiving Challenge #2: Full Body Pain Cave

This quick burner was one of our favorite one-hour workouts this year from coach Julie Dunkle. You can do it on the treadmill, a track or on the road, so long as you have a way to track distance.

Run
800 warm-up easy
400 at 80%
400 at 100%

Strength circuit
Do two rounds without stopping: 10 push-ups, 10 full squats, 20 crunches, 10 burpees

Run
400 easy
400 hard
400 easy
400 hard

Strength circuit
Do two rounds without stopping: 10 push-ups, 10 full squats, 30 crunches, 10 burpees

Run
800 build to 80%
800 all-out
400 super easy

Strength circuit

Do two rounds without stopping: 10 pushups, 10 full squats, 40 crunches, 10 burpees

Run
800 easy
400 all-out
400 easy

Strength circuit

Do two rounds without stopping: 10 pushups, 10 full squats, 50 crunches, 10 burpees

Run
400 easy
400 hard

Cool down with an easy jog until you reach one hour.

Thanksgiving Challenge #3: 15-Minute Torcher

Only have 15 minutes to spare? Make the most of it with this circuit. Do every exercise for one minute before moving on to the next. You’ll do three rounds total.

1. Mountain climbers: In a push-up position, continuously alternate driving your right foot outside your right hand and left foot outside of left hand in a quick, jumping movement.

2. Side-to-side push-ups: Do a push-up, then walk both arms and legs two steps to the right, and do another. Return to the starting position by walking back to the left. Keep repeating for the minute.

3. Jumping air squats: Start in a squat position and jump into the air, returning to the ground with a soft landing.

4. High knees/butt kicks: Either in place or moving if you can, do continuous high knees (short steps, fast cadence, bringing knees as close to the chest as possible) for 30 seconds and switch to butt kicks (fast cadence, try to literally kick your butt with your heel) at the halfway mark.

5. Bicycle crunches: Lie on your back, with legs slightly off the ground as you bring your elbow to the opposite knee in a quick, continuous motion.

The post Triathlete.com’s Thanksgiving 2014 Fitness Challenge appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/training/triathlete-coms-thanksgiving-2014-fitness-challenge_109953/feed 0
Brett Sutton: Why Nicola Spirig Is Racing Ironman Cozumel http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/race-coverage/brett-sutton-nicola-spirig-racing-ironman-cozumel_109950 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/race-coverage/brett-sutton-nicola-spirig-racing-ironman-cozumel_109950#comments Wed, 26 Nov 2014 18:32:06 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=109950

Nicola Spirig is the defending Olympic champion. Photo: Delly Carr/Triathlon.org

Sutton’s words don’t just apply to his star athlete, they contain sound advice for age groupers everywhere and why to take on a

The post Brett Sutton: Why Nicola Spirig Is Racing Ironman Cozumel appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>

Nicola Spirig is the defending Olympic champion. Photo: Delly Carr/Triathlon.org

After she decided to race her first Ironman in Cozumel this weekend, 2012 gold medalist Nicola Spirig’s coach Brett Sutton saw plenty of reactions that led him to respond in a blog post on Trisutto.com. If you didn’t get a chance to read it, Sutton’s words don’t just apply to his star athlete, they contain sound advice for age groupers everywhere and why to take on a challenge.

From trisutto.com:

Nicola Spirig’s recent announcement to compete in Ironman, while welcomed by many, has caused my inbox to start overflowing with panicked emails from Swiss heavies questioning such a dubious ‘Olympic compromising’ decision at the end of an already, as she puts it, ‘crazy’ season.

But this IM debut is not about racing. It’s about staying true to a philosophy that has taken her to highest peaks of our sport and encapsulates everything that old-school triathletes stand for. Taking on a challenge simply because you can.

Like the majority of participants in our sport, Nicola competes in triathlon primarily because it is a passion and a hobby. Triathlon is part of her life, not all of it. Yes, she may be the Olympic Champion, but I can name no other professional triathlete who has kept their sport their passion and hobby while still managing to get on with real life like Nicola.

Strip away the results and you’ll see that Nicola is the ultimate age-group athlete. Just look at the career without the wins.

Nicola started competing in triathlons at the age of 10. She went on to represent her country at Junior level, but unlike others didn’t then move straight to the pro ranks. Instead, it was university for Ms Spirig, who continued doing all kinds of races on the side because racing was fun.

It was only with an Olympic opportunity beckoning she committed to being a full-time athlete, secured her spot and soon after found it wasn’t so fun any more. The grind of following the circuit proved less than stimulating and her form year on year went into a spiral.

When Nicola first joined the Sutton squad, I used every old coaching trick in the book to get her prodigious athletic talent to fire. All to little avail. Until one day I realised she wasn’t like any of my other pro athletes, she’s a throwback to a previous triathlon generation. Nicola needs a life away from triathlon in order to enjoy her hobby and not be consumed by it.

So back to university for Nicola, who is now a fully-fledged lawyer and legal eagle. Upon her return to triathlon she started doing non-drafting races along with a few half Ironmans along the way. Why? To put the spark back into her sporting life we had to go back to why she enjoyed doing triathlons in the first place. It worked. Approaching races the same way as any age group athlete with a full life to consider she caught fire. Absolutely caught wildfire. Back came the smile and by 2012 she was standing on top of the Olympic dais.

With the Olympics over did she keep racing to cash in on being Switzerland’s only gold medalist from the Games? No. Like many age-groupers whose passions have taken up more time than sometimes is fair, 2013 was family time. Married in 2013 and baby Yannis soon after. When felt she was ready to come back she did. A stunning victory at the World Cup.

‘Wow. She’s back!’ ‘Look out for her on the ITU circuit.’ No need. 2014 was about doing the things she loved in sport, non-drafting races, athletics, and a shot at achieving a lifelong goal of representing her country as a runner, which she did at the European Championships in her home town of Zurich. In 2014 she also established a Kids Cup triathlon series in Switzerland that bears her name. To cap it off and show 2013 was no fluke last month she came back and won two ITU World Cups in two weeks.

So why is she competing in her debut Ironman now? Easy. Because she can. Because it’s a challenge. Because it’s fun and all her training partners are going to be there. Should she, or any other competitor on the start line need any more reason? Absolutely not.

As for the heavies who want to put the pressure on about how ‘you need to start to get serious now because you’ll miss your qualifying points’, they are completely missing the point. You’re talking to someone who had not just the courage, but freedom of thought to compete in a half Ironman 13 days before winning the Olympics. If you think she’s going to blink over this you’re sadly mistaken.

As for the race in Cozumel itself. Is she ready? Training-wise not even close. She’s spent the year running, not riding. But that’s also beside the point. Like most other age-group athletes Nicola goes into this race under-prepared but with a smile on her face and an apprehension in her heart about whether she’s got what it takes to complete an Ironman. We will see the answer to that [this weekend].

RELATED: Gold Medalist Nicola Spirig To Race First Ironman

The post Brett Sutton: Why Nicola Spirig Is Racing Ironman Cozumel appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/race-coverage/brett-sutton-nicola-spirig-racing-ironman-cozumel_109950/feed 0
2014 Ironman Cozumel Professional Start List http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/news/2014-ironman-cozumel_109941 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/news/2014-ironman-cozumel_109941#comments Wed, 26 Nov 2014 17:10:47 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=109941

Weiss is coming off of a 16th-place finish in Kona. Photo: John David Becker

A sold-out field will be preparing to take on the 2014 Ironman Cozumel this Sunday, Nov. 30.

The post 2014 Ironman Cozumel Professional Start List appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>

Weiss is coming off of a 16th-place finish in Kona. Photo: John David Becker

As triathletes all over the United States will be recovering from the Thanksgiving holiday, a sold-out field will be preparing to take on the 2014 Ironman Cozumel this Sunday, Nov. 30. Austria’s Michael Weiss will return to defend his title, while the United States’ Jessie Donavan will be the top returning female with defending champion Rachel Joyce (GBR) choosing to prepare for Challenge Bahrain instead.

Weiss top competition will likely come from Viktor Zyemtsev (UKR), Victor Del Corral (ESP) and Matt Chrabot (USA). For the women, all eyes will be on 2012 Olympic gold medalist Nicola Spirig as she takes on her first Ironman ahead of a campaign to qualify for the 2016 Olympic team. Other top women competing include Kelly Williamson (USA), Michelle Vesterby (DEN), Erika Csomor (HUN) and Lucie Zelenkova (CZE).

See the complete professional start list below.

Men
1 Michael Weiss AUT
2 Viktor Zyemtsev UKR
3 Victor Del Corral ESP
4 Matt Russell USA
5 Clemente Alonso McKernan ESP
6 Matt Chrabot USA
7 Pedro Gomes POR
8 Maxim Kriat RUS
9 Bas Diederen NED
10 Trevor Delsaut FRA
11 Thomas Gerlach USA
13 Andriy Lyatskiy RUS
14 Michael Ruenz DEU
15 Francisco Serrano MEX
16 Todd Skipworth AUS
17 Rodrigo Acevedo COL
18 Peru Alfaro ESP
19 Stephen Bayliss GBR
20 Sebastian Bleisteiner DEU
21 Scott Bradley USA
22 James Brown GBR
23 Jordan Bryden CAN
24 Andres Castillo Latorre COL
25 Greg Close USA
26 Oliver Gonzalez MEX
27 Chad Holderbaum USA
28 Dan McIntosh USA
29 Marek Nemcik SVK
30 Sergio Quezada Ruiz MEX
31 Jason Smith USA
32 Christopher Sweet USA
33 Georg Swoboda AUT
34 Raul Tejada GTM
35 Darby Thomas FIN
36 Jorge Vazquez MEX
37 Allan Villanueva MEX
38 Jason Watson USA
39 Jonathan Shearon USA
40 Jim Lubinski USA
41 Gustavo Rodriguez ESP
42 Marcel Bischof DEU
43 Rene Vallant AUT

RELATED: Gold Medalist Nicola Spirig To Race First Ironman

Women
50 Jessie Donavan USA
51 Kelly Williamson USA
52 Michelle Vesterby DNK
53 Nicola Spirig CHE
54 Erika Csomor HUN
55 Lucie Zelenkova CZE
56 Celine Schaerer CHE
57 Diana Riesler DEU
58 Eimear Mullan IRL
59 Karen Thibodeau CAN
60 Anne Basso FRA
61 Ruth Brennan Morrey USA
62 Brooke Brown CAN
63 Ann Ciaverella USA
64 Jocelyn Cornman USA
65 Kelly Fillnow USA
66 Christine Fletcher CAN
67 Shannon Florea USA
68 Jacqui Gordon USA
70 Christine Hammond USA
71 Jennie Hansen USA
72 Helena Herrero Gomez ESP
73 Tine Holst DNK
74 Corrie Kristick USA
75 Mackenzie Madison USA
76 Ruth Nivon Machoud MEX
77 Tami Ritchie USA
78 Katie Thomas-Morales USA
79 Nicole Woysch DEU
80 Amy Javens USA

The post 2014 Ironman Cozumel Professional Start List appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/news/2014-ironman-cozumel_109941/feed 0
Breakfast With The Pros At Thanyapura http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/news/breakfast-pros-thanyapura_109936 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/news/breakfast-pros-thanyapura_109936#comments Wed, 26 Nov 2014 16:47:00 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=109936

See what some of the top athletes preparing to compete in Sunday's Challenge Laguna Phuket triathlon had to say.

The post Breakfast With The Pros At Thanyapura appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>

A second wave of professional athletes is arriving in town in Phuket, Thailand in advance of Sunday’s Challenge Laguna Phuket triathlon. Several of these athletes came together on Wednesday morning at Thanyapura, Phuket’s world-class multi-sport training center, for a breakfast and Q&A panel. The event was open to the public and emceed by a duo of Ironman champions, Jürgen Zack and Chris McCormack. Here’s a sampling of what the athletes had to say:

Rasmus Petræus (DEN)
On the best Phuket race strategy.

“I think it will all come down to the run and making sure to hydrate and cool down all along the way. Watch your pace so you don’t go out to hard in the beginning and then blow up. If you can stay on the bike [many age group athletes unclip and walk up the daunting hills] I think that would be important because it’s also not too easy to walk up them. You just have to try not to go too fast at the start of the hill. Take it at an even pace and just keep moving.”

Radka Vodickova (CZE)
On her Phuket preparation.

“I had a long season. I started racing in February and now it’s almost December. The preparation went good, but I’m not sure if the body still feels like really racing. But Phuket is my favorite race so I’ll just try and do my best here.”

On changes in her life since she raced here last year.
“I did two changes this year. I changed first my boyfriend and later my coach as well–so big changes! I’m happy!”

On her chances against rival Melissa Hauschildt.
“I think Mel is arriving tomorrow afternoon. Maybe if her bike doesn’t arrive I could beat her!”

Belinda Granger (AUS)
Her advice for Challenge Laguna Phuket rookies.

“Do not go out too quickly because I can guarantee you won’t come home too quickly! The heat and even more so the humidity will kill you. Make sure you’re drinking electrolytes all week, not just water. You’ll start suffering and cramping on the bike and the run if you do not hydrate enough. On the bike I would start with two bottles of electrolyte, and then you can get water out on the course. You can never get enough to drink here, especially enough electrolytes. I’ll go through four drink bottles on the bike this weekend. Also make sure you’ve got the right gearing. I’ve got a 28 and I’d use a triple if I could!”

On how to tackle the Phuket hills.
“The biggest problem is a lot of the hills have moss and are wet and slippery. You need to try and ride the hills in the saddle, otherwise your wheel will slip and you’ll fall off. I don’t actually need the 28 normally, but if it’s really slippery that’s why I have it–so I can stay in the saddle the whole time. For us pros the road is empty, but there are many more people in the age group so it gets crowded on the climbs and you don’t have the luxury of trying to weave across the road. If you do come off the bike, don’t stress about it. Just pop your shoes off, run up, put them back on and go.”

RELATED – Dispatch: Luke McKenzie Ready For Challenge Phuket

Parys Edwards (GBR)
On the challenge of going out too fast on the run.

“It’s a problem for me, too. Recently I had a race where I was in second off the bike and I was so excited because for the first time I had a bike marshal. I decided to go for it–and had the most spectacular explosion! Since then I’m totally reliant on my Garmin. With my coach I’ve set myself a pace and I have to stick to it. If you haven’t got a Garmin, you can use your heart rate, or you can use markers on the course like the aid stations or the kilometer markers. Plan the times that you should be at those markers and if you get there faster, make yourself back off.”

Patrik Nilsson (SWE)
On racing in Phuket on the heels of his success winning Ironman Malaysia.

“I’m really looking forward to it. I like racing in the heat. I enjoyed that in Malaysia, especially on the run, and I know it will be the same here. I will really try to drink a lot, especially electrolytes, because you have to in order to survive.”

Carole Fuchs (FRA)
A first-year pro, on her experience living and training in nearby Bangkok.

“Living and training in Bangkok is a bit difficult. It’s very polluted and you have to take a car to get to any bike venue. Always when I am in Bangkok I am thinking: When can I leave to go to the provinces or to go to Phuket? My job is sitting in an office for nine hours, working as a lawyer. Normally I would get up very early and train in the morning and then train again after work–so I would not be very fresh for work! But now I have managed to change it to part time, as my boss is very good and supportive of me, so I work and then come to Phuket for long weekends to train.”

Allen Steen Olesen (DEN)
On his transformation from a swimming background to a strong cyclist.

“The swimming background was way back for me and I was eight or nine kilos heavier. Now my coach has made me lose weight, so I’ve lost some of my swim fitness. It’s hard to keep when you don’t have as much power. As for the cycling, it’s not new for me. I grew up biking 20 kilometers each way every time I had to go to the pool. Then I really started riding more seriously when I was 15 years old and it’s been easy to increase that fitness.”

More Dispatch.

The post Breakfast With The Pros At Thanyapura appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/news/breakfast-pros-thanyapura_109936/feed 0
2014 Triathlete Gift Guide: $25 Or Less http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/triathlete-gift-guide/2014-triathlete-gift-guide-25-less_109615 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/triathlete-gift-guide/2014-triathlete-gift-guide-25-less_109615#comments Wed, 26 Nov 2014 16:10:25 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=109615

Gifts to fit any budget: $25 or less.

The post 2014 Triathlete Gift Guide: $25 Or Less appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>


Gifts to fit any budget: $25 or less.

Sock Guy I’m With Awesome Socks

($11, Sockguy.com)

Many triathletes aren’t lacking in the confidence department. These ultra-wicking crew socks just help broadcast your awesomeness.

The post 2014 Triathlete Gift Guide: $25 Or Less appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/triathlete-gift-guide/2014-triathlete-gift-guide-25-less_109615/feed 0
Swim Training: Pull Buoy Basics http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/training/swim-training-pull-buoy-basics_18810 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/training/swim-training-pull-buoy-basics_18810#comments Wed, 26 Nov 2014 15:45:21 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=18810

Photo: Nils Nilsen

Learn how a pull buoy can help you become a better swimmer.

The post Swim Training: Pull Buoy Basics appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>

Photo: Nils Nilsen

Learn how a pull buoy can help you become a better swimmer.

The pull buoy is a basic piece of swimming equipment used to improve a swimmer’s power. A buoy is typically held between the thighs to float the hips and legs at the surface of the water. The action of swimming with a buoy is called “pulling” because only the arms are used for forward momentum.

Triathletes can benefit from pulling during a workout (with or without hand paddles) to increase arm strength and upper body power. Any regular swimming set can be transformed into a pulling workout: long or short repetitions, fast or slow intervals, ladders or descending pace. Leg muscles consume significantly less oxygen while pulling, so hypoxic breathing sets can be easily incorporated. Athletes who still flutter kick with a buoy in place should use a band to strap their ankles together.

Using a pull buoy for more than one-third of total yardage, however, can be disadvantageous. Triathletes should train with naturally good body position in the water. Holding a buoy between the thighs or ankles causes swimmers to slightly arch their backs. This body position should be mimicked in regular swimming to keep the whole body horizontal at the surface, so use pull buoys only in moderation.

RELATED: Rethinking The Pull Buoy

RELATED – Coach Debate: How Often Should Swim Tools Be Used?

The post Swim Training: Pull Buoy Basics appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/training/swim-training-pull-buoy-basics_18810/feed 0
Dear Coach: How Do I Avoid Holiday Weight Gain? http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/nutrition/dear-coach-how-do-i-avoid-holiday-weight-gain_66158 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/nutrition/dear-coach-how-do-i-avoid-holiday-weight-gain_66158#comments Wed, 26 Nov 2014 14:01:03 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=66158

Photo: Shutterstock.com

There is a common misconception that weight gained during the off-season will come off naturally when exercise volume goes up in the spring.

The post Dear Coach: How Do I Avoid Holiday Weight Gain? appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>

Photo: Shutterstock.com

There is a common misconception that weight gained during the off-season will come off naturally when exercise volume goes up in the spring. Indeed, the widely held and little critiqued belief that triathlon training naturally leads to weight loss is so pervasive that many people believe it even when their own experience proves otherwise. Recent attention has been given to the topic of exercise and weight loss in the popular press over the past year, and the new line of thought reflects the experience of many triathletes: exercise has many benefits, but weight loss isn’t one of them.

What does this mean for dealing with off-season weight gain? Primarily it means you shouldn’t rely on an increase in training volume to lose weight. Second, it means that the best time for you to lose weight may be during the off-season when exercise volume is lower, not the beginning of the training season when volume goes up. When training volume goes up, your body automatically adapts and your hunger goes up, too. If you are trying to create a calorie deficit to lose weight, it can help to keep exercise to a moderate level so hunger stays in check.

Additionally, your diet should be periodized just like your swim, bike and run training. Your nutrition needs vary a great deal based on where in the season you are, and failure to adjust calories and macronutrient ratios is a primary cause of that dreaded 10–20 pound off-season gain.

RELATED: Six Healthful Hints To Get You Through The Holidays

It’s only November, so there is plenty of time to avoid holiday weight gain before it starts. The simplest way to do this is to focus on a few dietary and behavioral changes:

  1. Many people underestimate how much they are eating. Use an online calorie tracker like the ones on Myfitnesspal.com  or Loseit.com (or the one on the Triathlete.com nutrition page). Even using a calculator for one week can be very eye-opening and can help moderate food intake.
  2. Lower your intake of grains and other high carbohydrate foods. You don’t need them to fuel high amounts of exercise right now, and you can get all the nutrition you need with protein, fruit, vegetables and healthy fats. This simple adjustment is a quick and effective way to drop calories while also increasing satiety through added fats and protein so you can diet without hunger. Remember, a high carbohydrate diet may serve you well in season, but if you can’t burn all that quick energy you eat, it gets stored as fat.
  3. Keep volume low but add intensity to workouts. Adding short, high intensity work can help with fat loss. Instead of a one-hour endurance ride, try an interval-based one-hour ride on the trainer. A main set for this type of workout might be 6×4 minutes at Zone 4 with 2-minute recoveries.

Bottom line: Don’t try to force weight loss with increased exercise, as you may end up doing more exercise than needed in the off-season, which could derail your success next season. Instead, periodize your nutrition to reflect your lowered energy needs.

Jessica Herschberg is a USAT Level I coach, certified sports nutritionist and mother of four in Nashville, Tenn. Find out more at her coaching website: Ftpcoaching.com.

RELATED: Enjoy The Off-Season, But Don’t Regret It

The post Dear Coach: How Do I Avoid Holiday Weight Gain? appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/nutrition/dear-coach-how-do-i-avoid-holiday-weight-gain_66158/feed 0
One-Hour Workout: Build Bike Base Plus Strength Session http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/training/one-hour-workout-build-bike-base-plus-strength-session_109880 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/training/one-hour-workout-build-bike-base-plus-strength-session_109880#comments Tue, 25 Nov 2014 20:39:16 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=109880

Photo: Shutterstock.com

This creative bike session will allow you to get strong and build base endurance at the same time.

The post One-Hour Workout: Build Bike Base Plus Strength Session appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Every Tuesday we’ll feature a different coach’s workout you can complete in 60 minutes (or less!).

This week’s strength and bike combo workout comes from coach Dan Nascimento of Pacific Swim Bike Run in Stamford, Conn. He believes there are three things you should do over the winter months—build strength, build base endurance and build muscle resilience and strength endurance to prepare for race-specific training. He says this strength and bike combo workout does all three at the same time.

“Your heart rate will remain at the endurance base level the whole 60 minutes, and as the workout progresses there will be a higher demand on your musculature due to the strength work,” Nascimento says. “This will allow you to get strong and build base endurance at the same time. Not to mention fight the boredom of 60 minutes on a turbo trainer at a low heart rate. The purpose of this workout is to keep an aerobic heart rate for the 60 minutes.”

You will need: dumbbells, resistance band, indoor bike trainer

Warm-up: 10 minutes on trainer at endurance/aerobic/base pace, building heart rate or power for the duration (note heart rate). By the time you get back on the bike for each set, your HR should be pretty similar.

RELATED: Bike Intervals And Core Work In One Session 

First set (2 minutes):

• Step-back lunges with dumbbells
Do 3 sets total: Holding a dumbbell sideways with two hands at your chest, do 10 reps on each leg, switching between legs (20 total). Focus on a tight core and a vertical back—do not lean forward.

Step-back lunge video here.
Advanced version (holding weight overhead) here.

Back on the bike for 8 minutes.

Second set (2 minutes):

• Core punches
Do 3 sets total: 10 regular core punches, 10 reverse core punches. Switch hands and repeat. Focus on keeping a slow, controlled pace.

o Attach a resistance band to a solid object at 4 inches below chest height (you could also use a pulley at the gym). Put one leg in front of the other but keep them shoulder-width apart. For regular punches, grab the cord with your rear hand, and punch in front of your body and away from the object it’s anchored to. Keep it close to your chest and rotate from the core.

o For reverse punches, face the anchored object and pull the band back behind you.

Core punch video here.
Reverse core punch video here.

Back on the bike for 8 minutes.

Third set (2 minutes):

Weighted hip lifts to single legged hip lifts
Do 3 sets total: 10 double-legged weighted hip lifts into one set of 5 hip lifts on each leg

o Lie on your back with heels close to your behind, grab a weight you can handle for 10 reps and place it on your hips. Squeeze your butt to lift as high as possible, ideally creating a 90-degree angle.

o After the 10th rep, drop the weight and continue into 5 single-legged lifts (take one leg off the ground)

Weighted hip lift video here.
Single leg hip lift here.

Back on the bike for 8 minutes.

Fourth set (2 minutes):

Side plank with dumbbell lifts into front plank
Grab a light weight (5 lbs or less) and do this 3 times total: 30 seconds left plank, 30 seconds right plank, 30 seconds front plank. For the side planks, hold the weight in the opposite hand and dip your hip to the ground with it at your side, then above (perpendicular to your body) as you lift your hips to a taut position.

Side planks with dumbbell lifts video here.

Back on the bike for 8 minutes.

Fifth Set (2 minutes):

Push-ups
Do 3 sets of 10 push-ups.

Push-ups video here.

**Bonus round! Do 8 minutes on the bike and then cycle through 1 round of 10 repetitions of each set 1–5.

More one-hour workouts.

The post One-Hour Workout: Build Bike Base Plus Strength Session appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/training/one-hour-workout-build-bike-base-plus-strength-session_109880/feed 0
2014 ITU Photos Of The Year: Yokohama http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/photos/2014-itu-photos-year-yokohama_109869 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/photos/2014-itu-photos-year-yokohama_109869#comments Tue, 25 Nov 2014 17:06:19 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=109869

Get a look at eight of the top photos from the 2014 ITU World Triathlon Series Yokohama, which took place back in May.

The post 2014 ITU Photos Of The Year: Yokohama appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>

Get a look at eight of the top photos from the 2014 ITU World Triathlon Series Yokohama, which took place back in May.

RELATED PHOTOS: Jorgensen Back On Top In Yokohama

Vote for your favorite at Triathlon.org.

The post 2014 ITU Photos Of The Year: Yokohama appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/photos/2014-itu-photos-year-yokohama_109869/feed 0
Eat And Run: The Sweet Benefits Of Chocolate http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/nutrition/eat-and-run-chocolate_5731 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/nutrition/eat-and-run-chocolate_5731#comments Tue, 25 Nov 2014 17:00:59 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/2011/02/videos/eat-and-run-chocolate_6662

Photo: www.shutterstock.com

It's OK to indulge a little during this holiday season. Dr. John Berardi discusses the benefits of chocolate for endurance athletes.

The post Eat And Run: The Sweet Benefits Of Chocolate appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>

Photo: www.shutterstock.com

It’s OK to indulge a little during this holiday season. Dr. John Berardi discusses the benefits of chocolate for endurance athletes.

More “Eat and Run” videos from Triathlete.com.

We’ve gone digital! Sign up for a digital subscription of Triathlete to get our monthly issues for your digital device. In addition to the regular monthly content you’ll get exclusive videos, photos and more embedded in your issue.

The post Eat And Run: The Sweet Benefits Of Chocolate appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/nutrition/eat-and-run-chocolate_5731/feed 0
Dispatch: Beth Gerdes’ Tips For Getting Back In Shape http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/training/dispatch-beth-gerdes-tips-getting-back-shape_109865 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/training/dispatch-beth-gerdes-tips-getting-back-shape_109865#comments Tue, 25 Nov 2014 16:23:12 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=109865

Beth and baby Wynne.

Pro triathlete Beth Gerdes shares her tips for a healthy return to fitness post-pregnancy.

The post Dispatch: Beth Gerdes’ Tips For Getting Back In Shape appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>

Beth and baby Wynne.

Beth Gerdes proudly sports several titles these days–pro triathlete, coach and, most importantly, Mom. Along with boyfriend Luke Mckenzie, Gerdes welcomed daughter Wynne in May of this year. Less than four months later she stepped up to the line at Ironman Malaysia where she scored an impressive fifth place. She also earned sixth at the recent UWC Bahamas Tri. This week, Gerdes and baby Wynne are in Phuket, Thailand to support McKenzie’s bid for the Challenge Laguna Phuket title, as well as to enjoy the much-touted hospitality and luxury of the Banyan Tree Laguna Phuket Resort. I grabbed the opportunity to chat with Gerdes in order to learn her tips for a healthy return to fitness post-pregnancy.

Triathlete.com: First, congrats on your success in your return to racing! You’ve had some excellent results and you certainly look lean and fit and strong. I’m sure a lot of women would appreciate hearing your advice for a healthy return to fitness post-pregnancy–advice that can probably also apply to anyone whose fitness has lapsed. What helped you get back in shape so quickly?

BG: Thank You! Returning to racing was something I wanted to do fairly quickly (at 34, I’m not getting any younger!), but also safely. In order to return quickly after pregnancy, the most important thing I did was to keep fit during my pregnancy. I did not subscribe to any crazy training schedule while I was pregnant, but I did make sure to keep exercising at low intensity in swim, bike, run and strength one to two hours per day throughout my pregnancy. I did take days off here and there whenever I didn’t feel good, but overall, I just listened to my body and kept moving. Keeping that baseline of general fitness really helped me when I returned to actual “training” six weeks postpartum. I didn’t have to start totally from scratch and was able to build upon my base fairly quickly. One thing I did learn, though, was that I needed more recovery than I had in the past. The combination of sleep deprivation and breastfeeding made me quite tired even before adding in workouts, so I really did not beat myself up that I needed complete rest days every week instead of maybe one per month as I had taken prior to having baby Wynne. My other big tip is to keep a strength routine in both pregnancy and postpartum. I do functional strength workouts at Rehab United Sports Performance Center two times a week, and I did this throughout my pregnancy and postpartum. Having strength and muscular balance are both key to returning to fitness without injury. Your body changes structurally when you have a baby and you need to make sure to strengthen key areas (hips, pelvic floor, abs) and focus on functional movement to avoid developing poor biomechanical habits that put you at risk for injury.

RELATED – Dispatch: Luke McKenzie Ready For Challenge Phuket

Triathlete.com: Your lifestyle is very much on the move. How do you keep on top of good nutrition with traveling so much and in general having a busy schedule and an infant to look after? What are some of your favorite easy to make meals and on-the-go snacks?

BG: Good nutrition has certainly been a challenge since having a baby. Typically, I come in from a tough workout and instead of making myself a recovery meal, I need to breastfeed Wynne right away, which can take 30-40 minutes–that critical refueling window! Luckily, Luke is sponsored by chocolate milk, so I admit to stealing from his stash for a quick mix of protein and carbs post-workout until I can get into the kitchen an hour or two later. We have traveled a lot since having Wynne. By five months old she had already been to France, Switzerland, Germany, Oregon, Hawaii and the Bahamas. When traveling, I pack some healthy snacks like apples and almonds and also Bonk Breakers for snacks on flights. Bonk Breaker has a new High Protein Cookies & Cream bar that tastes amazing and is also gluten free and made with real ingredients, so I like snacking on those. I need to constantly be getting enough good calories to fuel my workouts, but also to make enough milk for Wynne! When I’m at home or have access to a kitchen, I love making quick egg scrambles with lots of veggies and topped with avocado. My go-to five-minute carb/protein fix is a microwaved sweet potato topped with cottage cheese and a drizzle of maple syrup.

Triathlete.com: With both you and Luke training, I imagine you have to juggle your schedules a bit so that each of you can get in the training you need while also taking care of Wynne. Do you ever struggle with training at certain times of day, and if so, how do you make sure you’re ready to go and get the most out of yourself whenever those windows of time open up?

BG: This has been a big adjustment. We have had family (namely Luke’s sister Jacque) helping us since Wynne’s birth, so Luke and I can often train together, but when they are not around we definitely do a lot of tag-teaming. When Luke was preparing for Ironman Hawaii and I was preparing for Ironman Malaysia, we decided as a family that his race and training was the absolute priority, since it was the world championships and he had a shot at winning. I would often get the “leftover” training time, which might be a quick 45 minutes before dinner or some other sub-optimal training window. I do struggle with training in the evening, but when you have an infant, your body clock is all out of whack anyway and you just make it work. There is no more messing around and if you find a window to get out the door, you take it! Recently, as I’ve been preparing for Ironman Western Australia and Luke has been preparing for Challenge Laguna Phuket, he has had fewer training hours. A couple times he’s been Mr. Mom as I’ve gone out for a longer workout. It’s really cute–he takes Wynne to the coffee shop and dresses her in cute outfits. He is a great Dad and loves it.

Triathlete.com: What’s next for you–and what are your long-term athletic goals? 

BG: Ironman Western Australia on Dec. 7! My long-term goals are to qualify for Kona in 2015 and to win an Ironman in the next one to two years. Simple, right? You can keep up with our racing, training and travels on my blog, which can be accessed through Bethgerdes.com.

More Dispatch.

The post Dispatch: Beth Gerdes’ Tips For Getting Back In Shape appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/training/dispatch-beth-gerdes-tips-getting-back-shape_109865/feed 0
2014 Triathlete Gift Guide: Customize It http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/triathlete-gift-guide/2014-triathlete-gift-guide-customize_109594 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/triathlete-gift-guide/2014-triathlete-gift-guide-customize_109594#comments Tue, 25 Nov 2014 15:30:16 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=109594

Photo: John David Becker

Made-to-order presents to thrill any multisport enthusiast.

The post 2014 Triathlete Gift Guide: Customize It appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>

Photo: John David Becker


Made-to-order presents to thrill any multisport enthusiast.

TYR Special Ops 2.0 Goggles

$30, Tyr.com

There are nine decisions to be made when customizing a pair of these editor-favored goggles, including frame pattern (leopard, anyone?), lens color (with a number of mirrored options) and strap hue. There’s even the option to include a laser etching on the outer lens.

The post 2014 Triathlete Gift Guide: Customize It appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/triathlete-gift-guide/2014-triathlete-gift-guide-customize_109594/feed 0
5 Reasons To Try Trail Running http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/training/5-reasons-try-trail-running_109850 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/training/5-reasons-try-trail-running_109850#comments Tue, 25 Nov 2014 12:59:58 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=109850

Photo: XTERRA

Trail running is distinctly different from running the roads, treadmill or track.

The post 5 Reasons To Try Trail Running appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>

Photo: XTERRA

Ever consider racing an off-road triathlon? You should! Gain new fitness and have some serious fun by taking to the trails. Everything you need to know is inside our Ultimate Guide to Off-road Triathlon. Get this special digital-only issue today by downloading the Triathlete app here and read an excerpt from the guide below.

Whether you’re going for a run in your local wooded park or negotiating rugged single-track in the mountains, trail running is distinctly different from running the roads, treadmill or track. If you’ve never given trail running a try, now’s the time. Here are some reasons you should head out into the wild, with some tips to get you started.

Long, uninterrupted runs. For a long base or endurance run, nothing beats a stretch of trail. No traffic lights, no intersections and long sections of trail all create a continuous aerobic session. Without the distractions that come with road running, you can easily get into a groove, paying attention to your body, breathing and running efficiency.

Softer surfaces. Training as much as you can on softer surfaces can help prevent injuries and allow faster recovery for your next workout.

Natural fartlek. A hilly trail run will create much greater variations in heart rate than a flat run. This natural fartlek offers a nice mental break from structured intervals, but also builds your endurance threshold and mental strength, not to mention your prowess as an uphill bunny.

Agility and focus. Running on trails requires focus and concentration, especially on single-track or uneven terrain. Paying attention to the way your body moves and works makes you a stronger runner. (Plus, successful rock hopping makes you feel young and sprightly!)

Strengthening the stabilizing muscles. There is more lateral motion involved in trail running, with the body having to use the stabilizer muscles and tendons of the ankles, lower legs and core for balance. When added to your overall training program, this type of running gives you well-rounded, functional strength.

RELATED: Lesley Paterson’s 12 Trail Running Tips

Before you head into the wild …

•Urban trails and parks are a great place to start; they are generally well maintained. Start with one or two shorter base runs a week to get used to the feeling of running on uneven ground—like any new activity, a little restraint at first goes a long way in preventing injury.

• While some trails are marked with distance so you can keep track of your mileage, doing a timed out-and-back loop will ensure you don’t end up on an epic two-hour adventure run on your first time out. A GPS comes in handy in the woods, as you can keep track of your mileage and pace where there are no markers for reference. As you increase the range of your workouts in the trails, a GPS allows you to maintain pace and/or heart rate for training specific energy systems.

• A trail running shoe provides more traction and protection from rocks, roots and puddles than a regular sneaker. If you’re going to commit to longer or more extreme trail running, a good trail shoe will provide more comfort and better function, which can help reduce fatigue over the course of a long run.

LifeSport head coach Lance Watson has coached a number of Ironman, Olympic and age-group champions. Visit Lifesportcoaching.com or write Coach@Lifesportcoaching.com.

RELATED: How To Tackle The Trails In Winter Conditions

The post 5 Reasons To Try Trail Running appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/training/5-reasons-try-trail-running_109850/feed 0
Ask Coach Sara: Overcoming Fear Of Jellyfish http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/training/ask-coach-sara-overcoming-fear-jellyfish_109847 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/training/ask-coach-sara-overcoming-fear-jellyfish_109847#comments Mon, 24 Nov 2014 21:15:41 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=109847

Photo: Stefan Holm / Shutterstock.com

Your Twitter questions about swimming as a triathlete, answered by coach and professional triathlete Sara McLarty.

The post Ask Coach Sara: Overcoming Fear Of Jellyfish appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>

Photo: Stefan Holm / Shutterstock.com

Your Twitter questions about swimming as a triathlete, answered by coach and professional triathlete Sara McLarty.

Q: Do you also have fears of jellyfish? What do I do if I’m stung? -@KackieMonster

A: Jellyfish are an obvious worry for triathletes who race and train primarily in the ocean. Pay attention to the lifeguard towers for warnings, and don’t be shy about asking the guards on duty at the races. You can protect most of your body from stings by wearing a wetsuit or other full-sleeve/leg suit. Most of the time, you can continue swimming after a light sting. If you think you made contact with a particularly venomous specimen, swim to shore and seek medical attention.

RELATED: Dealing With Unexpected Open-Water Swim Scenarios

Q: What are some drills to help get a beginner swimmer’s legs up near the surface? –@victoriawardle

A: Most often, the source of the problem stems from the upper-body position. Practice floating on the surface of the water to learn how to hold your body horizontally. See how your body reacts when you try to hold your head too high and when you force your head too deep. Relax your arms so they rest 4–6 inches below the surface of the water. Hold your breath for a few seconds and use your core strength to remain afloat.

RELATED: Priority One For Swimmers – Get Level

Q: Are long, uninterrupted swim sets helpful when training for an [Ironman] or are shorter 200–400s better? –@trimomrun

A: Variety is the spice of life, and it is also the best way to approach Ironman training. If you swim three times per week, make one session distance, the second speed and the third technique. Focus on pacing and endurance on the distance day with sets of 500s, 1000s and even 1500s. On the speed day, focus on anaerobic work like sets of 50s and 100s above race effort, with short rest. The technique day should involve minimal time on intervals and maximum focus on improving your stroke efficiency.

RELATED – One-Hour Workout: Train For Your Swim Race Distance

Q: Is it better to train with or without fins? –@JEatonTri

A: Swim fins are a great tool to use to get faster. They can strengthen and improve your kick, provide momentum when focusing on technique and drills, and teach you how to maintain a horizontal body position. I recommend that you use fins once or twice a week during drills for no more than 1,000 yards.

More “Ask Coach Sara.”

Pro triathlete and swim coach Sara McLarty has 25-plus years of experience and knowledge about swimming mechanics, efficiency and technique. Got a swimming question? Coach Sara wants to help. Just tweet your queries to @SaraLMcLarty.

The post Ask Coach Sara: Overcoming Fear Of Jellyfish appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/training/ask-coach-sara-overcoming-fear-jellyfish_109847/feed 0
Is The Future Of Ironman Coeur d’Alene In Jeopardy? http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/news/future-ironman-coeur-dalene-jeopardy_109844 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/news/future-ironman-coeur-dalene-jeopardy_109844#comments Mon, 24 Nov 2014 20:56:22 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=109844

Age groupers spread across Lake Coeur d'Alene at June's race. Photo: Rocky Arroyo/Endurapix.com

According to a local news report, the Coeur d'Alene Chambers of Commerce is questioning whether it will continue to support the Ironman.

The post Is The Future Of Ironman Coeur d’Alene In Jeopardy? appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>

Age groupers spread across Lake Coeur d'Alene at June's race. Photo: Rocky Arroyo/Endurapix.com

According to a local news report, the Coeur d’Alene Chambers of Commerce is questioning whether it will continue to support Ironman Coeur d’Alene.

The Coeur d’Alene Chambers of Commerce is considering ending its sponsorship with the Ironman race after either the 2016 or 2017 race. The Chamber officials said it is becoming too expensive to put on the race and without their sponsorship the race could not happen. In order for the Ironman race to come to a city, an entity within the city must step forward as a main sponsor and pay for it.

The Ironman race costs hundreds of thousands of dollars and is pretty significant for a city of Coeur d’Alene’s size according to the Coeur d’Alene chamber president. But businesses around the area also help cover the cost of the race.

“To see the Ironman go away, I think it would be disappointing,” said Mary Riffe, the Resort City Inn manager. “On the other hand, there’s always the financial part of it.”

Riffe said her hotel pitched in a little money each year for the race, but added that more local businesses and even the Ironman organization itself should help out more.

Read more and watch a news segment about this topic at Krem.com.

RELATED PHOTOS: 2014 Ironman Coeur d’Alene

The post Is The Future Of Ironman Coeur d’Alene In Jeopardy? appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/news/future-ironman-coeur-dalene-jeopardy_109844/feed 0
How To Change Your Diet In The Off-Season http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/nutrition/change-diet-season_109841 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/nutrition/change-diet-season_109841#comments Mon, 24 Nov 2014 20:45:05 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=109841

If your training volume has come way down, consider doing things like eat half to three-quarters of your usual bowl of oatmeal with the same amount of fruit or nuts. Photo: Shutterstock.com

In the off-season your needs may come down by 500–1,000 calories per day, to a more “normal” range.

The post How To Change Your Diet In The Off-Season appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>

If your training volume has come way down, consider doing things like eat half to three-quarters of your usual bowl of oatmeal with the same amount of fruit or nuts. Photo: Shutterstock.com

What are the major changes I should be making to my diet as I transition to the off-season and reduce training volume?  

A: During in-season training, triathletes may need to take in 2,600–4,000 (or more!) calories, with at least 400–500 grams of carbohydrate daily. In the off-season your needs may come down by 500–1,000 calories per day, to a more “normal” range, depending on how much exercise you will be doing. Additionally, your protein and fat needs diminish slightly to accommodate less muscle recovery needs and total calorie needs; however, your decreased need for carbs is the most pronounced.

One simple way to start thinking about and changing your intake now is to cut your in-season portions of carbohydrate by 25–50 percent (again, depending on your decrease in training activity). An example of this over the course of a day would be to eat half to three-quarters of your usual bowl of oatmeal with the same amount of fruit or nuts, switch up your mid-morning bagel or muffin snack for a large piece of fruit, decrease both your lunch and dinner portions of pasta, potato, quinoa or rice by 25–50 percent, and your mid-afternoon snack should decrease from a whole to half sandwich or from three handfuls of crackers or pretzels to two. You should also reduce your protein and fat intake at lunch and/or dinner by about one-fourth. Bonus points if you add more salad or vegetables. Final note: Although the triathlon off-season generally corresponds with the holiday splurge season, try to choose your treats wisely and resist the urge to blow off your healthy eating until January. You will feel better over the holidays, keep your immunity up and start the 2015 triathlon season off on the right foot.

RELATED: Enjoy The Off-Season, But Don’t Regret It

Lauren Antonucci, R.D., is a board-certified specialist in sports dietetics, three-time Ironman finisher and the founding director of Nutrition Energy in New York City.

More Nutrition Q&A.

The post How To Change Your Diet In The Off-Season appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/nutrition/change-diet-season_109841/feed 0
Photos: 2014 Laguna Phuket Triathlon http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/photos/photos-2014-laguna-phuket-triathlon_109813 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/photos/photos-2014-laguna-phuket-triathlon_109813#comments Mon, 24 Nov 2014 18:34:26 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=109813

A field of more than 1200 individual athletes from 47 countries, plus 65 relay teams competed in the iconic event.

The post Photos: 2014 Laguna Phuket Triathlon appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>

Photos provided by Laguna Phuket Triathlon.

After a night punctuated by rain, thunder and lightning, race morning dawned clear and the stage was set for sweltering hot and humid conditions in the 21st edition of the Laguna Phuket Triathlon in Phuket, Thailand. A field of more than 1200 individual athletes from 47 countries, plus 65 relay teams competed in the iconic event. The bike course, known for its quad-busting hill climbs, had to be altered slightly from prior years, as areas of road construction and damage from recent storms had all but obliterated certain sections of road. The amended course, which maintained the entire stretch of hills, was actually 50km (as opposed to the usual 55km), however organizers estimated that bike split times would be comparable to the race’s usual distance, given the highly technical nature of the new portion of the course, which contained numerous twisty sharp turns and a few additional small hills.

The men’s professional race marked two significant firsts in the history of the storied event–the first dual champions and the first four-time winner. Massimo Cigana (ITA), known equally for his stylish dress as for his success in Thailand, proudly claimed an unprecedented fourth victory (he also won in 2008, 2010 and 2011), an honor he shared with countryman Alberto Casadei (ITA). The two arrived to the finish chute together and, rather than sprint it out in a duel to the line they hoisted an Italian flag in unison to the delight of the crowds, running to the finish along with Kandi the baby elephant to finish in 2:33:57. In the women’s race, rookie pro Parys Edwards (GBR) earned her own important first–her number one professional win. Edwards crossed the line ahead of veteran pro Belinda Granger (AUS), who marked her 12th and final professional appearance in Phuket.

Read the complete race recap.

The post Photos: 2014 Laguna Phuket Triathlon appeared first on Triathlete.com.

]]>
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/photos/photos-2014-laguna-phuket-triathlon_109813/feed 0