Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com Triathlon Training, Gear, Nutrition, Photos, Race Results & Calendars Fri, 28 Aug 2015 13:33:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0.1 Javier Gomez On 70.3 Worlds: “I Came Here To Have Fun” http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/video/javier-gomez-on-70-3-worlds-i-came-here-to-have-fun_121346 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/video/javier-gomez-on-70-3-worlds-i-came-here-to-have-fun_121346#comments Fri, 28 Aug 2015 13:17:00 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=121346

Straight off his WTS win in Stockholm, Javier Gomez talks about his relaxed approach to defending his title at Sunday's 70.3 worlds.

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Straight off his WTS win in Stockholm, Javier Gomez talks about his relaxed approach to defending his title at Sunday’s 70.3 worlds.

RELATED PHOTOS: Javier Gomez Dominates WTS Stockholm

RELATED – 2015 Ironman 70.3 World Championship Preview: The Men 

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Daniela Ryf: Going After The Double http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/features/daniela-ryf-going-after-the-double_121335 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/features/daniela-ryf-going-after-the-double_121335#comments Fri, 28 Aug 2015 12:48:58 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=121335

Ryf was dominant at July's Ironman European Championship. Photo: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image

Can Swiss star Daniela Ryf win both Kona and 70.3 worlds this year?

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Ryf was dominant at July's Ironman European Championship. Photo: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image

Can Swiss star Daniela Ryf win both Kona and 70.3 worlds this year? 

Daniela Ryf, last year’s Ironman 70.3 world champion, never imagined success at the Ironman distance would come so quickly. “I was a bit surprised,” admits the modest 28-year-old who arrived on the Big Island for the first time last October, led the women’s race on the Queen K Highway for most of the day and ended up as the runner-up in the 2014 Ironman World Championship. “I was always interested to see what I could do in long course, but I was never planning to do it this quickly.”

A short-course specialist with two Olympic appearances, Ryf had hopes at the end of 2013 to qualify for another spot on the Swiss Olympic team when her new coach, Brett Sutton, convinced her to pursue a different path.

“Brett told me quite quickly that long distance would be good for me and that’s why last year we changed the whole plan,” she says. “The goal last year was just to do 70.3 worlds in Canada. But through the season he changed things around and suddenly he was talking about Kona and that’s why I did it. He was kind of forcing me a little bit and told me I should take the chance.”

As an ITU athlete, Ryf represented Switzerland in the 2008 and 2012 Olympics, finishing seventh in Beijing and 40th in London. In 2010, she was third in the inaugural ITU Sprint Distance Triathlon World Championships.

A strong swimmer-cyclist, Ryf’s running times could occasionally match the best ITU athletes in the world. But although she never developed into an Olympic medal contender, Darren Smith, who coached Sweden’s Lisa Norden to a silver medal in the London Olympics, noticed a few things about Ryf when he coached her to her best Olympic finish in 2008.

“Truth be told,” says Smith about Ryf’s rare cycling strength and ability to suffer, “we didn’t do much riding. She had a massive turn of speed, but also a body type that was very robust and did not injure easily. … She is one of the best athletes I have ever worked with—period.” Another mark of her champion pedigree, Smith says, is her ability to perform when it counts. “I’ve only met a handful of them and they are ferocious racers who are tactically astute and deliver amazing things,” adds Smith. “All said and done, [she was] the perfect athlete to step up to long course when the time was right.”

Norden, a long-time friend and former training partner, isn’t surprised that Ryf has adapted so well to the iron distance. “I rarely get challenged on the bike in training,” she says, “but Daniela is the one who has made me suffer at times. She is one of the strongest girls I know in a no-fuss-just-get-this-done kind of way.”

With Sutton’s guidance and prodding, Ryf did her first Ironman last July at Ironman Switzerland in Zurich. She won handily in 9:13, 15 minutes faster than the second-place finisher, six-time Ironman world champion Natascha Badmann, the original Swiss Miss of Ironman.

RELATED – PROfile: Daniela Ryf

“I was quite scared actually,” Ryf admits. “But Brett just said my body is made for Ironman because I’m quite strong, I’m a good cyclist and I can still run well off a hard bike. This was always a real challenge for me in the [ITU] World Cup races because if you’re a good cyclist sometimes it doesn’t really matter and you just have to be fast [on] the run. I’ve never been super fast, but I can hold a good pace for a long time, and that’s a big thing for Ironman. After Zurich, I started to realize this distance suits me quite well and then I really started to enjoy it.”

Ryf’s quick success at the highest levels of Ironman competition brings obvious comparisons to four-time Ironman world champion Chrissie Wellington, who was also guided by Sutton and whom Ryf considers her inspiration.

“I actually don’t know Chrissie,” Ryf says, “but she was in Kona last year cheering for me on the run, so that was quite inspirational. I have a lot of respect for her and what she did.”

Will Ryf become the next Chrissie Wellington? Can she win both this year’s Ironman 70.3 World Championship and the Ironman World Championship—a double achieved by only one other female athlete, Leanda Cave, in 2012?

Her coach is taking a wait-and-see approach. “I keep away from comparisons until they start winning the big ones,” Sutton says. “Yes, Dani has huge potential. For now it’s up to her to continue to improve and use it.”

Except for a longer build-up for Kona, Sutton says that there’s not much he’ll change in Ryf’s training this summer after the Ironman European Championship in Frankfurt, Germany, which she won in July with a course record-setting 8:51:00. Their summer training base in the alpine village of St. Moritz, Switzerland, should prepare her well for the mountainous terrain of 70.3 worlds in Zell Am See, Austria.

“Dani just needs to continue what she did last year,” he says. “Her race [at Kona] was brilliant and one of the best debut performances we’ve ever seen. She had a couple of mental downs at critical periods. However, we are working at making sure that we have improved in these areas.”

Ryf bonked and cramped coming out of the Energy Lab with 12 kilometers to go in the marathon after she went too quickly through the aid stations and dropped two bars and two gels, a critical mistake she says she won’t make again this year.

Her goal in Kona after what she hopes will be another success at the Ironman 70.3 World Championship is simple: To have a “Chrissie-like” ride on the Kona bike course, then back it up with a much faster marathon than last year’s 3:07. “I want to have a marathon where I can look back and think, ‘Whoa, I felt good.’ That’s my goal.” she says. “Then I think anything will be possible.”

RELATED – 2015 Ironman 70.3 World Championship Preview: The Women

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Quick Set Friday: Mixed Bag http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/training/quick-set-friday-mixed-bag_56861 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/training/quick-set-friday-mixed-bag_56861#comments Fri, 28 Aug 2015 12:30:01 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=56861

Photo: Shutterstock.com

A fun, creative workout to take to the pool this weekend.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

Triathlete contributor and swimming all-star Sara McLarty has a blog with more than 500 creative workouts used in her Masters swim program in Clermont, Fla. We’ll feature a workout every Friday so you have new ideas to take to the pool. On her blog (Mastersswimworkoutsbysaramclarty.blogspot.com), you can pick a Monday set for a long distance focus, a Wednesday set for sprint training, or Friday for creative open water skills.

The A sets are between 4–5000 yards total, with intervals ranging from 1:20–1:30 per 100. The B sets are 3000–3500 total, with intervals of 1:50–2:00 per 100. The C sets are 2000–2500 total and all based on a rest interval.

**Long Course Meters**

A:
600 warm up (200 swim/100 kick, repeat)
6×50 @ :60 (descend stroke count 1-6)
6×50 @ :55 (25 sprint/25 easy)
3 x [4×50 FAST!! @ 1:10
200 easy pull recovery]
6×150 @ 2:30 (25 fly/25 back/25 breast/75 free)
2×300 w/:20 rest (100 swim/50 kick, repeat)
200 cool down
*4100 Total*

RELATED – Ask Coach Sara: Drills To Help With Open-Water Swimming

B:
600 warm up (200 swim/100 kick, repeat)
6×50 @ 1:10 (descend stroke count 1-6)
6×50 @ 1:10 (25 sprint/25 easy)
3 x [4×50 FAST!! @ 1:30
200 easy pull recovery]
4×150 @ 3:15 (50 free/50 non-free/50 free)
200 cool down
*3200 Total*

RELATED – Ask Coach Sara: Returning To Swimming After A Break

C:
600 warm up (200 swim/100 kick, repeat)
6×50 w/:15 rest (descend stroke count 1-6)
6×50 w/:20 rest (25 sprint/25 easy)
2 x [4×50 FAST!! w/:30 rest
200 easy pull recovery]
2×150 @ 3:15 (50 free/50 non-free/50 free)
100 cool down
*2400 Total*

More “Quick Set Friday” workouts from McLarty.

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Video: Terenzo Bozzone Targeting 2nd 70.3 World Title http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/video/video-terenzo-bozzone-targeting-2nd-70-3-world-title_121337 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/video/video-terenzo-bozzone-targeting-2nd-70-3-world-title_121337#comments Fri, 28 Aug 2015 02:19:05 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=121337

It's been nearly seven years since Bozzone won his first Ironman 70.3 World Championship in Clearwater, Fla.

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On the heels of his win at Ironman 70.3 Budapest, Bozzone is going after a second Ironman 70.3 world title in Zel am See, Austria. It’s been nearly seven years since Bozzone won his first Ironman 70.3 World Championship in Clearwater, Fla. in 2008 and he says he’s ready to be competitive against a tough field on Sunday. Bozzone also reveals that this race will double as the second race of the Triple Crown Series, meaning that the world title win would get him one step closer to the million-dollar Triple Crown prize purse. He and Daniela Ryf won Challenge Dubai, the first race in the series.

 

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Video: Jodie Swallow Talks 2015 Setbacks Ahead Of 70.3 Worlds http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/video/video-jodie-swallow-talks-2015-setbacks-ahead-of-70-3-worlds_121323 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/video/video-jodie-swallow-talks-2015-setbacks-ahead-of-70-3-worlds_121323#comments Thu, 27 Aug 2015 22:58:50 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=121323

Swallow sat down with Triathlete to give an update on her season, which has been plagued with health issues.

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In advance of the 2015 Ironman 70.3 World Championship in Zell am See-Kaprun, Austria, Jodie Swallow (GBR) sat down with Triathlete to give an update on her season, which has been plagued with health issues, and says she believes she’s capable of a world-best performance in both Austria and Kona when fully healthy and prepared.

RELATED – 2015 Ironman 70.3 World Championships: Women’s Preview

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Jesse Thomas Course Recon: 70.3 Worlds Bike http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/race-coverage/jesse-thomas-course-recon-70-3-worlds-bike_121315 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/race-coverage/jesse-thomas-course-recon-70-3-worlds-bike_121315#comments Thu, 27 Aug 2015 20:52:15 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=121315

Thomas geotagged photos along the way in Zell am See. Get the interactive map on Thomas' Strava page.

American pro Jesse Thomas has been in Austria for about a week and shared his ride around the majority of the race's bike course.

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Thomas geotagged photos along the way in Zell am See. Get the interactive map on Thomas' Strava page.

This weekend’s Ironman 70.3 World Championship bike course promises some stunning views, difficult climbs and technical descents. American pro Jesse Thomas has been in Austria for about a week and shared his ride around the majority of the race’s bike course. In true Thomas fashion, he responded to some of his fans and friends about what to expect on the course.

On riding with a disc:
“I think disc is fine. I’m riding one. Most of the race you’ll be going very fast and the speed will be worth it.”

On staying calm:
“It will be fine if you don’t act like an a hole on the first 3-4 minutes! Just a couple of tight turns that are totally manageable if you’re not trying to whip by people. I’m just worried about people being too aggressive and paying for it.”

More on the steep descent:
“The descent is very technical for about 3 minutes. I’m honestly worried someone’s going to go off the road. It’s got two tight switchbacks, the second of which is descending radius, so really gets you if you don’t know it’s coming, I was riding easy and still swerved into the opposite lane.”

On gearing:
“I rode 39 25 and it was definitely pushing it and I tend to mash gears fairly well. I was probably 50-60 rpm the last 10 minutes going ez. I’d recommend a 28 for most people. Kinda wish I had packed one, think I’ll be right on the edge for that last 10 minutes.”

On the temps:
“Depends a lot on the day but has been 60-75 since I got here for air temp. Last I heard water temp is borderline wetsuit legal for pros, not sure what age group cutoff is!”

For more from Thomas in Zell am See, follow him on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Strava. Also check out is “Triathlife” column here on Triathlete.com.

 

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Andrew Messick To Remain CEO Of Ironman http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/news/andrew-messick-to-remain-ceo-of-ironman_121312 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/news/andrew-messick-to-remain-ceo-of-ironman_121312#comments Thu, 27 Aug 2015 19:46:43 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=121312

Messick at the 2013 Ironman World Championship. Photo: John David Becker

Messick and "the core of the senior management team" will remain with Ironman.

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Messick at the 2013 Ironman World Championship. Photo: John David Becker

World Triathlon Corporation, owners of Ironman, yesterday announced that private Chinese conglomerate Dalian Wanda Group, known as the Wanda Group, has purchased the organization from Providence Equity Partners, a private equity group based out of Providence, R.I. that has owned the company since 2008.

Prior to the public announcement, Ironman CEO Andrew Messick, who has overseen the company since 2011, explained via email that the leadership of the organization will largely remain unchanged and Ironman will continue to pursue its goal of aggressive growth.

“Although this is big news for our organization, rest assured that the Ironman team will stay focused on our races, our people, our athletes and our partners,” Messick wrote in the email. “Ironman has a very bright future: I intend to remain the CEO of Ironman and will be signing a contract extension as will the core of our senior management team. More broadly, our teams and leadership will remain intact, we will continue to grow and provide opportunities for partners and athletes.”

According to its website, the Wanda Group was founded in 1988 and operates in four major areas: commercial property, luxury hotels, culture and tourism, and department stores. In 2014, the company’s total assets totaled approximately $85.6 billion and its annual income reached $38.8 billion. In terms of American-based assets, the group most notably owns AMC Theatres, which it purchased in 2012 for $2.6 billion.

Though the majority of Ironman’s full-distance and 70.3 races take place in North America, Europe and Australia/New Zealand, the company has been vocal about targeting Asia and working to meet the growing demand for the sport in that region.

RELATED: The Next Triathlon Boom? Ironman’s Expansion Into Asia

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Recipe Of The Week: Pineapple-Coconut Wild Rice Pudding http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/nutrition/recipe-of-the-week-pineapple-coconut-wild-rice-pudding_121309 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/nutrition/recipe-of-the-week-pineapple-coconut-wild-rice-pudding_121309#comments Thu, 27 Aug 2015 17:46:29 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=121309

Creamy, comforting rice pudding gets a healthy twist in this recipe using wild rice, which is an excellent source of protein and fiber.

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Creamy, comforting rice pudding gets a healthy twist in this recipe using wild rice—an excellent source of protein and fiber. A juicy burst of fresh pineapple adds a rich dose of Vitamin C and enzymes that aid in digestion. This recipe makes a large batch to portion out and have on hand for breakfast, dessert or sweet-tooth snack cravings.

Ingredients

1 pound wild rice
2 (13.5 oz) cans light coconut milk
½ cup agave
2 Tbsp coconut oil
2 eggs
2 tsp pure vanilla extract
1 tsp sea salt
1 pineapple, diced
Toasted coconut chips, for garnish
Chopped macadamia nuts or almonds, for garnish

RELATED: Training And Racing With Whole Foods

Preparation

1. Bring rice and 3 cups water to a boil in a pot. Reduce heat to simmer, cover and let cook 20-30 minutes until water has absorbed. Rice will be al dente.
2. Transfer cooked rice to a large saucepan with 1 ½ cans of the coconut milk, agave, and sea salt. Bring to a shallow boil, reduce heat to simmer, cover and let cook until creamy stirring occasionally (about 20 minutes).
3. Whisk the remaining ½ can coconut milk with the eggs and vanilla. Add this to the saucepan and cook 5-10 minutes longer.
4. Let cool for 30 minutes and mix in the fresh diced pineapple.
5. Top with extra pineapple, coconut and nuts if desired.

More recipes from Jessica Cerra. 

Jessica Cerra is the owner of Fit Food by Jess, a private chef and catering company in Encinitas, Calif., and the co-founder of Harmony Bar. A former professional XTERRA triathlete, Cerra now races for Twenty16 Women’s Professional Cycling Team.

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Conrad Stoltz To Compete In Last XTERRA Race Sunday http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/news/conrad-stoltz-to-compete-in-last-xterra-race-sunday_121307 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/news/conrad-stoltz-to-compete-in-last-xterra-race-sunday_121307#comments Thu, 27 Aug 2015 16:42:42 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=121307

Stoltz at the XTERRA Asia-Pacific Championships earlier this year. Photo: XTERRA

South Africa's Conrad Stoltz has announced that this Sunday's XTERRA European Championships will be his last race on the circuit.

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Stoltz at the XTERRA Asia-Pacific Championships earlier this year. Photo: XTERRA

South Africa’s Conrad Stoltz, a four-time XTERRA world champion, has announced that this Sunday’s XTERRA European Championships in England will likely be his last time competing on the circuit.

“I’m pretty sure this it,” Stoltz told XTERRA.

“I don’t have regrets. I’m 41, I had a fantastic career, have lots of memories and have done a lot of neat stuff,” said Stoltz, adding that the best thing that ever happened was the birth of his baby girl Xena in the off-season. “She changed our lives in a huge way. Everything else pales in comparison now that we have this little bundle. My retirement means we can really spend a lot of time with her and we literally have her with us all the time. Being a dad is indescribable. It’s awesome.”

In addition to the four XTERRA world titles, Stoltz also has an unprecedented 53 career wins in off-road triathlon.

RELATED – The Modern Caveman: Conrad Stoltz

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Training Day With Tim Don http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/features/training-day-with-tim-don_121304 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/features/training-day-with-tim-don_121304#comments Thu, 27 Aug 2015 16:20:03 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=121304

Join four-time world champion Tim Don in Boulder to learn what it takes to be competitive at the highest level of long-distance triathlon.

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With four world titles under his belt—all at short-course racing—37-year-old Tim Don is just getting started. After three Olympic appearances (2000, 2004 and 2008), Don shifted his focus to long course after missing the 2012 team. Under the guidance of coach Julie Dibens, Don is preparing to go after the Ironman 70.3 world title Sunday in Zel am See, Austria. After that, he’ll get ready to compete at the Ironman World Championship for the first time on Oct. 10. In this video, join Don in Boulder, Colo. to learn what it takes to be competitive at the highest level of long-distance triathlon racing.

RELATED – PROfile: Tim Don

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Chinese Conglomerate Acquires Ironman For $650 Million http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/news/chinese-conglomerate-acquires-ironman-for-650-million_121299 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/news/chinese-conglomerate-acquires-ironman-for-650-million_121299#comments Thu, 27 Aug 2015 02:21:52 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=121299

Age groupers compete in the 2014 Ironman World Championship. Photo: Endurapix

Dalian Wanda Group Co., Ltd. (“Wanda Group”) has reached an agreement to acquire Ironman for an equity value of approximately $650

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Age groupers compete in the 2014 Ironman World Championship. Photo: Endurapix

Dalian Wanda Group Co., Ltd. (“Wanda Group”), one of the leading Chinese private conglomerates, has reached an agreement to acquire 100% of Ironman for an equity value of approximately $650 million from Providence Equity Partners.

Read the complete announcement from Ironman below and check back to Triathlete.com as we follow up on this developing story:

As part of the transaction, Wanda Group will work with the current lending group and assume Ironman’s existing indebtedness. The acquisition by Wanda Group heralds yet another landmark investment in the sports sector following Infront Sports & Media and Atletico Madrid.

“Wanda Group’s acquisition of Ironman marks another exciting chapter and opportunity for the future growth of Ironman after seven very successful years of ownership by Providence Equity Partners,” said Andrew Messick, Chief Executive Officer for Ironman. “Wanda Group is a global-minded organization that shares our desire for excellence and continued growth, particularly in Asia. We are delighted to be part of the Wanda Group family of companies and are excited about the future of Ironman as we continue to provide life changing race experiences for athletes of all levels from their first step to the finish line.”

The Ironman brand is the largest participation sports platform in the world. Its flagship races are Ironman triathlons, which consists of a 3.9km (2.4 mile) swim, 180km (112 mile) bike and 42km (26.2 mile) run, and Ironman 70.3 triathlons, which consist of a 1.9km (1.2 mile) swim, 90km (56 mile) bike, and 21.1km (13.1 mile) run. From its beginnings on the shores of Waikiki Beach on the island of O’ahu in Hawaii in 1978, Ironman has organized, promoted, and licensed triathlon events for 37 years, and owns five exclusive triathlon brands, operating at least 250 events every year around the world.

Ironman is expected to generate $183 million in revenue in 2015 and has increased revenue at a CAGR of 21% over the past four years. Due to its unique business model and proprietary intellectual property, the company is expected to deliver strong continued growth going forward.

The 2015 acquisitions of Ironman and Infront Sports & Media properties have made Wanda Group one of the world’s largest and most comprehensive sports companies. With these new businesses, Wanda Group now has sports sales, media & marketing, and operational capabilities on six continents with strong positions in North America, Europe, China, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand.

Davis Noell, Managing Director at Providence Equity Partners said, “We have thoroughly enjoyed our partnership with Ironman over the past seven years and are pleased with the company’s growth and operational excellence under Andrew’s leadership. We have great respect for Wanda Group and its leading global sports platform and believe Ironman is well positioned to continue its success with their support.”

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Ironman 70.3 Worlds From Zel am See: 4 Days Out http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/photos/ironman-70-3-worlds-from-zel-am-see-4-days-out_121245 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/photos/ironman-70-3-worlds-from-zel-am-see-4-days-out_121245#comments Wed, 26 Aug 2015 23:13:14 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=121245

Photos: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image Not in Zel Am See, Austria for Sunday’s Ironman 70.3 Championships? (There’s also a

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Photos: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image

Not in Zel Am See, Austria for Sunday’s Ironman 70.3 Championships? (There’s also a more traditional 70.3 on Saturday.) Get ready to be jealous with these images of the scenery and pre-race action from photographer Paul Phillips. Follow Paul on Twitter at @Compimagephoto for more from Austria.

RELATED – 2015 Ironman 70.3 World Championship Preview: The Men

RELATED – 2015 Ironman 70.3 World Championship Preview: The Women

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2015 Ironman 70.3 World Championship Preview: The Women http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/news/2015-ironman-70-3-world-championship-preview-the-women_121211 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/news/2015-ironman-70-3-world-championship-preview-the-women_121211#comments Wed, 26 Aug 2015 20:24:31 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=121211

Ryf won the Ironman European Championship in July. Photo: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image/@Compimagephoto

We look at the strengths, season highlights and more of defending 70.3 world champion Daniela Ryf and nine other top competitors.

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Ryf won the Ironman European Championship in July. Photo: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image/@Compimagephoto


The Ironman 70.3 World Championships head to Europe for the first time this weekend, with 26 professional women preparing to compete in Zell am See in Austria for the coveted title of Ironman 70.3 world champion. The reigning champion, Switzerland’s Daniela Ryf, is the heavy favorite to defend on Sunday. Who do we think could knock her off the top of the podium? Here we take a look at the strengths, season highlights and more of Ryf and nine other women on the start list. Preview the men’s race here.

Daniela Ryf (SUI)

Best 70.3 worlds result: Champion (2014)
Racing Kona: Yes
Notable: Her only second place in a race in the last two years was Kona 2014 (she won every other race).
Fun fact: Ryf trains in nearby St. Moritz, Switzerland, giving her the extra altitude and convenience factor.
Strengths: Sheer grit as a racer, with dominant bike prowess and confidence to execute on all three disciplines.
What it’ll take to win: Doing what she does best—crushing everyone on the bike and holding her own out of T2. Barring no nutrition mistakes or mechanical issues, she’s hard to vote against for the title.

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2015 Ironman 70.3 World Championship Preview: The Men http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/news/2015-ironman-70-3-world-championship-preview-the-men_121197 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/news/2015-ironman-70-3-world-championship-preview-the-men_121197#comments Wed, 26 Aug 2015 20:23:41 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=121197

Javier Gomez. Photo: John David Becker

We look at the strengths, season highlights and more of defending 70.3 world champion Javier Gomez and nine other top competitors.

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Javier Gomez. Photo: John David Becker


At last year’s Ironman 70.3 World Championship in Mont-Tremblant, Canada, Spain’s Javier Gomez—a four-time ITU world champion—took the world title after little experience competing at the distance. Given that he appears to be in top form, has more 70.3 racing under his belt and will get to defend his title on European soil, it’s hard to bet against Gomez at this Sunday’s race in Zel am See, Austria. That said, a win won’t come easy as he’ll face off against several of the top names in the sport. Here, we look at the strengths, season highlights and more of Gomez and nine other top competitors. Preview the women’s race here.

Javier Gomez (ESP)

Best 70.3 worlds result: Champion (2014)
Racing Kona: No
Notable: 2012 Olympic silver medalist and four-time ITU world champion
Fun fact: On average he spends 200–230 days per year traveling.
Strengths: Exceptionally strong runner, top swimmer; strategic racer
What it’ll take to win: The defending champion will be hard to beat—last year, he was in the lead pack out of the water, stayed with the leaders on the bike and posted a field-leading 1:09 half-marathon to narrowly take the victory over fellow Olympic medalist Jan Frodeno. The versatile athlete, with mostly Olympic-distance, draft-legal experience from the ITU scene, is a solid all-around triathlete, and he punched his ticket to the 2016 Olympic Games a few weeks ago, leaving him free to pursue racing other distances. His only (sort of) weakness would be if he somehow gets dropped on the bike and has a speedy runner, such as Frodeno, ahead of him, but his strategic ITU mind makes that unlikely. However, this may not be his biggest goal of the season as he’ll compete in Chicago on Sept. 18 for the chance at a fifth ITU world title—he’s currently ranked first in the WTS rankings and won last weekend’s WTS Stockholm race.

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Eat Healthy Without Going Hungry http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/nutrition/eat-healthy-without-going-hungry_104199 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/nutrition/eat-healthy-without-going-hungry_104199#comments Wed, 26 Aug 2015 16:20:25 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=104199

Photo: Shutterstock.com

There are ways to lose or maintain weight without starving yourself between meals.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com


There are ways to lose or maintain weight without starving yourself between meals.

Everyone knows the conventional prescription for weight management: Eat less and exercise more. But that prescription is changing.

No, doctors and health scientists have not begun to recommend that we now eat more and exercise less to manage our weight. Many diet experts are, however, slightly modifying the advice they’ve been giving for decades.

The cause of the revision is a rapidly broadening scientific acceptance of the simple fact that most of us find it exceedingly difficult, if not impossible, to eat less without feeling unsatisfied. So the new prescription for weight management is something more like this: Reduce the number of calories you eat in a way that still allows you to feel satisfied by your meals—and exercise more.

Doctors and health scientists use the term “satiety” to refer to that feeling of satisfaction, or lack of hunger, which every person needs in order to sustain healthy eating habits. The concept of satiety has received a lot of attention lately thanks to research demonstrating that very few people have the “willpower” to sustain a diet that leaves them feeling hungry most of the time.

Barbara Rolls, Ph.D., the author of Volumetrics, has even called satiety “the missing ingredient in weight management.” In other words, if you want to achieve or maintain a healthy body weight, you must combine eating less, exercise and satiety.

“If you’re not craving food and feeling deprived, it’s a heck of a lot easier to stay with your eating plan,” said Jonny Bowden, PhD, CNS and author of The 150 Healthiest Foods on Earth.

Is it really possible to reduce the number of calories you consume each day without giving up satiety? Yes! In fact, new research suggests that by practicing a couple of simple eating strategies, anyone can eat less without feeling less satisfied by meals.

RELATED: Can You Lose Weight Through Exercise?

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Eurobike: SRAM Reveals Red eTap Wireless Groupset http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/gear-tech/eurobike-sram-reveals-red-etap-wireless-groupset_121190 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/gear-tech/eurobike-sram-reveals-red-etap-wireless-groupset_121190#comments Wed, 26 Aug 2015 16:08:18 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=121190

SRAM's new e-Tap electronic groupset is wireless, so each part has its own battery. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com

SRAM’s new Red eTap wireless drivetrain hits Shimano Di2 and Campagnolo EPS where they’re weakest, and matches their strengths.

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SRAM's new e-Tap electronic groupset is wireless, so each part has its own battery. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com

SRAM’s new Red eTap wireless drivetrain hits Shimano Di2 and Campagnolo EPS where they’re weakest, and matches their strengths. It’s more modern, more savvy, and more user-friendly. SRAM will offer the eTAP setup for triathlon and TT bikes right away. With more triathlon bikes at every price point featuring integrated setups, the wireless system has the potential to be a game changer for triathletes.

RELATED PHOTOS: SRAM Red eTap Wireless

Key points

– It’s electronic.
– Wireless with a custom protocol (no Ant+ or Bluetooth) called Airea.
– New shift logic — only two buttons, left shifts to easier gear, right to harder gear, press both for front shift.
– Quick setup, complete build in less than 15 minutes.
– Extra shift buttons, called Blips, available (including TT setup).
– 45 minutes to charge batteries, 1000-kilometer run time.
– Weight within spitting distance of Red mechanical.
– Only cable-actuated brake levers are currently available.

General function

ETap is an electronic system, just like Shimano’s Di2 or Campagnolo EPS. But it takes electronics a step further, removing the wiring harnesses that both those groups rely on, and switching to an entirely wireless communication between the shifters and derailleurs. Each component in SRAM’s new system is self-contained, with its own battery and wireless transmitter. They just need to be bolted to the frame, synced together, adjusted, and you’re off.

Shift logic is changed completely. Shimano and Campagnolo both chose to keep their shifter function virtually identical to that of their mechanical groups — SRAM emphatically did not. I think SRAM’s new shift logic is more logical.

There is only one shift paddle per shifter. The left shifter paddle shifts the rear derailleur inboard, to an easier gear, while the right shifter shifts the derailleur outboard, to a harder gear. If both buttons are pressed at the same time, the front derailleur shifts.

Left, easier. Right, harder. Both, front shift. It’s that simple.

Derailleurs

The rear derailleur acts as the ‘brain’ of the system. In wireless terms, it’s the master and the front derailleur and shifters are slaves. It’s about 20 percent bigger than a standard Red rear derailleur, and weighs 239 grams, almost 100 grams heavier than a standard Red rear derailleur. That’s also 26 grams heavier than a Dura-Ace Di2 rear derailleur, which doesn’t have its own battery.

The Red eTap derailleur features a carbon cage and ceramic pulleys, just like the mechanical version, and installs just like a normal rear derailleur.

A small, rechargeable lithium ion battery is attached to the back and weighs 24 grams (this weight is included in the 239-gram figure). This battery will last about 1,000 kilometers, according to SRAM. It is identical to the battery used on the front derailleur, and will drain quicker as it is used more frequently. That means that should it run out, a rider can swap the front derailleur battery to the rear and continue onward with a functional rear derailleur.

Both front and rear derailleurs have small LED lights that indicate battery life with every shift. A flash of green is good. A flash of red indicates that the battery is down to 25 percent, about 250 kilometers. Repeated red flashes indicate imminent singlespeeding.

The front derailleur uses the same Yaw tech as SRAM’s mechanical derailleurs, so it doesn’t self-trim like a Di2 derailleur. It does overshift and then settle back into position, to make shifts faster.

An aluminum outer cage is matched with a steel inner cage for durability and a composite tail to drop some weight.

The front derailleur weighs 180 grams; about 75 grams more than a Di2 front derailleur (which, again, relies on a separate battery) and will cost you $370. The rear derailleur costs $590.

Shifters

The single, large paddle on the shifters is nearly identical to current SRAM mechanical shifters, though it doesn’t move as far before a shift is initiated. SRAM says it went through over 40 different versions of button placement, keen to find the most intuitive, but its original design turned out to be the best. Given that all three major brands have a shift paddle in this exact spot, this fact isn’t surprising.

Small CR2032 batteries, the same as those found in many power meters, heart rate straps, and other small devices, power the shifters. These are not rechargeable, but will last at least two years, according to SRAM. The shifters are simply sending a signal, and function in a similar manner to the key beeper you use with your car (which lasts a very long time). The battery lives behind a small cover on the top of the hood.

The hoods themselves have gone on a diet. They’re slimmer than their mechanical siblings. The rubber material is the same, and shape is generally the same, with a similar knob and nearly identical reach to the brake levers.

Those brake levers, which are carbon fiber, are much stiffer than before, and it’s noticeable when braking.

At 260 grams per set, the shifters are 30 grams heavier than Dura-Ace Di2. They’ll set you back $580.

Blips

Shimano has its “sprint shifters,” SRAM has Blips. They’re small button pods that attach, via wires, to ports in the shifters. The wires come in four different lengths, and two of them can be plugged into each shifter. That means you could run a total of six shifters on your handlebars, if you want to look ridiculous.

The Blips weigh only 6 grams, and cost $200 for a set of four.

For those using aero bars without a standard road shifter, the Blips can plug into a Blipbox instead. The Blipbox has all the same wireless tech as the road shifters, allowing the Blips to talk to both derailleurs. The Blipbox weighs 31 grams and costs $300.

Setup

Setup is easy. Very easy. With no cables to fiddle with, or internal routing to curse, setting up a brand-new bike takes less than 15 minutes. One of SRAM’s mechanics set up a time-trial bike’s shifting, a process than would normally take at least three nights and nine beers, in less than six minutes.

If you’re not running Blips, road setup is even easier. Simply mount up each part, and start the simple syncing process by holding the “function” button on the rear derailleur, which is right next to the indicator LED. Hold that down until it glows green, then move onto the front derailleur and do the same. Repeat with the shifters. Green lights means everything is paired up and ready.

Limit adjustments on both derailleurs are nearly identical to a mechanical setup. You simply need to back the rear derailleur limits out a bit so the motor isn’t working against the physical limit, as that could damage the motor.

Once limits are set, micro adjustments can be made using the function button on the back of the shift paddles. Pressing the function button on the right shifter, then pressing the right shifter paddle (this is easy, just pinch the paddle and push in), the rear derailleur will microadjust to the right in 2/10mm increments. Do the same with the left shifter and it will microadjust to the left. Hold both function buttons and the front derailleur can be adjusted in the same way.

There is no ‘adjust mode,’ as with Shimano. Whenever a function button is held down, that’s adjust mode. Let it go and the system will shift normally.

Read more: Velonews.com

RELATED – 2015 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide: Components

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Ready To Become A Better Swimmer? Be Positive! http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/training/avoid-negative-thinking-swim_106529 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/training/avoid-negative-thinking-swim_106529#comments Wed, 26 Aug 2015 13:15:51 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=106529

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Your mental outlook toward swimming can have a tremendous effect on your results in the water.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

Things getting rough in the water? Combat negative thinking with these techniques.

Your mental outlook toward swimming can have a tremendous effect on your results in the water. When things get challenging, do you stay positive and motivated or tend to go through bouts of negative self-talk? Negative thinking creates stress and destroys your self-confidence, which can hinder performance.

The process to change your feelings about swimming is more than just “think positive.” Self-talk for success must be positive, but it also needs to be believable and achievable. The first step is to be aware of your thoughts and actions before, during and after a swim practice. Listen to your internal monologue and make notes of how you are talking to yourself. Observe how you are presenting yourself to the world. Would you say the same things or act the same way toward your best friend while watching him or her swim?

RELATED: Pro Tips For Mental Toughness

The next step is to look at each negative thought with rational thinking. Challenge each one with a rational answer or explanation:

“I am a terrible swimmer.” Are you consistently putting in the pool hours to become a better swimmer? Are you receiving coaching and tips from knowledgeable resources? If you are swimming laps in a pool, you are a better swimmer than a large percentage of American adults who cannot cross the pool.

“I am going to be last out of the water in the race.” Your performance should not be judged by things outside of your control such as other participants. Commit to be the best you can be and don’t fixate on how you measure up to others.

“I am embarrassed by what the other swimmers think of me.” Surprise! No one in the pool is thinking about you, except for you! Everyone has his or her own internal monologue and it is often self-critical, so try to let it go.

Finally, replace the negative thoughts with positive ones and specific affirmations. What you say to yourself must be possible and believable in order for the self-talk to be effective:

I am training to become a better swimmer. I am practicing to achieve my goals.

I am prepared to complete the race. I am ready for everything that might reasonably happen in the open water.

I am doing the best I can. Other swimmers respect me for accepting the challenge of learning to swim.

RELATED – Triathlife With Jesse Thomas: Mantra Power

Simple tips to stay positive

  • Smile each time you think about swimming, while you drive to the pool, and as you walk to your lane. Your external outlook can help shape your internal attitude.
  • Set short- and long-term goals that are measureable and attainable. Write them down and cross them off when achieved. You can easily forget how much you have improved since day one.
  • Ask questions. Seek help. Try new things. Sometimes the smallest change can result in the biggest improvement.
  • Allow yourself to forgive and forget. Don’t punish yourself after a bad set or experience at the pool. Analyze it with rational thoughts (e.g., Did I have to wake up extra early for work?) and then don’t allow yourself to dwell on the negative.

More from Sara McLarty.

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Inside My Gear Bag With Paul Matthews http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/gear-tech/inside-my-gear-bag-with-paul-matthews_121180 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/gear-tech/inside-my-gear-bag-with-paul-matthews_121180#comments Tue, 25 Aug 2015 22:56:59 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=121180

Photo: John David Becker

Pro triathlete Paul “Barny” Matthews gives us a peek at his gear essentials.

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Photo: John David Becker

Pro triathlete Paul “Barny” Matthews has been racing triathlon since age 11 in his native Australia, where he quickly rose through the Australian Triathlon Junior ranks. Now based in Boulder, Colo., he stepped up to long-course triathlon a few years ago, when he finished the 2012 Ironman Asia-Pacific Championship in Melbourne in 8:05:58, the second fastest Ironman debut. Barny’s time between workouts is spent very differently these days: He and his wife, Hillary, welcomed their daughter, Emerson, into the world in December, two months after Barny finished 14th at the Ironman World Championship. He gave us a peek at his gear essentials.

RELATED – Transition Like A Pro: Paul Matthews

1 Smith Optics Lowdown sunglasses for casual wear ($209, Smithoptics.com) “I never leave home without a pair of sunnies.”

2 Aqua Sphere ErgoFlex Hand Paddles ($20, Aquasphereswim.com) “I use these every swim session.”

3 Lezyne CNC Travel Drive floor pump ($100, Lezyne.com) “I take it everywhere with me. Light, portable and pumps my tires up really easily.”

4 Adidas AdiZero Adios Boost 2.0 ($145, Adidas.com) “I love my new running shoes.”

5 Vegemite (Vegemite.com.au) “Nothing better than a couple slices of toast with Vegemite on it!”

6 JLab Epic Bluetooth Earbuds ($100, Jlabaudio.com)

7 Coca-Cola (Coca-cola.com) “Always need a nice, cold Coca-Cola during a long ride and after a hard day’s work!”

8 Smith Optics Pivlock Arena  for training and racing ($159, Smithoptics.com )

9 Frosted strawberry Pop-Tarts (Poptarts.com) “I always have these before I race. I tried it once and I raced well after having them, so I’ve done it ever since.”

10 Alex Ferguson: My Autobiography ($15, Amazon.com) “The book I’m reading right now [about the former Manchester United Football Club manager], even though I’m a Liverpool supporter!”

11 FuelBelt Helium H2O ($50, Fuelbelt.com) “For Ironman, you always need to stay hydrated.”

12 Aqua Sphere P2K pull bUOy ($20, Aquasphereswim.com)

13 Marathon By Timex Strap Digital Sports Watch ($23, Target.com) “I’m not very fashionable! I bought a $20 Timex watch from Target that I use for most of my training. All it does is tell me the time and has a stopwatch.”

More “Inside My Gear Bag.”

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TriathlEats: Skirt Steak With Roasted Potatoes And Salad http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/nutrition/triathleats-skirt-steak-with-roasted-potatoes-and-salad_121176 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/nutrition/triathleats-skirt-steak-with-roasted-potatoes-and-salad_121176#comments Tue, 25 Aug 2015 19:54:49 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=121176

Photo: Matthew Cetta

Eat clean after a tough workout with this protein- and nutrient-rich meal.

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Photo: Matthew Cetta


Eat clean after a tough workout with this protein- and nutrient-rich meal.

Ingredients

For steak marinade
1 8-ounce skirt steak
¼ cup olive oil
1 tsp garlic, chopped
¼ tsp cumin
1 tsp cilantro, chopped

For salad
1 cup baby arugula
½ cup blanched haricots verts (or green beans)
½ cup cherry tomatoes, halved
1 T thinly sliced green scallion
¼ cup, each, sliced cucumber, sliced red onion, sliced zucchini
1 tsp, each, torn fresh parsley and torn cilantro
Lemon juice, to taste (about half a lemon)
Salt, to taste
Olive oil, to taste

For potatoes
1 cup mixed marble potatoes (or any baby potato)
1 sprig rosemary
Salt, to taste
Olive oil

Directions

Combine all marinade ingredients and marinate steak for two days (or at least three hours). One hour before serving, combine all salad ingredients. Thirty minutes before serving, boil potatoes with salt and whole rosemary sprig until tender. Drain and remove rosemary, lightly crush, then crisp in olive oil for 5 minutes. Grill steak to medium-rare. Assemble all on a plate. Serves 1.

Chef Tip: 
To ensure proper meat prep, Chef Karp recommends making sure the fire on the grill is not too hot (grill the steak over moderate heat). Let the meat rest five minutes before serving.

RELATED – TriathlEats: Marinated Flank Steak

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Med Tent: Shouldering Through http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/training/med-tent-shouldering-through_121170 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2015/08/training/med-tent-shouldering-through_121170#comments Tue, 25 Aug 2015 19:41:57 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=121170

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Don’t let shoulder bursitis, a swimming overuse injury, keep you out of the pool.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com


Don’t let shoulder bursitis, a swimming overuse injury that often accompanies an impingement or rotator cuff strain, keep you out of the pool.  

Shoulder bursitis (technically subacromial bursitis) is marked by a raw, burning pain at the front or side of the shoulder. Loss of motion in the shoulder can also be a symptom of bursitis. The pain increases with overhead activities such as throwing or swimming, and the pain may also increase if you lean on your elbow.

Bursae are fluid-filled shock absorbers located between a bone and a muscle, tendon or skin. In the shoulder’s case, the subacromial bursa interacts with the rotator cuff and the surrounding bones, especially the acromion, which is part of the scapula (shoulder blade).

The bursa in this area can become irritated and cause pain. It’s common for subacromial bursitis to accompany shoulder impingement or rotator cuff strain, but it can have a variety of causes. The most typical ones for athletes are rotator cuff weakness, shoulder instability, a shoulder impact and overuse, especially in overhead sports like baseball, tennis, swimming and volleyball.

Fix It

See a doctor. The shoulder is a complex and important joint, so see a sports doc at the first sign of shoulder pain.

Employ dynamic rest. Lay off the upper-body work (including swimming), and use lower-body workouts to maintain fitness.

Ice it. Ice applied to the shoulder for 15 minutes several times a day can help reduce inflammation.

Try an NSAID. An anti-inflammatory like ibuprofen or naproxen can help with the pain.

Start rehabbing. As the pain improves, do some rotator cuff exercises to help strengthen your shoulder. Here are two.

Shoulder Squeeze #1

Lie facedown on an exercise bench. Hold your arms out to your sides parallel to the floor, bent at 90 degrees with your thumbs pointing toward the ceiling. Now try to raise your elbows toward the ceiling and feel your shoulder blades squeezing together. Hold for a moment and return to the starting position. Do 10 to 20 reps depending on your strength.

Shoulder Squeeze #2

While lying facedown on the bench, hold your arms along your sides with your palms up. Keeping your arms straight, lift your palms toward the ceiling, again feeling your shoulder blades squeeze together. Hold for a moment and return to the starting position. Again, do 10 to 20 reps.

RELATED: Shoulder Exercises For A Stronger Swim

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