Triathlete.com http://triathlon.competitor.com Triathlon Training, Gear, Nutrition, Photos, Race Results & Calendars Fri, 21 Nov 2014 22:52:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 Popular This Week: IMAZ, Coping With A Packed Pool & More http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/photos/popular-week-imaz-coping-packed-pool_109755 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/photos/popular-week-imaz-coping-packed-pool_109755#comments Fri, 21 Nov 2014 20:57:38 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=109755

The five most popular articles from the week of Nov. 16.

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6 Laundry Detergents Made For Athletic Apparel http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/gear-tech/laundry-detergents-made-athletic-apparel_109739 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/gear-tech/laundry-detergents-made-athletic-apparel_109739#comments Fri, 21 Nov 2014 20:23:07 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=109739

Photo: John David Becker

Extend the life of your (expensive!) training clothes with these detergents formulated specifically for athletic apparel.

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Photo: John David Becker

Extend the life of your (expensive!) training clothes with these detergents formulated specifically for athletic apparel.

Apart from using a sport-specific detergent, there are several other important steps to remember when washing your technical fabrics. These fabrics need to be treated with extra care in order to help maintain their integrity and functionality.

Wash your clothing with cold water and air dry any synthetic fabrics, advises Julie Gabay, owner of Pacific Swim Bike Run in Connecticut. Putting spandex in the dryer will accelerate the breakdown of the thread and lead to shrinking of the garment.

When it comes to pesky grease stains and washing schedules, Stephanie Swanson, owner of SOAS endurance clothing, recommends using dish soap as a degreaser prior to washing your clothing. This will break up the grease and allow it to get rinsed out during the wash cycle.

Wash your spandex and technical fabrics quickly after use. If you cannot put them in the washer right away, make sure to rinse them out or even wear them into the shower to get the beginning of the washing and fabric restoration process going.

RELATED: Quick And Easy DIY Cleaners For Triathletes

Nathan Sports Wash

$10 for 20-ounce bottle, Nathansports.com

On top of removing odor and stains, this natural and vegetable-based wash is engineered to prevent color-fading and fabric damage over time.

Nikwax Base Sports Wash

$26 for 1-liter bottle, Nikwax-use.com

Specifically useful for your sweat-wicking base layers, Nikwax interacts with synthetic fabrics in a way that is designed to accelerate the fabric’s drying process and improve the cooling efficiency of the fabric itself.

Sports Suds

$21 for 14.1-ounce jar, Sportssuds.com

Eliminates extreme dirt and odor from exercise fabrics.

Eurostyle Sports Kit Wash

$16 for 16-ounce bottle, Chamoisbutter.com

When a washing machine isn’t available, the Sports Kit Wash is perfect for handwashing gear. It also removes chlorine from bathing suits and is safe for wetsuits.

Vapor Fresh

$22 for 80-ounce container, Rawathletics.com

Clear of dyes and fragrances, this powder detergent is made for athletic wear but also works for everyday use.

Vapor Fresh Sports Cleaning Spray

$12 for 16-ounce bottle, Rawathletics.com

Spray the more difficult-to-wash gear (think inside of helmets, shoes, etc.), with this smell-good cleaner.

RELATED – Triathlete Love: Dirty Laundry

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TriathlEats: Quesadilla Del Sol http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/nutrition/triathleats-quesadilla-del-sol_109731 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/nutrition/triathleats-quesadilla-del-sol_109731#comments Fri, 21 Nov 2014 20:13:13 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=109731

The Quesadilla Del Sol. Photo: Christopher Villano

A healthy, spiced-up twist on a cheesy favorite.

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The Quesadilla Del Sol. Photo: Christopher Villano


A healthy, spiced-up twist on a cheesy favorite.

Ingredients

For quesadilla:
½ red and ½ green bell peppers, sliced
¼ cup red onion, sliced
¼ cup pineapple, sliced
¼ cup plantains, sliced and sautéed to crisp
¼ cup tomatoes sliced
¼ cup black bean hummus
½ cup shredded mozzarella cheese
3 8-inch flour tortillas

For guacamole:
3 avocados, smashed with fork
Juice of 1 lime
Salt, to taste
1/3 cup pico de gallo

For Mexican rice:
2 cups long-grain white rice
¼ cup each frozen corn and peas
Salt, to taste
2 tomatoes
½ cup crushed canned tomatoes
½ onion
2 garlic cloves

For hummus:
1 cup canned black beans
Juice of ½ lemon
Salt, to taste
2 garlic cloves
2 T tahini paste

Directions

Make the guacamole by combining all ingredients together in a medium-size shallow bowl. For the black bean hummus, combine all ingredients in a blender until you reach the desired consistency (use the juice from pico de gallo or water as needed). To make the Mexican rice, in a blender, combine the tomatoes, crushed tomatoes, onion, garlic and enough water to give you 3 cups of liquid. Heat skillet on medium, and once hot, add enough canola oil to cover the pan. Add rice and stir to coat with the oil. Continue to stir rice every two minutes, until rice is golden brown. Slowly add tomato mixture from blender, corn, peas and salt, and stir. Bring to simmer, turn heat to low and cover. Cook for 15–20 minutes, turn heat off, and let sit for 10 minutes. To prepare the quesadilla, heat a nonstick pan on medium-high heat. One at a time, cover each tortilla entirely with cheese. Once cheese is melted, spread hummus on top of cheese, and set the tortillas aside. In a separate pan, combine all other ingredients and sauté with canola oil until tender. Add sautéed mixture on top of one tortilla, add second tortilla on top of tortilla with the mixture, add more sautéed veggies on top of the second one. Finally place last tortilla on the very top with hummus/cheese side down, then cut into quarters. Serve with rice, guacamole and pico de gallo.

RELATED: Chef Adam Gangewere’s Pico De Gallo Recipe

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Hill Repeats You’re Not Sick Of http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/training/hill-repeats-you%e2%80%99re-not-sick-of_27464 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/training/hill-repeats-you%e2%80%99re-not-sick-of_27464#comments Fri, 21 Nov 2014 18:10:09 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=27464

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Not all repeats need to be “Run up this hill. Jog down.” Here are a few new ideas from coaches to mix up your next set of repeats.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com


Hill workouts are the most sport-specific strength training you can do for running. But not all repeats need to be “Run up this hill. Jog down.” Here are a few new ideas from USAT-certified coaches to mix up your next set of repeats.

Iron-Distance Power Repeats

Benefits: Builds run-specific strength for longer events.

• Warm up for 2 miles on flat roads or in the grass. Do a few strides and dynamic stretches.

• Find a steep hill that’s about a half-mile long. Run up hard four times and recover with a walk or jog down. Don’t rest at the bottom; just blast right back to the top.

• Rest three to five minutes.

• Run 2 miles on a flat road with the same power output as you did on the hill.

• Rest three to five minutes.

• Cool down with an easy 10-minute jog.

Total distance: about 9 miles, depending on pace

Do this workout once a week, every other week and try to do 6x hill repeats the following session.

–Bob Mitera of Kokua Multisports, LLC in Barrington, Ill.

RELATED: Kettlebells + Hill = Killer Workout

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Men Of Triathlon Calendar Available For Pre-Order http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/news/men-triathlon-calendar-available-pre-order_109733 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/news/men-triathlon-calendar-available-pre-order_109733#comments Fri, 21 Nov 2014 17:18:55 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=109733

The Men of Triathlon are back and the 2015 calendars are available for pre-order now.

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The Men of Triathlon are back and the 2015 calendars are available for pre-order now. To order the calendar and see the team’s full roster of professional athletes, visit Menoftriathlon.com or donate directly to their Movember team at Moteam.co/men-of-triathlon.

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Quick Set Friday: 4×50 Drills http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/training/quick-set-friday-4x50-drills_66530 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/training/quick-set-friday-4x50-drills_66530#comments Fri, 21 Nov 2014 15:04:17 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=66530

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Triathlete contributor and swimming all-star Sara McLarty shares a swim workout to take to the pool this weekend.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

Triathlete contributor and swimming all-star Sara McLarty has a blog with more than 500 creative workouts used in her Masters swim program in Clermont, Fla. We’ll feature a workout every Friday so you have new ideas to take to the pool. On her blog (NTCMastersSwim.blogspot.com), you can pick a Monday set for a long distance focus, a Wednesday set for sprint training, or Friday for creative open water skills.

The A sets are between 4–5000 yards total, with intervals ranging from 1:20–1:30 per 100. The B sets are 3000–3500 total, with intervals of 1:50–2:00 per 100. The C sets are 2000–2500 total and all based on a rest interval.

A:
500 warm up
4×50 at :55 (25 right arm, 25 left arm)
4×50 at :50 (25 catch up, 25 fingertip drag)
4×50 at :60 (25 Tarzan, 25 3-6-3 drill)
4×50 at :60 (25 fist drill, 25 underwater recovery)
8×25 at :30 (IM order, all drill)
6×225 at 3:30 (75 free, 75 IM, 75 free)
50 easy
200 Sprint! (broken into: 12.5 12.5, 25, repeat 4x, w/ 20 sec rest)
100 easy
400 Drafting (swim w/ 2-3 other people, rotate leader after each 100)
100 easy
6×100 pull at 1:30 (3/5, 3/7, 3/9 breathing pattern by 50)
200 cool down
*4500 Total*

RELATED – Ask Coach Sara: The Optimal Strokes Per Breath

B:
500 warm up
4×50 at 1:05 (25 right arm, 25 left arm)
4×50 at 1:05 (25 catch up, 25 fingertip drag)
4×50 at 1:10 (25 Tarzan, 25 3-6-3 drill)
4×50 at 1:10 (25 fist drill, 25 underwater recovery)
6×150 at 3:15 (50 free, 50 non-free, 50 free)
50 easy
150 Sprint! (broken into: 12.5 12.5, 25, repeat 4x, w/ 20 sec rest)
100 easy
6×75 pull at 1:30 (3/5/7 breathing pattern by 25)
200 cool down
*3200 Total*

RELATED – Ask Coach Sara: Stopping Your Legs From Sinking

C:
400 warm up
4×50 w/ 15 sec rest (25 right arm, 25 left arm)
4×50 w/ 15 sec rest (25 catch up, 25 fingertip drag)
4×50 w/ 15 sec rest (25 Tarzan, 25 3-6-3 drill)
4×50 w/ 15 sec rest (25 fist drill, 25 underwater recovery)
6×100 w/ 40 sec rest (75 free, 25 non-free)
100 easy
6×75 pull w/ 30 sec rest (3/5/7 breathing pattern by 25)
100 cool down
*2400 Total*

Tarzan Drill:

Swim freestyle with your head out of the water. Look forward as if you were sighting a buoy or landmark in open water. Keep your head out of the water for the entire 25 to strengthen your neck muscles for triathlon swimming!

Fist Drill:

Swim regular freestyle. Ball your hands into fists and work on high elbow catch and pull under the water.

Finger-Tip Drag:

Swim regular freestyle. When your arm is out of the water (recovery phase) keep your elbow pointed toward the sky and your fingertips pointing down toward the water. Allow your fingertips (about 1/2 inch) to drag through the water from your hips all the way past your head.

Underwater Recovery Drill:

Swim freestyle but do not let your arms exit the water at the end of the underwater pull. As your hand reaches your thigh, bend your elbow and slide your hand forward along the side of your body. This is very similar to doggy-paddle but with an entire underwater stroke. Keep your head in the water and breathe to the side like normal.

3-6-3:

Take three strokes and pause on your right side with right arm extended forward and your left arm lying on left side. Remain in this position for six kicks. Take three more strokes and pause on your left side for six kicks. Repeat.

More “Quick Set Friday” workouts.

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The Impact A Rival Can Have On Your Racing http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/training/impact-rival-can-racing_109721 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/training/impact-rival-can-racing_109721#comments Fri, 21 Nov 2014 13:34:48 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=109721

Illustration by Matt Collins.

The latest research suggests that the competitive spirit may be an untapped source of inspiration for many of us.

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Illustration by Matt Collins.

Having a racing rival can lift your performance and lower your PR.

We’re all motivated to pursue our athletic endeavors for different reasons—to lose weight, work toward a personal best or to simply provide an outlet for a competitive spirit. The latest research suggests that the last reason may be an untapped source of inspiration for many of us, an extra incentive to reach our athletic goals.

In looking at the role of running rivalries, a study published in Social Psychological and Personality Science revealed that more than half of the runners surveyed identified a local rival whom they saw as important motivation for their training and racing. They also found that when they looked at race results, “the presence of at least one rival predicted significantly faster race times.” Indeed, in a 5K race, the participants ran roughly 25 seconds faster if their rival was competing in the same race.

It’s no secret that this deep-seated desire to “beat” someone is a common theme in sports across all levels from recreational to elite. Just like in horse racing when the horse enters the final stretch, humans also have an innate drive to outrun their competition.

“I believe that a biological playful, competitive, almost Darwinesque desire to win is at the basis of rivalries,” says Dr. Marshall Mintz, a clinical and sports psychologist in Springfield, N.J. “Power, control and aggression are powerful forces in the psychology of human performance, which can become very visible during rivalry situations.”

RELATED: Choosing Your Riding Partners

Even with this new research, it is important to keep in mind that sports psychologists first and foremost steer athletes toward a “mastery” focus when it comes to athletic competition. This means that they favor an athlete putting his energies into enhancing his own abilities through training and practice, rather than placing emphasis on elements outside themselves, like rivalries. With that said, Mintz adds, “If you are not trying to make technical improvement, rivalry can provide a motivational enhancement.”

However, the circumstances where a rival may be detrimental to performance occur when you allow your competition to distract you from the task at hand. When you get too wrapped up in racing your training partner or crosstown opponent, you can end up losing concentration and making strategic mistakes in the execution of a race or workout.

“If you are not working on anything other than maintaining optimal intensity of effort, however, then practicing with a rival or competitive partner can possibly be helpful,” Mintz explains. “Having a ‘rival’ who is slightly more productive and able to maintain a slightly higher rate of performance may enable you to follow them and increase your pace and intensity.”

While having a rival of equal or slightly higher ability level can help motivate you in certain types of workouts, you stand to experience the greatest boost in racing environments. “A rival’s presence can possibly increase an athlete’s sense of purpose and meaning regarding an event,” Mintz says.

 RELATED: Are You Too Competitive?

“Power, control and aggression are powerful forces in the psychology of human performance, which can become very visible during rivalry situations.”

—Clinical and sports psychologist Dr. Marshall Mintz

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Cycling Drills For Triathletes http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/training/drills-now-drill-it-later_45210 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/training/drills-now-drill-it-later_45210#comments Thu, 20 Nov 2014 20:00:15 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=45210

The off-season is a good time to incorporate skill sessions that will produce speed gains and improve your chances of avoiding injury.

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Basketball players know that you can’t scrimmage every practice, so to get better, they work on the basic elements of the game such as dribbling, free throws and footwork. Likewise, triathletes should work to improve their cycling technique. While most do so frequently with swimming and running drills, the more subtle pedaling skills tend to get overlooked.

The off-season is a good time to incorporate skill sessions that will produce speed gains and improve your chances of avoiding injury when you shift back to the big ring.

RELATED: 2 Cycling Workouts To Improve Cadence

Spin circles, not squares.

It seems simple enough, but most triathletes can improve dramatically in this area. Here’s how:

Ride off-road, preferably uphill. Mountain bikers have the truest spin of all cyclists, and that has a lot to do with the inconsistent and loose terrain on which they ride. In the off-road environment you are forced to produce your power as smoothly as possible with proper fore-aft balance or you risk losing traction. These skills will transfer nicely once you’re back on pavement. Use a mountain or cyclo-cross bike if you have one, but don’t hesitate to take your road or tri bike onto a well-maintained dirt road.

Do one-leg drills. Try these on the indoor trainer first, and then progress to outdoors on a safe, flat stretch of road. Snap out one shoe from the pedal and aim to do 30–60 seconds in a very easy gear. You’ll quickly learn how unskilled you are at pedaling a full circle, especially on the upstroke. Do five sets with each leg to develop neuromuscular patterning, hip flexor and hamstring strength and coordination. Note that your goal isn’t to produce any power during this phase (you can’t), but rather to focus solely on driving the bike forward without also lifting the off leg at the same time.

RELATED: At-Home Time-Efficient Strength For Cycling

Focus on form.

Include periodic 30-second “form checks” during each ride with critical attention to these areas:

• Drop the heel as you come over the top (12 o’clock) and begin the phase that produces the most power. This will engage the hamstring muscles as well as the quads and glutes.

• Point the toe at the bottom (6 o’clock) to recruit the calf muscles. The comparison to “scraping mud off the soles of your shoes” still applies.

• Make each knee rise and drop like a set of pistons in an engine—straight up and down without any noticeable wobbling.

Fliegelman is the owner and head coach of FastForward Sports (Fastforwardsports.net) in Boulder, Colo.

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Racing Weight: The Benefits Of Eating A Big Breakfast http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/nutrition/racing-weight-the-benefits-of-eating-a-big-breakfast-2_44881 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/nutrition/racing-weight-the-benefits-of-eating-a-big-breakfast-2_44881#comments Thu, 20 Nov 2014 18:22:12 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=44881

Studies have shown that athletes who eat a substantial breakfast tend to be leaner than those who typically skip it.

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In this video Racing Weight author Matt Fitzgerald discusses the importance of breakfast in an endurance athlete’s diet. Studies have shown that athletes who eat a substantial breakfast tend to be leaner than those who typically skip it.

RELATED: Breakfast Of Champions

 

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Recipe Of The Week: Spicy Bison Chili http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/nutrition/recipe-of-the-week-spicy-bison-chili_65697 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/nutrition/recipe-of-the-week-spicy-bison-chili_65697#comments Thu, 20 Nov 2014 16:05:58 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=65697

Compared to its counterparts (beef, chicken, turkey, salmon), bison is lowest in fat and highest in iron and essential fatty acids.

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Loaded with chiles, this recipe brings on the heat and lives up to its name. Bison is gaining popularity as a protein source and for good reason. Compared to its counterparts (beef, chicken, turkey, salmon), bison is lowest in fat and highest in iron and essential fatty acids. Try dressing it up with some low-fat cheese or sour cream, fresh cilantro or stone-ground tortilla chips.

Ingredients

16 oz ground bison
1 onion, diced
1 large carrot, peeled and finely diced
2 pasilla peppers*, seeds removed and diced
1 serrano pepper*, finely diced with seeds
1 ½ cups pale ale
3- 14 oz cans stewed Mexican style tomatoes
2- 4oz cans mild or medium green chili peppers
1-14 oz can chili beans, drained and rinsed
1- 14 oz can kidney beans, drained and rinsed
2 Tbsp olive oil
2 Tbsp whole wheat or brown rice flour
2 Tbsp chili powder
1 ½ Tbsp cumin
1 Tbsp salt
1 tsp freshly ground pepper
2 tsp agave or honey
1 1/2 Tbsp balsamic vinegar

* These peppers are found in all major grocery stores and are as easy to work with as bell peppers

RELATED – Recipe Of The Week: Vegetarian Chili

Preparation

1. Heat 1 tablespoon of the olive oil in a large pot, or French/Dutch oven, over medium high heat. Add the onion, carrot, pasilla and serrano peppers, salt and pepper and sauté for 8-10 minutes, until soft and browning.

2. Add the chili powder and cumin and let toast in the pot for another minute.

3. Toss the veggies, in the pot, with the other tablespoon of olive oil and the flour. Let cook another minute, so the raw flour flavor cooks off.

4. Lower the heat to medium.  Pour in the pale ale and combine with the ingredients in the pot. Let bubble for 2-3 minutes.

5. Stir in the bison and let cook in the mixture for about 8 minutes, until cooked through.

6. Add the green chili peppers, stewed tomatoes, beans, agave, and balsamic vinegar and stir until all the ingredients are well combined.  Lower heat to medium- low.  Cover and let simmer (low bubble) for 30 minutes.

7. Turn heat off, uncover and let sit another 15-20 minutes before serving.

More recipes from Jessica Cerra.

Jess Cerra is the owner of Fit Food by Jess, a private chef and catering company in Encinitas, Calif. Jess recently launched Harmony Bar, and all natural gluten-and soy free bar designed to tasted like a soft baked cookie. She is an ex-professional XTERRA triathlete and mountain biker, and current elite amateur road cyclist for the SPY GIANT RIDE p/b MRI Endurance team. Follow Jess’ recipes on her “Fit Food by Jess” Facebook page, as well as the “Harmony Bar” Facebook page. Also on twitter @fitfoodbyjess and @harmonybars.

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How Often Should I Replace My Running Shoes? http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/gear-tech/how-often-should-i-replace-my-running-shoes_89917 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/gear-tech/how-often-should-i-replace-my-running-shoes_89917#comments Thu, 20 Nov 2014 16:00:20 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=89917

Photo: Scott Draper/Competitor

Coach Mario Fraioli answers a question about how frequently an athlete should switch out his running shoes.

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Photo: Scott Draper/Competitor

Running coach and senior editor of Competitor magazine Mario Fraioli answers a question about how frequently an athlete should switch out his running shoes.

Q. Hi Mario,

I’m going to start training for a spring marathon this winter. How often should I replace my running shoes?

Joe

A. Joe,

Unfortunately, there’s no universal answer to this question, given that many factors figure into the lifespan of a shoe: the construction of the shoe, your physical makeup, the way in which you strike the surfaces you’re running on, and even the climate you live in.

That said, most running shoes will last between 300 and 500 miles, which is, admittedly, quite a range. Minimalist shoes and racing flats, since they have less material underfoot and are generally less durable, will typically last 200 to 400 miles.

So how do you know if your shoes need replacing? Look for the obvious signs of wear and tear, and listen to your body.

Begin by considering the outsole, the rubber part of the shoe that comes in contact with the ground. Over time, the tread of the outsole starts to wear away, just as tires on a car eventually become bald, and you begin to lose grip on the ground below. This is the most obvious sign of wear and tear — but the outsole tells only part of the story.

What is harder to see is what happens inside the shoe when you run, in the midsole, where the cushioning and support are housed. Every time your foot comes in contact with the ground, you compress that midsole area. It responds by absorbing the blow and returning energy to you as you begin the next stride. This process is repeated thousands of times during a run.

RELATED: Navigating The Running Shoe Maze

As you can imagine, the midsole becomes fatigued over the course of a couple miles and then needs time to rebound in between runs to return to its original, bouncy state. After a few hundred miles, however, the midsole breaks down to the point of no return. You can’t see this, but you can sure feel it in a sensation of “flatness” or “deadness.” The shoe doesn’t have the bounce that it once did. Little aches and pains begin to arise. You’re not injured, but your body is talking to you. It’s telling you that your shoes need changing. You should listen.

Still not sure if you should swap out your shoes? Head to your local running store, and try on a fresh new pair of your favorite training shoes side by side with the ones you’ve been running in. Feel the difference? Often, it will be pretty clear. You’ll feel higher off the ground in the newer pair if the midsole of your current pair is compressed beyond the point of no return.

Remember, don’t go solely by how the outsole looks to determine whether or not a shoe needs to be replaced. If you do most of your running on a treadmill, a smooth road, or a groomed trail, the outsole of the shoe can look fine for a long time, but the internal damage is still taking place. Note in your training log when you start running in a new pair of shoes, and keep track of how many miles you run on them. Over the course of a 12- to 16-week training cycle, you can expect to go through between two and four pairs of shoes. When you start approaching the end of the shoes’ life, it’s a good idea to start breaking in a fresh pair as you phase out the broken-down model. Your body will thank you for it.

Mario

A version of this article appears in The Official Rock ‘n’ Roll Guide To Marathon & Half-Marathon Training (VeloPress, 2013)

RELATED: Donate Your Running Shoes

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Your Smartest Moves During The Off-Season http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/training/your-smartest-moves-during-the-off-season_89913 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/training/your-smartest-moves-during-the-off-season_89913#comments Thu, 20 Nov 2014 15:30:28 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=89913

Photo: Nils Nilsen

Dear coach: What is the smartest thing I can do in the off-season to improve for next year?

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Photo: Nils Nilsen

Dear coach: What is the smartest thing I can do in the off-season to improve for next year?

The off-season is time for you to take a break from structured training and to refine your technique.

Now is when you should spend some time resting and cross-training in some sport other than triathlon. This is referred to as a transition period. Allow all those little injuries or niggles to heal. Maybe you want to try out some snow sports such as cross-country skiing or snowshoeing. Perhaps it is time to hit the trails on a mountain bike or try cyclo-cross. Ever want to try inline or ice skating? All of these will help to maintain your hard-earned fitness but will give you a mental and physical break. These activities also use different muscle groups that will benefit you next season.

RELATED: The New Off-Season Rules

You should also look at your race results and see where you stumbled this past season. Does your swim have you playing catch-up on the bike? Is your cycling always leaving you with dead legs on the run? Do you loathe running up hills or going long? Find a certified coach to do a video analysis of your swim or run technique and prescribe some drills to make you more efficient. Get a good bike fit or enroll in a technique clinic to learn skills that will carry into the new season.

RELATED: Avoiding Off-Season Weight Gain

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Dispatch: Happy Times For Hoffman http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/features/dispatch-happy-times-hoffman_109703 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/features/dispatch-happy-times-hoffman_109703#comments Thu, 20 Nov 2014 14:05:08 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=109703

Hoffman proposed to his girlfriend Kelsey Deery a couple of weeks after the Kona race. Photo: John David Becker

Kona runner-up Ben Hoffman chats about the exciting developments in his professional and personal life.

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Hoffman proposed to his girlfriend Kelsey Deery a couple of weeks after the Kona race. Photo: John David Becker

It was a blustery winter day in Denver last Saturday, but the falling flakes did not deter a group of revelers gathered to celebrate Colorado native Ben Hoffman’s breakthrough Ironman World Championship performance. The party, which showcased the NBC Kona broadcast, was hosted by two of Hoffman’s unique sponsors. The Infinite Monkey Theorem (theinfinitemonkeytheorem.com), an eclectic winery, welcomed partygoers into their urban cool downtown Denver wine bar with signature mimosas. Tender Belly (tenderbelly.com), purveyors of gourmet bacon and other fine pork products, served up a delectable brunch of eggs, grits, pancakes and bacon from their food truck. Along with the Kona broadcast, the event featured a raffle of prizes from Zoot, Specialized, Oakley and Fuel Belt, a fundraising effort for Movember and an opportunity to meet and mingle with Hoffman, his family and his fiancée, Kelsey Deery, to whom he recently proposed to before the UWC Bahamas Triathlon. As the festivities wound down, I had a chance to chat with Hoffman to learn how he’s enjoying the exciting developments in his professional and personal life.

Triathlete.com: In terms of everything that’s happened recently with Kona and your engagement, how are you feeling right now? Describe your state of mind and emotion.

BH: Life is actually really crazy right now. I’ve been traveling a lot and riding this wave of emotion from Kona. Right after Kona was done my mind obviously shifted to proposing to Kelsey. I had that planned well before the Hawaii result. It’s really cool because I feel like there’s this huge upward trajectory right now, both in my career and in my relationship as well. And to be here today and relive the Kona experience, it just keeps that feeling going. There are these slight lulls but then somebody will remind me, “I was watching you online!” or something and it reminds me of it all. So that’s how it’s been since Hawaii. Overall, it’s just an incredible sense of happiness!

RELATED PHOTOS: 2014 Kona Men’s Race

Triathlete.com: Everyone watching Kona saw the emotion between you and Kelsey at the finish line–a truly beautiful moment. I’m sure having her support was really important to you.

BH: It was really cool to have her there, and to have my whole family there. It’s funny, I was telling somebody today about Kelsey. When I proposed I didn’t get nervous in the typical sense that I think most guys do when they ask a girl to marry them–I was really confident in our relationship. But there were a few moments where I thought: There is the outside possibility that she’ll say no. But then I would remember the finish line photo of us and I would think: She loves me so much! I got this. I got this!

Triathlete.com: I saw your engagement photo on Facebook. You put the ring in the ocean in an abalone shell. Well done!

BH: Yeah, in a super beautiful abalone shell. I put the ring in there and we were snorkeling and she found it.

Triathlete.com: Was it attached to the shell? A wave could have washed it away!

BH: I did attach it with a piece of fishing line. But I was still really nervous because fish started swimming around it and checking it out, and I thought: If a fish bites it or picks it up because it’s shiny, it’s gone forever! I put it on a spot on the reef where it really stood out, so as soon as she started snorkeling in that area it was the first thing that caught her eye. I actually heard her say in her snorkel, “What’s that?” I pretended I didn’t hear her, just to let her find it. She grabbed it and brought it up to the surface and said, “Is this for me?” I said, “Of course it’s for you!” It was really special. We’ve been down there the past three years and so I knew exactly what I wanted to do and it went pretty much according to plan.

Triathlete.com: Speaking of plans, what’s next for you?

BH: Things have changed a bit in my career, so it’s about navigating new opportunities but also just taking a breath. Because it has been a lot of travel. I did Ironman Florida three weeks after Kona, then we went to the Bahamas, then I went to New York City for the Kona broadcast screening, now I’m back here and next we’re going to work on Kelsey’s house that she just bought. So there’s a lot going on, but it’s also my chance to take a break away from structured training. I probably won’t do much racing early season. I have Ironman 70.3 Pucon [January 11th] on my radar as a possibility again, just because it would be a fun trip, but mostly now it’s about taking a breath after basically a month of non-stop stuff. It’s about regrouping and putting the pieces together to build my season next year, both in terms of sponsorship and managing my brand and also in terms of putting together a race schedule that sets me up to have my best Hawaii next year.

RELATED – Bon Hoffman: I Executed My Perfect Race

More Dispatch.

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10 Ways To Use Canned Pumpkin http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/nutrition/10-ways-use-canned-pumpkin_109695 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/nutrition/10-ways-use-canned-pumpkin_109695#comments Wed, 19 Nov 2014 21:08:44 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=109695

Photo: Sue Fan and John David Becker

Pumpkin is a great addition to any athlete’s menu—it’s loaded with fiber, vitamins A and C, and immunity-boosting antioxidants.

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Photo: Sue Fan and John David Becker

The warm, spicy flavors and smells of pumpkin treats are too good to resist on a crisp fall day. Fortunately, pumpkin is actually a great addition to any athlete’s menu—it’s loaded with fiber, vitamins A and C, and immunity-boosting antioxidants. It also boasts a high potassium content, which helps to replenish lost electrolytes after hard training. Here are five creative ways to transform canned pumpkin into flavorful, healthful dishes.

Pumpkin Pasta Sauce

This recipe using Marcona almonds is reminiscent of Romesco, a popular Spanish nut- and red pepper-based sauce, but with a pleasant pumpkin twist.  

In a large saucepan, heat 2 tablespoons olive oil over medium heat and sauté 2 diced shallots for 5 minutes. Add 1 teaspoon freshly chopped thyme and ½ teaspoon freshly chopped rosemary, and sauté another minute. Add ½ cup white wine, one 15-ounce can pumpkin, 1 teaspoon each agave and salt, and let cook for 10 minutes. Purée in a blender or food processor, once slightly cooled, with ¾ cup Marcona almonds (a popular Spanish variety). Toss with a pound of your favorite pasta, ravioli or farro.

RELATED RECIPE: Pumpkin Pie With Whole Wheat Pecan Crust

Pumpkin Granola

Start your day off right with hearty pumpkin granola.

In a large bowl, whisk together 2/3 cup pumpkin purée, 1/3 cup real maple syrup, ¼ cup agave, ¼ cup canola oil (or melted coconut oil), 1 tablespoon molasses, 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract, ½ tablespoon pumpkin pie spice and ½ teaspoon salt. Add to this mixture 2 heaping cups whole rolled oats, 2 cups puffed rice, wheat or millet cereal (unsweetened), ¼ cup uncooked quinoa, 2/3 cup unsweetened shredded coconut, and ½ cup pumpkin seeds. Stir until well combined and spread onto one or two large rimmed baking sheets prepared with nonstick cooking spray. Bake at 300 degrees for 60 minutes, stirring every 15 minutes to ensure edges and bottom don’t burn. Once cooled, toss in 2/3 cup dried cranberries.

RELATED: Jess Cerra’s Famous Granola

Pumpkin Butter

Layer in granola parfaits, slather on pancakes and waffles, or trade the PB&J  for pumpkin and almond butter. Jar it and share as a holiday gift!

In a saucepan, bring one 15-ounce can pumpkin, ¼ cup agave, 2 tablespoons real maple syrup, 1 tablespoon lemon juice, and ½ tablespoon pumpkin pie spice to a boil. Reduce heat to low, and cook for 20 minutes, stirring consistently. Let cool and store in an airtight container in the fridge.

RELATED: Banana Pumpkin Breakfast Bread

Pumpkin Hummus

Impress your party guests with this unique hors d’oeuvre: a tray of warm roasted veggies, accompanied by rich pumpkin hummus.

In a blender or food processor, combine one 15-ounce can drained garbanzo beans, 1 cup canned pumpkin, ¼ cup tahini, 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice, 1 teaspoon minced garlic, ½ teaspoon paprika, ¼ teaspoon cinnamon, and salt and pepper to taste. Optional: Sprinkle toasted pumpkin seeds over the top for serving.

RELATED: The Healthy Benefits Of Hummus

Pumpkin Substitution in Baked Goods

This is a sneaky baking swap to decrease fat and calories and increase nutrients.

Substitute one 15-ounce can pumpkin for the eggs and oil in any boxed brownie mix, or use the same amount of pumpkin with ½ cup water in any cake mix (try spice cake mix) to make quick and easy pumpkin muffins, cupcakes or bread.

RELATED: Meet 3 Triathlete Bakers

Pumpkin Pie Smoothie

All the satisfaction of the velvety pumpkin pie flavor you crave without having to bake one. 

In a blender combine 1 1/2 cups vanilla almond milk, one 15-ounce can pumpkin, 1 banana, 1/4 cup pitted dates, 1 tablespoon agave, 1/2 tablespoon ground flaxseed, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 1/2 teaspoon ginger, 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg, 1/8 teaspoon cloves (or replace spices with 1 tablespoon pumpkin pie spice), and 6 ice cubes. Process until smooth, and top with chopped toasted pecans or walnuts.

RELATED RECIPE: Pumpkin-Bee Pollen Smoothie

Pumpkin Bisque

After a chilly training session, warm up with a comforting bowlful of bisque. 

In a large pot, sauté 1/2 diced yellow onion with 1 tablespoon olive oil over medium heat for 5 minutes. Add two 15-ounce cans pumpkin, 4 cups unsweetened vanilla almond milk, 1 cup low-sodium veggie broth, 3 tablespoons real maple syrup, 1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice, 1 teaspoon salt and 1/2 teaspoon pepper. Bring to a boil, then turn heat to low, cover and let simmer, stirring occasionally, for 15 minutes. Use an immersion blender (or, once cooled, a regular blender) to purée the soup until smooth.

RELATED RECIPE: Pumpkin Bisque With Roasted Pesto Veggies

Pumpkin Turkey Loaf

A healthy holiday makeover of traditional meatloaf 

In a sauté pan, cook 1 grated yellow onion with 1 tablespoon olive oil over medium heat for 5 minutes. Add 1 teaspoon minced garlic, andcook for 1 minute. Add one 15-ounce can pumpkin, 1/3 cup white wine and 1/2 cup quinoa and cook another 7–8 minutes until thick (the quinoa will not cook through). Let cool. In a bowl, whisk together 3 tablespoons ketchup, 1 tablespoon chili powder, 1/2 tablespoon ground cumin, 1 teaspoon salt, and 1/2 teaspoon each cinnamon and pepper. Add the mixture from the pan to the bowl, stirring the ingredients together. Gently fold in one 20-ounce package 93% lean ground turkey. On a baking sheet prepared with nonstick cooking spray, shape the mixture into a turkey loaf and bake at 375 degrees for 30–35 minutes, until cooked through.

RELATED – Recipe Of The Week: Veggie And Turkey Stuffed Peppers

Pumpkin Curry

Thicken up your favorite curry while warding off hunger.

Add one cup of canned pumpkin, with 1/2 cup extra of whatever liquid the recipe calls for, to your favorite curry. This makes a thick, rich curry that will fill you up and ward off hunger. Try adding pumpkin to one of these recipes: Chicken and Potato Curry with Roasted Macadamia Nuts, or Butternut Squash and Cauliflower Curry.

Pumpkin Black Bean Burgers

A great way to bind black bean burgers 

In a food processor, purée half of a 15-ounce can drained black beans, 1/2 cup canned pumpkin, 2 tablespoons light cream cheese, 1 tablespoon olive oil, 1 teaspoon each chili powder and salt, 1/2 teaspoon each cumin and pepper, and 1/4 cup oat, brown rice or whole-wheat flour until smooth. Add 1 cup cooked brown rice, the other half can of drained black beans, 1 diced shallot, 1 tablespoon freshly chopped cilantro and pulse until chunky, not smooth. Form 4–6 patties 1/2-inch thick and let rest in the freezer for 5 minutes to firm. Heat canola oil in a large sauté pan and cook 3–4 patties at a time for 5–7 min per side on medium heat, until a golden crust forms.

RELATED – TriathlEats: Black Bean Burger With Guacamole

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Matt Reed Launches MR Performance Coaching Business http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/news/matt-reed-launches-mr-performance-coaching-business_109693 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/news/matt-reed-launches-mr-performance-coaching-business_109693#comments Wed, 19 Nov 2014 20:33:59 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=109693

Matt Reed at the Beijing International Triathlon. Photo: Rocky Arroyo

We caught up with Olympian Matt Reed to talk about his new coaching business and his outlook on his pro career.

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Matt Reed at the Beijing International Triathlon. Photo: Rocky Arroyo

We caught up with Olympian Matt Reed to talk about his new coaching business, MR Performance, and his outlook on the remainder of his pro career.

Triathlete.com: What inspired you to launch a coaching business now?

Matt Reed: It’s the time in my career where it’s coming to an end—I still want to finish strong and have at least two more years I can see myself racing well—but the time has come to have an exit strategy. There’s life after racing, and I need to continue to support my family. We thought about it over the years and I just wasn’t ready to commit. I came to the end of this year and I felt like the time was right to do it. I want to keep it small initially—up to 10 people—because I do still want to race well. I want to build it to be a strong team and, who knows how big it can get. I’m excited to put to use my 25 years of experience to help people. I have a lot of knowledge not just from my training and racing, but I’ve been with so many different coaches myself—the really good ones like Brett Sutton as an example—and there’s a lot of knowledge I can use to help athletes.

Triathlete.com: Is there a specific ability level you are focusing on, or does it run the gamut?

MR: It’s everyone. It doesn’t matter if you’re a 16-hour Ironman person or a sprint distance athlete or even someone who aspires to do a triathlon, I’d love to coach all sorts of people.

Triathlete.com: What’s your coaching philosophy?

MR: I’ve learned that consistency is the most important thing. I see a lot of people doing some good, hard sessions but are not consistent with it so that work just goes to waste. You want to have fun but train consistently and stay healthy that way.

RELATED: What 40 Means To A Professional Triathlete

Triathlete.com: How will the new coaching business affect the coming season of racing—how much are you scaling back?

MR: I don’t think it will affect it at all. I’ve tried to scale back my racing the last couple of years, and that’s just a natural thing—when you get older you can’t race like you could when you were younger, when I used to race four weeks in a row. I’m 39 now, and the scaling down gives me an opportunity to do other things. I’ve found that I’ve craved doing something different other than training and my racing, and I think this is just perfect for the last couple of years of my pro career.

Triathlete.com: How does being a dad add perspective to your coaching of parent-athletes?

MR: I have three kids—ages 9, 6 and 3—so I’ve had to learn a lot about scheduling and time management, and I think that will be one of the most important aspects when it comes to my ability to help people that have full time jobs and kids. I get a lot of inquiries from people who have full time jobs, and I believe that with my experience with my family and other outside commitments I can really help them.

RELATED: 2014 Beijing International Triathlon

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Video: Quantifying Your Recovery http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/training/video-quantifying-your-recovery-2_46989 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/training/video-quantifying-your-recovery-2_46989#comments Wed, 19 Nov 2014 19:58:17 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=46989

Learn how keeping a close eye on certain recovery measurements can help you perform to your full potential.

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In this video, Sage Rountree, author of The Athlete’s Guide To Recovery, identifies the most important metrics for quantifying your recovery. Watch the video below to learn how keeping a close eye on certain recovery measurements can help you perform to your full potential.

More videos from Triathlete.com.

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2014 ITU Photos Of The Year: Cape Town http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/photos/2014-itu-photos-year-cape-town_109680 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/photos/2014-itu-photos-year-cape-town_109680#comments Wed, 19 Nov 2014 16:29:00 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=109680

Get a look at eight of the top photos from the 2014 ITU World Triathlon Series Cape Town race, which took place back in April.

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Get a look at eight of the top photos from the 2014 ITU World Triathlon Series Cape Town race, which took place back in April.

Vote for your favorite at Triathlon.org.

RELATED PHOTOS: 2014 ITU WTS Cape Town

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Fueling Your Winter Workouts http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/nutrition/fueling-your-winter-workouts_66522 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/nutrition/fueling-your-winter-workouts_66522#comments Wed, 19 Nov 2014 16:00:30 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=66522

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Minimize the weight you gain now, and you’ll have less work to do getting to optimal race weight in 2015!

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

Let’s face it—the stretch from Halloween through New Year’s is a minefield of dietary indiscretions. It’s hard to avoid packing on a few extra pounds with everyone shoving high-sugar, high-fat foods in your face. And to make matters worse, most triathletes significantly decrease their training volume in these same months—what I call the “soft season,” the exercise space that falls between full-fledged training and being a couch potato.

It’s during this season that our coaches often scale back their triathletes’ training sessions to one workout per day, with a goal of two to three sessions per sport per week. In most cases, especially for time-crunched athletes and those not preparing for iron-distance goals, weekday workouts run about 45–90 minutes with longer sessions on the weekends.

With the overall reduction in energy expenditure and shorter workouts, you can help thwart gradual weight gain by following this easy tip: Don’t take in any calories during workouts lasting up to 75 minutes. You start these workouts with enough stored carbohydrate energy (glycogen) to achieve high-quality training efforts. At easy-to-moderate intensities, this no-extra-fuel window can even stretch to 90 minutes.

Carbohydrates from sports drinks or energy gels during longer workouts and races are necessary because you’re doing what you can to make your muscle glycogen stores last longer. During shorter (60–75-minute) workouts—even a really hard interval session—you’re not going to burn through all of your glycogen stores. And what you did burn you will completely replenish within 24 hours through post-workout nutrition and your normal diet. When your training frequency was higher, it may have been harder to fully replenish glycogen stores between workouts, but that’s less of a concern during the soft season.

What’s more, you’re not likely to reduce your out-of-training consumption to compensate for what you consumed during short workouts. So, if you don’t really need it during training and won’t account for that energy later in the day, all it’s doing is increasing your total caloric intake for the day and not improving your performance.

Don’t get me wrong: You still need to take in fluids to help manage core temperature. I really like low-calorie, electrolyte-rich drinks for hydration during short workouts. Effervescent tabs such as Gu Brew Electrolyte Tablets provide electrolytes and flavor—both driving factors for increasing fluid consumption during exercise.

In this type of nutrition approach, you’re relying on high-quality foods before and after shorter workouts to provide the energy for training and adaptation. Some of the most frequent questions I get are about adjusting nutrition for workouts at various times of day. At the bottom of this article, I’ve laid out a simple strategy for morning, mid-afternoon or evening workouts.

This may not completely eliminate all weight gain between Halloween and New Year’s. After all, the 1,000-calorie pumpkin spice latte you slurped up in the afternoon is more of a problem than the 150 calories you might have consumed during your workout. Don’t obsess over it; just keep an eye on it. Weight fluctuations by a few pounds are normal and healthy for athletes. What you want to avoid is packing on more than 5 pounds from the end of your competition season to the end of your soft season. Minimize the weight you gain now, and you’ll have less work to do getting to optimal race weight in 2015!

RELATED – Nutrition Q&A: Avoiding Holiday Weight Gain

Morning workout

Before: 1 bottle of water right when you get up. Have a small (100–200-calorie) snack to regulate blood sugar, and maybe a small cup of coffee if you need some caffeine to adequately focus.

During: 1 water bottle of a low-calorie electrolyte drink.

Recovery: At least 24 ounces of water and a high-quality breakfast. If you’re short on time, a recovery drink and a smaller, on-the-go breakfast is a good compromise.

Mid-day workout

Before: 1 bottle of water throughout the morning. Low-glycemic index bar, such as a PR Bar, within an hour before your workout.

During: 1–2 water bottles of low-calorie electrolyte drink and/or water.

Recovery: At least 24 ounces of water immediately after. High-quality lunch within 30–45 minutes.

Evening workout

Before: 24-ounce bottle of water in the hour before workout; many athletes gradually become more dehydrated as the day goes on. 150–200-calorie snack about 30–60 minutes before your workout.

During: 1–2 bottles of low-calorie electrolyte drink and/or water.

Recovery: High-quality dinner within 60 minutes of the end of your workout. Drink at least 24 ounces of water before or with dinner.

RELATED – Racing Weight: The 8% Rule

Carmichael Training Systems coach Nick White co-wrote this article. Chris Carmichael is the founder and head coach of CTS, the official coaching and camps partner of Ironman. Visit Trainright.com.

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Run Your Way To A Faster Ironman Finish http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/training/run-your-way-to-a-faster-ironman-finish_15678 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/training/run-your-way-to-a-faster-ironman-finish_15678#comments Wed, 19 Nov 2014 15:50:32 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=15678

Putting in a successful 26.2-mile run means paying close attention to details during the swim, bike and transitions. Photo: Kurt Hoy

If you are a middle of the pack Ironman athlete and wonder where you can make your biggest gains, the answer usually lies in the run.

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Putting in a successful 26.2-mile run means paying close attention to details during the swim, bike and transitions. Photo: Kurt Hoy

If you are a middle of the pack Ironman athlete and wonder where you can make your biggest gains, the answer usually lies in the run. Although a large percentage of Ironman participants are capable of running a marathon in under four hours, in most iron-distance races less than 10 percent finish the run in under four hours.
How many times have we heard participants say, “I had a great swim, a great ride and a horrible run?”

Why is this? The answer is: They walk it. There is nothing wrong with walking during an Ironman—if you plan to. However, most athletes don’t plan to walk but end up doing it anyway.

Here are the reasons for unscheduled walking and suggested plans of action to help you pick up the pace:

What happened: My nutrition plan failed.

The athlete has eaten either too much or too little on the bike. Too much snacking can cause gastrointestinal problems such as sloshing, bloating or multiple bathroom stops. Too little nutrition can lead to dehydration and/or downright bonking. Worse yet, some athletes ingest the wrong nutrition. Grabbing untested goodies at the aid station is risky at best.

Solution: Practice with products.
Each person has slightly different nutritional needs which is why it’s imperative to understand how much to ingest and what liquids and foods can safely be ingested. A sports bar or drink that tastes good at home may taste like sawdust halfway through an Ironman. Test your nutrition on your long runs, rides and bricks, at race specific heart rates. Your carbohydrate ingestion should be between 200 and 400 calories per hour and your liquid ingestion between one to one-and-a-half liters per hour, depending on your weight and metabolism. Sodium intake should be about 500 to 750mg/L of fluid intake.

RELATED – Coach’s Note By Lance Watson: Are You Ready For Ironman?

What happened: I went too hard on the bike.

This is not to say you should go easy on the bike, but it’s necessary to manage your swim and bike effort so the run doesn’t suffer.

Solution: Manage your energy output.
Have a steady swim, but don’t try to break any records. We all know how hard it is to take 10 seconds off per 100 meters. The reality is that this increase in effort will only give you a six-minute advantage on the swim! The same goes for the bike portion: You can gain 20 minutes on your bike time only to lose an hour or more on your marathon. On the bike, keep your effort about five to 10 percent below your half-Ironman bike effort. One hour into the bike is a common place for athletes to forget about pacing. Check your ego in at T1 and leave it there till T2.

RELATED: How To Nail The Ironman Marathon

What happened: I transitioned through T2 too quickly.

No one should leave the second transition until they can confidently run to the first aid station.

Solution: Take your time.

By the time you get off the bike, the idea of running a marathon is often unappealing. Take some time in T2 to get yourself mentally, physically and nutritionally prepared. Be efficient and orderly, but make sure you can run to at least the first aid station before leaving transition.

RELATED: Time-Crunched 16-Week Ironman Plan

What happened: Overtraining.

While most people are adequately trained for an Ironman (at least well-trained enough to finish in under 17 hours), some take a leap of faith. The great majority do not taper properly. The most common mistake is when an athlete performs their longest run or bike session less than two to three weeks before the race date.

Solution: Ensure you are properly trained and tapered.

Your best bets are to get a qualified coach who understands your abilities and to be aware of overtraining. Listen to your body, and check your morning resting heart rate. If it is consistently five to 10 beats higher than normal, you need extra rest. If you have muscle fatigue that won’t subside, you may need to take unscheduled rest. The taper should be a minimum of two weeks to three weeks in order to let your body recover and rejuvenate for the race. The final week should be very easy, but it is important to keep moving.

RELATED: Longevity In Iron-Distance Racing

LifeSport Coach Bruce Regensburg has completed several Ironmans well into his sixties, including Hawaii, and has coached numerous Ironman athletes to successfully complete marathons. LifeSport head coach Lance Watson has coached a number of Ironman, Olympic and age-group champions over the past 25 years. He enjoys coaching athletes of all levels. Join Lance to tackle your first triathlon or perform at a higher level.

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Review: Blueseventy Core Shorts http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/gear-tech/review-blueseventy-core-shorts_109677 http://triathlon.competitor.com/2014/11/gear-tech/review-blueseventy-core-shorts_109677#comments Wed, 19 Nov 2014 13:00:28 +0000 http://triathlon.competitor.com/?p=109677

Blueseventy Core Shorts. Photo: John David Becker

The shorts give you the benefits of a pull buoy plus the ability to naturally kick without having to don full-body neoprene in the pool.

The post Review: Blueseventy Core Shorts appeared first on Triathlete.com.

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Blueseventy Core Shorts. Photo: John David Becker

The pull buoy is a valuable tool to keep your legs afloat as you focus on your stroke, build upper-body strength and give your legs the occasional rest. But when it comes to mimicking the lift you get from a wetsuit, a buoy doesn’t provide the exact same buoyancy and can limit your hip rotation. That’s why many wetsuit companies, including Blueseventy, have recently released neoprene shorts made to simulate the buoyant-hip feeling of wearing a wetsuit. You get the benefits of a pull buoy plus the ability to naturally kick without having to don full-body neoprene in the pool.

The Core shorts use the same jersey-lined material as Blueseventy’s top-end ($700) Helix suit, so they’re flexible and instantly comfortable to swim in. Although the shorts are easiest to put on dry, the flared leg openings allow for a quick slip on and off once you’re already in the pool.

RELATED – 2014 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide: Wetsuits

We liked the Core shorts most for drill work and recovery sets, and would also recommend them for warmer open-water swims when you want to practice wetsuit body position but don’t need a full suit. As a bonus for those with a coach on deck, the strategic orange graphics draw attention to how your hips are rotating.

The shorts are available in five unisex sizes (based on waist inches). If you’re in between sizes, opt for the smaller option—the drawstring helps but doesn’t completely secure the waist if they’re on the looser side.

“The Core Shorts are great for pull sets—they allow you to still freely move your legs in a light kicking pattern to keep the connection and timing between arms and legs.” –Triathlete swim expert, coach and pro triathlete Sara McLarty

$99, Blueseventy.com

RELATED: How Often Should Swim Tools Be Used?

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